Two Journalism and Strategic Media Professors Published New Books

From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics
By Otis Sanford, Hardin Chair of Excellence in Economic and Managerial Journalism

From Boss Crump to King Willie"From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics," published by the University of Tennessee Press, chronicles the political history of Memphis from the 45-year reign of Edward H. Crump as the boss of Memphis to the election of Dr. Willie W. Herenton as the city's first black mayor. The book explains in vivid detail how African Americans in Memphis fought for nearly a century for political acceptance and inclusion. From Ida B. Wells' crusade against lynchings to the civil rights movement, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the rise of black political leader Harold Ford and finally the election of Dr. Herenton, this book tells the story of Memphians and the people they entrusted with political power throughout the 20th century. For more information, go to otissanford.com

 

 

Riot Report and the News: How the Kerner Commission Changed Media Coverage of Black America
By Dr. Tom Hrach, associate professor, faculty advisor for the Society of Professional Journalists student chapter and graduate coordinator

Riot Report and the NewsJournalism faculty member Tom Hrach released his first book, "The Riot Report and the News: How the Kerner Commission Changed Media Coverage of Black America" this past September. The book is an examination of the 1968 Kerner Commission developed its media criticism, which is considered a milestone in the history of journalism. The book offers a critical look at the report and offers some praise for the late Otto Kerner, governor of Illinois, who was the commission's namesake. The book was published by the University of Massachusetts Press.