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Dr. Jerry Bartholomew Dr. Jerry Bartholomew

Dr. Jerry BartholomewFaculty Biography Photo
Professor and Chair
Phone: (901) 678-4536
Fax:
E-mail: jbrthlm1@memphis.edu
Office: 001 Johnson Hall

Education Degrees

B.S., Penn State, 1964

M.S., University of Southern California, 1969

PhD., Virginia Tech , 1971

 

Welcome to both students and colleagues!

My interests span a wide range of geologic subjects and regions and I am currently working with colleagues and students both at the University of Memphis and elsewhere on different problems. I, along with several other members of the department, am especially interested in relationships among active faults, associated seismicity, and geomorphologic expression of those faults.

 

Active Faults and Associated Seismicity

Northern Basin and Range in Yellowstone’s wake: This region is one of my primary areas of interest; it contains many faults with Late Quaternary surface ruptures. One of my former graduate students (Mike Bone, MS 2008) and I have worked with other colleagues onNorthern Basin and Range in Yellowstone trenches, shallow seismic lines (with Jose Pujol), gradiometer surveys (with Andrew Mickelson), and OSL dating (with Tammy Rittenour at Utah State University). On the Lima Reservoir fault, we have now documented slip-vectors for 8 paleoearthquakes during the last 40,000 years. These slip-vectors show that the tectonic transition from the hotspot back to the Basin and Range is currently taking place and we are investigating how that process happens. The photograph above shows the main fault, located about 1m to Mike’s right, with a collapsed and filled vent of a sand blow in between him and the fault. Another, older, sand blow with a feeder dike is about 1m to Mike’s left. A buried A soil-horizon is 0.5m above his head within the Bk soil-horizon and another one is above the Bk horizon. The base of the Bk soil-horizon
(at the level of Mike’s head) marks the base of the Holocene. We are currently revising one of manuscripts for resubmission.

Pujol, J., Bartholomew, M.J., Michelson, A., Bone, M. J., 2010, Using synthetic data to guide processing of shallow seismic reflection data collected across a high scarp in SW Montana: Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, 2010 Annual Meeting, Keystone Colorado, no. 99, p.593-601.

Bartholomew, M.J., Bone, M.J., Rittenour, T.M., Mickelson, A.M., Stickney, M.C., 2009, “Stress switching” along the Lima Reservoir fault in Yellowstone’s wake: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.41, no.7, p.55.

Bartholomew, M. J., Greenwell, R.A., Wasklewicz, T.A., Stickney, M.C., 2009, Alluvial fans: sensitive tectonic indicators of fault-segmentation and stress-field partitioning along the Red Rock fault, northern Basin and Range of southwestern Montana, U.S.A.: Northwest Geology, v. 38, p. 41-66.

Bartholomew, M.J., Stickney, M.C., Wilde, E.M., Dundas, R.G., 2002, Late Quaternary paleoseismites: Syndepositional features and section restoration used to indicate paleoseismicity and stress-field orientations during faulting along the main Lima Reservoir fault, southwestern Montana, p. 29-47 in F.R. Ettensohn, N. Rast, C.E. Brett, editors, Ancient Seismites: Geological Society of America, Special Paper 359, 190p.

 

Eastern Tibetan Plateau: Along with my current PhD student, Taylor Armstrong (MS, 2012), I have been involved in a cooperative project for several years with Dewei Li, Demin Liu, and other colleagues at China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, on active faults in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. We began field investigations of surface ruptures just 10 days after the 14 April, 2010 Yushu earthquake and presented preliminary
results at the 2010 National GSA and AGU meetings and published a paper in 2012. In 2011 and 2012 we excavated two trenches across different segments of the Yushu fault and obtained 14C and OSL data (with Tammy Rittenour at Utah State University) for presentations at the 2012 National GSA meeting and for the “Roof of the World” meeting in Chengdu in June 2013. We also will do additional trenching this fall.

Eastern Tibetan Plateau1Eastern Tibetan Plateau2

The photograph to the left shows a small stream channel (with water; in foreground) which is offset ~0.5m (left lateral) and blocked from flowing down its dry channel (white pebbles in background). An exciting part of this project is to be able to examine features along surface ruptures shortly after the earthquake and before natural and human processes have altered the features and comparing surfaces features to what we find in our excavations. Another aspect is that we have obtained satellite-images draped over the DEM (to the left).

Eastern Tibetan Plateau3

The photograph below shows mapped geomorphic features and surface-rupture features such as the offset stream on the previous photo. In this area, the surface displacement dies out rapidly where one segment-boundary of the Yushu fault ends.

Armstrong, T.F, Bartholomew,M.J., Feng, L., Li, D., Liu, D., Rittenour, T., Sun,G., 2013, Paleoseismicity of the Guoqiong segment of the Yushu fault following the Mw6.9 14 April 2010 Yushu earthquake, Qinghai Province, China: Abstracts of the first joint scientific meeting of Geological Society of China and Geological Society of America International Division (The Roof of the World), Chendu, Sichuan (China)June-17-19, 2013, Acta Geologica Sinica, v.87 Supp., p.329-330, ISSN 1000-9515.

Bartholomew, M.J., Armstrong, T.F., Feng, L., Rittenour, T., Li, D., Liu, D., Luo, W., Feng, C., Sun, G., 2013, Segmentation of the Yushu Fault Associated With the 14 April, 2010 Yushu Earthquakes, Qinghai Province, China: Abstracts of the first joint scientific meeting of Geological Society of China and Geological Society of America International Division (The Roof of the World), Chendu, Sichuan (China)June-17-19, 2013, Acta Geologica Sinica, v.87 Supp., p.334-335, ISSN 1000-9515.

Feng, C., Li, D., Bartholomew, J. M., Luo, W., 2012, Characteristics and patterns of surface ruptures caused by the Yushu earthquake: Geotectonica et Metallogenia, V. 36, no. 1, p.69-75.

Armstrong, T.F., Bartholomew, M.J., Liu, D., Feng, L., Sun, G., and Li, D., 2012, Paleoseismicity of the Guoqiong segment of the Yushu fault following the Mw6.9 14 April 2010 earthquake, Qinghai Province, China: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.44, no.7, p.549.

Li, D., Bartholomew, M.J., Luo, W., Feng, C., 2010, Surface ruptures associated with the 14 April, 2010 Yushu earthquakes, eastern Tibetan Plateau, Qinhai Province, China: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.42, no.5, p.198.

Bartholomew, M.J., Li, D., Luo, W., Feng, C., 2010, Surface displacements determined from offset features and landform-restoration along faults associated with the 14 April, 2010 Yushu earthquakes, eastern Tibetan Plateau, Qinhai Province, China:Abstract NH31B-1356 Poster presented at 2010 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysics Union,, San Francisco, California, 13-17 December.

I am also interested in the tectonic analysis of Quaternary features and fracture sets of both the Giles County (Virginia) seismic zone and the Atlantic Coastal Plain, including the epicentral region of the 1886 Charleston earthquake (South Carolina). In 2012 Fred Rich and I published a new map of the Pliocene and Pleistocene terraces and shoreline features to show how potentially active faults influence shoreline and river deflections during shoreline regression. Also in 2012, Roy Van Arsdale and I published on structural controls on intraplate earthquakes. Our paper establishes the way in which brittle fracture sets develop as post-orogenic features which can be multiply reactivated, depending upon the hierarchical order and scaling of fracture sets.

Bartholomew, M.J., Rich, F.J., 2012, Pleistocene shorelines and coastal rivers: Potential sensitive indicators of Quaternary tectonism along the Atlantic Coastal Plain of North America, p. 17-36 in Cox, R.T., Tuttle, M.P., Boyd, O.S., Locat, J., editors, Recent Advances in North American Paleoseismology and Neotectonics East of the Rockies: Geological Society of America, Special Paper 275p. doi:10.1130/2013.2493(02).

Bartholomew, M.J., Van Arsdale, R., 2012, Structural controls on intraplate earthquakes, U.S.A., p. 165-189 in Cox, R.T., Tuttle, M.P., Boyd, O.S., Locat, J., editors, Recent Advances in North American Paleoseismology and Neotectonics East of the Rockies: Geological Society of America, Special Paper 493, 275p. doi:10.1130/2013.2493(08).

 

Giles County Seismic Zone, VA: The diagram below (from Bartholomew and Whitaker, 2010) shows the orientations of the youngest post-Alleghanian faults and joints identified (localities 1-10) along the Glen Lyn syncline, which is the structural front of Appalachian fold-thrust belt, in relation to fault-plane solutions of the nearby Giles County seismic zone. I hope to begin a more detailed analysis of fracture sets across this part of the fold and thrust belt in the next few years.

Bartholomew, M.J., Whitaker, A.E., 2010, The Alleghanian deformational sequence at the foreland junction of the central and southern Appalachians, p. 431-454 in Tollo, R.P., Bartholomew, M.J., Hibbard, J.P., Karabinas, P.M, editors, 2010, From Rodinia to Pangea: The Lithotectonic Record of the Appalachian Region: Geological Society of America Memoir 206, Boulder, Colorado, 956p.

 Giles County Seismic Zone

1886 Charleston Earthquake, SC: Following the analysis (Bartholomew and Rich, 2007) of joints and normal faults (see photograph below, left) which formed in the walls of Fort Dorchester (built in 1758-60) during the 1886 Charleston earthquake, Andrew Mickelson and I are now combining archaeology and geology and working with the site archaeologists (Ashley Chapman and Rebekah Sease) to map the colonial town of Dorchester (built in 1697). Using a gradiometer we can image the subsurface beneath buildings and depressions (see photograph below, right; this depression has a likely clastic dike beneath it) to determine if they are caused or affected by the 1886 earthquake. We have also identified a possible left-lateral reverse offset of a colonial kiln (ca.1697) by a fault that likely moved in 1886 (see gradiometer image below). We expect to begin excavations in the coming year.

1886 Charleston Earthquake1

1886 Charleston Earthquake2

1886 Charleston Earthquake  

Mickelson, A. M., Bartholomew, M.J., Chapman, A., Sease, R., 2011, Paleoseismites which formed prior to and during the 31 August 1886 Charleston earthquake in colonial Dorchester, South Carolina: Southeastern Geology, v.48, no.3, p.129-146.

Bartholomew, M.J., Rich, F.J., 2007, The walls of colonial Fort Dorchester: A record of structures caused by the August 31, 1886 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake and its subsequent earthquake history: Southeastern Geology, V.44, no.4, p.147-169.

Bartholomew, M.J., Rich, F. J., Whitaker, A. E., Lewis, S. E., Brodie, B. M., Hill, A. A., 2000, Preliminary interpretation of fracture sets in Upper Pleistocene and Tertiary strata of the lower Coastal Plain in Georgia and South Carolina, p.19-27 in C. Abate, editor, A Compendium of Field Trips of South Carolina Geology with Emphasis on the Charleston, South Carolina, Area; Conducted in Association with the Geological Society of America - Southeastern Section Meeting, March 23-24, 2000 Charleston South Carolina: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey, Columbia, South Carolina, 65p.

 

Paleoseismites in Tertiary and Older Rocks

An extension of my interest in active faults is an interest in paleoseismites which are significantly older than Late Quaternary ones associated with active faults and modern seismicity. These older paleoseismites provide clues as to the magnitude and frequency of paleo-earthquakes and the formation of joints and faults during past periods of tectonism.   Again working with colleagues and students at other institutions, I and students here at the University of Memphis have the opportunity to work on: (1) Pennsylvanian, Cretaceous-Paleocene, and Eocene paleoseismites in northern Wyoming and southeastern Montana which are related to Laramide and other deformational events; (2) Triassic paleoseismites of the Deep River Triassic basin in North Carolina associated with early rifting related to opening of the Atlantic Ocean; (3) Cretaceous, Late Eocene, and Late Miocene paleoseismites related to tectonism affecting the Atlantic Coastal Plain in Georgia and South Carolina; and (4) late Mississippian paleoseismites which were the precursor of Alleghanian deformation along the foredeep bulge at the Appalachian Roanoke Recess in Virginia and West Virginia.

 

Paleoseismites of the Big Horn Basin, MT and WY: The picture below shows paleo sand-blow vents in two different beds of Cretaceous strata separated by undeformed strata deposited after each sand-blow event. The arrows show the direction of flow up through the vents with steeply dipping to vertical sidewalls. Truncation of the vents by overlying, then flat-lying strata tells us that they occurred at the ground-surface at the time of deposition. Thus their relationships with joints and faults, is crucial for determining the depths at which some of those joints actually formed and the how the frequency of large earthquakes may related to the rate of uplift of Laramide features.

Paleoseismites1  

Jackson, W.T., Jr., Bartholomew, M.J., Dupre, W.R., Armstrong, T.F., Stewart, K.., 2012, Campanian paleoseismites: Indicators of earliest Laramide deformation in the Eagle Formation of the Elk Basin anticline, Wyoming and Montana: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.44, no.7, p.556-557.

Bartholomew, M.J., Stewart, K.G., Wise, D.U., and Ballantyne, H.A., 2008, Field Guide: Paleoseismites: Indicators of Laramide tectonism and other events near the Bighorn Basin, Montana and Wyoming, p. 135-158 in Thomas, R.C., and Gibson, R.I., eds., The Red Lodge Area, Montana: Tobacco Root Geological Society 33th Annual Field Conference – July 31 – August 3, 2008: Northwest Geology, v. 37, 172p.

Stewart, K.G., Bartholomew, M.J., Ballantyne, H.A., 2008, Laramide paleoseismites of the Bighorn Basin, p.249-264 in R.G. Raynolds, editor, Roaming the Rocky Mountains and Environs: Geological Field Trips:, Geological Society of America Field Guide 10, Denver, Colorado, 310p.

Stewart, K. G., Dennison, J. M., Bartholomew, M.J., 2002, Late Mississippian paleoseismites from southeastern West Virginia and southwestern Virginia, p.127-144 in F.R. Ettensohn, N. Rast, C.E. Brett, editors, Ancient Seismites: Geological Society of America, Special Paper 359, 190p.

 

Paleoseismites of the Deep River Triassic Basin, NC: I worked with a number geologists on the (now abandoned) potential low-level radioactive waste-disposal site in Wake County (near Raleigh), NC. At the site, we dug numerous trenches across Triassic faults as well as a 4000-foot-long trench across the entire site. Our work included structural analysis all the faults and joint-sets mapped at the site was well regional mapping of fracture sets in and around the northern part of the Deep River Triassic basin. Of particular interest to me are the relationships among the near-surface structures that formed during the time of deposition.

Wooten, R.M.,Bartholomew, M.J., Malin, P.E., 2001, Structural features exposed in Triassic sedimentary rocks near the proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal site, southwestern Wake County, North Carolina, p.51-74 in Hoffman, W., editor, Guidebook for 2001 Geological Society of America - Southeastern Section Meeting, April 5-6, 2001, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, 203p.

Bartholomew, M.J., Fleischmann, K.H., Wilson, J.F., 1994, Structural features associated with the Jonesboro fault where it crosses U.S. Highway 70, Wake County, North Carolina, p.69-74 in E.F. Stoddard, D.E. Blake, editors, Geology and Field Trip Guide, Western Flank of the Raleigh Metamorphic Belt, North Carolina, Carolina Geological Society Field Trip Guidebook 1994: North Carolina Geological Survey, 110p.

 

Post-Alleghanian Fractures of Piedmont and Atlantic Coastal Plain: Fred Rich (Georgia Southern University), Mark Evans (Central Connecticut University) and I are continuing to analyze data from our extensive study of post-Alleghanian fractures of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of South Carolina and Georgia.

Post-Alleghanian Fractures1

Post-alleghanian Fractures 2

Post-Alleghanian Fracture3 Post-alleghanian factures4

Post-alleghanian fractures5 

 

Recent publications and abstracts on paleoseismites and fracture sets

Evans, M.A., Bartholomew, M.J., 2010, Crustal fluid evolution during deformation, uplift, and exhumation of the southeastern Piedmont of the southern Appalachians: Late Paleozoic through Mesozoic rifting, p. 553-577 in Tollo, R.P., Bartholomew, M.J., Hibbard, J.P., Karabinas, P.M., editors, 2010, From Rodinia to Pangea: The Lithotectonic Record of the Appalachian Region: Geological Society of America Memoir 206, Boulder, Colorado, 956p.

Bartholomew, M.J., Evans, M.A., Rich, F.J., Brodie, B.M., Heath, R.D., 2009, Rifting and drifting in South Carolina: Fracture history in Alleghanian granites and Coastal Plain strata. Carolina Geological Society 2009 Annual Field Trip: Georgia Southern University, Department of Geology and Geography, Contribution Series no.2, 50p.

Bartholomew, M.J., Rich, F.J., Lewis, S.E., Brodie, B.M., Heath, R.D., Slack, T.Z., Trupe, C.H., III, and Greenwell, R.A., 2007, Preliminary interpretation of Mesozoic and Cenozoic fracture sets in Piedmont metamorphic rocks and in Coastal Plain strata near the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, p.7-37 in F.J. Rich, editor, Guide to Field Trips - 56th Annual Meeting, Southeastern Section Geological Society of America: Georgia Southern University, Department of Geology and Geography, Contributution Series no.1, 198p.

Bartholomew, M.J., Brodie, B.M., Willoughby, R.H., Lewis, S.E., Syms, F.H., 2002, Mid-Tertiary paleoseismites: Syndepositional features and section restoration used to indicate paleoseismicity, Atlantic Coastal Plain, South Carolina and Georgia, p. 63-74 in F.R. Ettensohn, N. Rast, C.E. Brett, editors, Ancient Seismites: Geological Society of America, Special Paper 359, 190p.

  

The Grenville Orogen

I also have long standing interests in the tectonics of Grenvillian basement rocks of the central and southern Appalachians. I am particularly interested developing a better understanding and constraining the ages of the Grenvillian deformational events in the Grenvillian Blue Ridge terrane of the Central and Southern Appalachians and the breakup of that during failed-rifting leading up to the development of the Iapetus ocean.

Bartholomew and Hatcher (2010) proposed a new model for evolution of the eastern margin of Laurentia from the Elzevirian orogeny, through the three phases of the Grenvillian orogeny, and then followed by the possible migration of a hotspot prior to Iapetan rifting (see summary diagram below).Grenville Orogen1

On the diagram below, Bartholomew and Hatcher (2010) tentatively identified the Elzevirian suture as the long narrow belt with a magnetic low signature similar to that of the Paleozoic Suwannee-Wiggins suture across southern Georgia.

Grenville Orogen2

Bartholomew, M.J., Hatcher, R.D., Jr., 2010, The Grenville orogenic cycle of southern Laurentia: Unraveling sutures, rifts, and shear zones as potential piercing points for Amazonia (invited paper), p.4-20 in Casquet, C., Cordani, U., Pankhurst, R.J., eds., The Grenville Orogen of Central and South America: Special Issue 1, Journal of South American Earth Sciences, 159p. 

Brent Miller (Texas A&M University) and I presented our results at the National GSA meeting in 2010 on recently dated plutonic rocks from the Lovingston massif (in Virginia) which were emplaced as part of the youngest (Rigolet) phase of the Grenvillian orogeny which significantly affected the Lovingston massif, but not the Pedlar massif which is comprised primarily of older (Ottawan) AMCG plutonic rocks emplaced into still older deformed rocks. The rocks we dated include the alkali Roseland Anorthosite and adjacent Roses Mill Pluton (jotunite) which were both emplaced at about 1010 Ma and the Archers Mountain Suite emplaced at about 1019 Ma).

Grenville Orogen2

Grenville Orogen4

 

Grenville Orogen5

Bartholomew, M.J., Miller, B.V., 2010, Culminating pulse of plutonism in the Grenvillian Blue Ridge terrane of southern Laurentia: Zircon-ages from the Archer Mountain Suite, Roseland Anorthosite, and Roses Mill Pluton of the Lovingston massif: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.42, no.5, p.516.

Ann Heatherington (University of Florida) and I presented results of preliminary work to constrain the ages of different Grenvillian structural events (Heatherington and Bartholomew, 2008) in the Watauga massif (North Carolina) where polydeformed folds in the Roundabout Creek Gneiss are cut by a dike (1040 Ma) of the Laurel Creek (granite) Pluton (1050-55 Ma) (see photograph below; younger mafic dike with Paleozoic foliation cuts across the older gneiss and granitic dike in the top of the photograph). An older, folded and foliated, granitic gneiss, which postdated the first event, but was deformed by the second event, appears to be about 1165 Ma.

Grenville Orogen6 

Heatherington, A. L., Bartholomew, M.J., 2008, Geological constraints on Grenvillian deformational events in the Blue Ridge, Baldwin Gap quadrangle, NW North Carolina: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.40, no.2, p.28.

 

Other publications and abstracts on the Grenville orogen and Iapetan rifting

Bartholomew, M.J., Tollo, R.P., 2004, Northern ancestry for the Goochland terrane as a displaced fragment of Laurentia: Geology, v. 32, no.8, p.669-672.

Bartholomew, M.J., Tollo, R.P., 2004, Reply to a Discussion by Bailey, C., Owens, B., and Shirvell, C.R. of: Northern ancestry for the Goochland terrane as a displaced fragment of Laurentia: Geology, v. 32, no. 12, Online Forum.

Tollo, R.P., Corriveau, L., McLelland,J., Bartholomew, M.J., 2004, Proterozoic tectonic evolution of the Grenville orogen in North America: An introduction, p.1-18 in R.P. Tollo, L. Corriveau, J.B. McLelland, M.J. Bartholomew, editors, 2004, Proterozoic Tectonic Evolution of the Grenville Orogen in North America: Geological Society of America Memoir197, 820p.

Hughes, S.S.,Lewis, S.E., Bartholomew, M.J., Sinha, A.K., Herz, N., 2004, Geology and geochemistry of granitic and charnockitic rocks in the central Lovingston massif of the Grenvillian Blue Ridge Terrane, U.S.A., p.549-569 in R.P. Tollo, L. Corriveau, J.B. McLelland, M.J. Bartholomew, editors, 2004, Proterozoic Tectonic Evolution of the Grenville Orogen in North America: Geological Society of America Memoir197, 820p.

Tollo, R.P., Aleinikoff, J.N., Bartholomew, M.J., Rankin, D.W., 2004, Neoproterozoic A-type granitoids of the central and southern Appalachians: Intraplate magmatism associated with episodic rifting of the Rodinian supercontinent: Precambrian Research, V.128, no.1, p.3-38.

Hughes, S.S., Lewis, S.E., Bartholomew, M.J., Sinha, A.K., Hudson, T.A., Herz, N., 1997, Chemical diversity and origin of Precambrian charnockitic rocks of the central Pedlar massif, Grenvillian Blue Ridge Terrane, Virginia: Precambrian Research, V. 84, p.37-62.

Bartholomew, M.J., 1992, Structural characterization of the late Proterozoic (post‑Grenville) continental margin of the Laurentian craton, p.443-467 in M.J.

Bartholomew, D.W. Hyndman, D.W. Mogk, R. Mason, editors, BASEMENT TECTONICS 8: Characterization and Comparison of Ancient and Mesozoic Continental Margins‑‑Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference on Basement Tectonics, held in Butte, Montana, USA, August, 1988: Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 745p.

Bartholomew, M.J., Lewis, S.E., 1992, Appalachian Grenvillian massifs: pre‑Appalachian translational tectonics, p.363-374 in R. Mason, editor, BASEMENT TECTONICS 7: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Basement Tectonics, held in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, August, 1987: Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 480p.

 

Other studies include work on the Appalachian and Cordilleran Fold-Thrust Belt fold & thrust belts

Thrust belts

Bartholomew, M.J., Whitaker, A.E., 2010, The Alleghanian deformational sequence at the foreland junction of the central and southern Appalachians, p. 431-454 in Tollo, R.P., Bartholomew, M.J., Hibbard, J.P., Karabinas, P.M, editors, 2010, From Rodinia to Pangea: The Lithotectonic Record of the Appalachian Region: Geological Society of America Memoir 206, Boulder, Colorado, 956p.

Bartholomew, M.J., Lewis, S.E., 2010, Orphans of the far-traveled Pulaski thrust sheet: Exotic detached duplexes and their implications for original fold-thrust geometry, p. 417-430 in Tollo, R.P., Bartholomew, M.J., Hibbard, J.P., Karabinas, P.M, editors, 2010, From Rodinia to Pangea: The Lithotectonic Record of the Appalachian Region: Geological Society of America Memoir 206, Boulder, Colorado, 956p.

Schultz, A.P., Bartholomew, M.J., 2010, Geologic map of the Radford South quadrangle, Virginia: Virginia Division of Geology and Mineral Resources, Open File Report 10-8, 1:24,000-scale map.

Schultz, A.P., Bartholomew, M.J., 2010, Geologic map of the Dublin quadrangle, Virginia: Virginia Division of Geology and Mineral Resources, Open File Report 10-9, 1:24,000-scale map.

Schultz, A.P., Bartholomew, M.J., 2009, Geologic map of the Radford North quadrangle, Virginia: Virginia Division of Geology and Mineral Resources, Open File Report 09-01, 1:24,000-scale map.

Schultz, A.P., Bartholomew, M.J., 2009, Geologic map of the Staffordsville quadrangle, Virginia: Virginia Division of Geology and Mineral Resources, Open File Report 09-02, 1:24,000-scale map.

Schultz, A.P., Bartholomew, M.J., 2010, The need for legacy geologic maps in the New River Valley, Virginia: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.42, no.5, p.516.

Schultz, A.P., Bartholomew, M.J., Gilmer, A.K., 2012, Geology of the White Gate, Virginia, 7.5-min.-quadrangle: Revisiting large-scale landslides and ridge crest sacking: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.44, no.4, p.20.

Judy, K., Bartholomew, M.J., 2011, Layer parallel shortening: A mechanism for determining the sequence of deformation of the Little Water syncline, Tendoy Mountains, southwestern Montana: Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, V.43, no.7, p.35.

                                               

 

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