About the Mapping Civil Rights History Project

The origins of Mapping Civil Rights began when Dr. Esra Ozdenerol, associate professor of Geography in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Memphis, was awarded a 2009 faculty research grant from the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change. Ozdenerol proposed launching the first interactive mapping site of the American Civil Rights Movement. During her tenure as Hooks Institute associate director, Ozdenerol updated the site in her Spatial Analysis and Geographic Education Laboratory (SAGE) at the Department of Earth Sciences. She continues to maintain the site as mapping technologies advance.

Cartographical design and GIS programming was done by:
Cem Akkus, Graduate Student, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Memphis

Historical sections of the GIS map were created with the help of the following people:
Aram Goudsouzian, Professor of History, University of Memphis
Daphene McFerren, Hooks Institute Director
Michael Blum, Graduate Student, Department of History, University of Memphis
Jennifer Amido, Hooks Institute Graduate Assistant, School of Nonprofit Administration, University of Memphis
Felecia Malone, Hooks Institute Graduate Assistant, School of Public Health, University of Memphis
Mae Israel, Writing and Editing Services, Charlotte, NC
Carla Peacher-Ryan, Hooks Institute Corporate Fellow

The essays linked to the right were created with the help of the following people:
Beverly Bond, Associate Professor of History, University of Memphis
James Conway, Graduate Student, Department of History, University of Memphis
Daphene McFerren, Hooks Institute Director
Rychetta Watkins, Ph.D.
Carla Peacher-Ryan, Hooks Institute Corporate Fellow
Alicia Clark, Graduate Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Memphis
Nathan Ball, Graduate Student, Department of History, University of Memphis

Further Readings

Bond, Beverly G. and Janann Sherman. Memphis in Black and White. Arcadia Publishing, 2003.

Dowdy, G. Wayne. Crusades for Freedom: Memphis and the Political Transformation of the American South. Oxford: University Press of Mississippi, 2010.

Dowdy, G. Wayne. Mayor Crump Don't Like It: Machine Politics in Memphis. Oxford: University Press of Mississippi, 2008.

Green, Laurie. Battling the Plantation Mentality: Memphis and the Black Freedom Struggle. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2007.

Gritter, Elizabeth. "Black Politics in the Age of Jim Crow Memphis Tennessee, 1865-1954." Ph.D. diss., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, 2010.

Honey, Michael Honey. Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2008.

Hoppe, Sherry L. and Bruce W. Speck. Maxine Smith's Unwilling Pupils: Lessons Learned in Memphis's Civil Rights Classroom. Knoxville: University of Tennessee, 2007.

Lemon, Lester. Black Tennesseans 1900-1930. Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1977.

Lovie, Henry. "The Camp of the Contrabands on the Banks of the Mississippi, Fort Pickering, Memphis, Tenn." November 22, 1862, Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, http://www.civilwarshades.org/camp-of-the-contrabands.

Melton, Gloria. "Blacks in Memphis, Tennessee, 1920-1955." Ph.D. diss., Washington State University, 1982.

Mjagkji, Nina. Organizing Black America: An Encyclopedia of African American Associations. New York: Garland Publishing, 2001.

Sigafoos, Roger Alan. Cotton Row to Beale Street: A Business History of Memphis. Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 1980.

Tucker, David. Memphis Since Crump: Bossism, Blacks and Civic Reformers, 1948-1968. Knoxville: University of Tennessee, 1979.

Wright, Sharon D. Race, Power, and Political Emergence in Memphis. London: Routledge, 1999.