Graduate Catalog
Chemistry


GARY L. EMMERT, PhD
Interim Chair
Room 210, J.M. Smith Chemistry Building

DANIEL L BAKER, PhD
Coordinator of Graduate Studies
(901)-678-4178


E-mail: gradchem@memphis.edu

www.chem.memphis.edu

I. The Department of Chemistry offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a major in chemistry. Concentrations are available in analytical, computational, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. Related courses may be taken in other departments including physics, mathematics, geology, biology, and engineering and in fields other than the student’s major within the Department of Chemistry.

 All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued.

II. MS Degree Program

Program objectives are: (1) competence in a common core of material in the major area of specialization; (2) experience in experimental design, data analysis, and oral and written presentation of research results; (3) competitive for professional positions in the chemical sciences.

A. Program Admission and Prerequisites

Prospective students, in addition to meeting the requirements for admission to The Graduate School, are required to present as a prerequisite for admission a satisfactory record of undergraduate work in chemistry; normally 32 semester hours of chemistry will be required, including quantitative analysis, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry (biochemistry may also be taken). Students who are deficient in undergraduate work may be admitted and the deficiencies removed without graduate credit. Submission of GRE scores is required for admission, but permission for a waiver may be requested from the department for extraordinary circumstances.

B. Program Requirements

  1. Diagnostic Examinations — Before registering for the first time, incoming graduate students will take a series of six standardized examinations, in general, analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. The examinations are at a level equivalent to completion of the following undergraduate courses at the University of Memphis: CHEM 4111 (inorganic),4211 (analytical), 3310 and 3511 (organic), 4411 (physical), and 4512 (biochemistry). A candidate for the Master of Science degree must make at least 50th percentile on the general chemistry test to remain in the program. A candidate for the Master of Science degree must make at least 50th percentile on the analytical and organic tests plus one of the remaining three or take the equivalent classes (CHEM 6111, 6211, 6311, 6411, 6511). Students should note that a score of 75th percentile on the test or a "B" or better in the course is prerequisite to higher level graduate courses in each area.
  2. Course Work Requirements — The thirty semester-hour total required is subject to the following restrictions:
    1. No more than 9 hours of credit at the 6000 level may be counted towards the Master of Science degree. At least 9 hours must be in courses numbered CHEM 7100-7899, with at least two areas of chemistry represented.
    2. A maximum of 6 semester hours of Chemistry 7996 (Thesis) can be applied to the 30 semester hour requirement.
    3. A maximum of 3 semester hours of CHEM 7910/8910 (Special Problems in Chemistry) may be counted toward the 30 semester hour requirement.
    4. Presentation (CHEM 7911) is required of all graduate students. A maximum of 4 semester hours from some combination of CHEM 7911 and 7/8913 (Seminar) may be used to meet the 30 semester hours required.
    5. A maximum of 6 semester-hours credit can be granted for graduate courses successfully completed at other regionally accredited institutions. Credit previously earned at another institution must be presented for evaluation not later than the end of the student’s second semester of enrollment.
    6. No more than 6 semester hours of CHEM 7001 (Directed Research) and CHEM 7996 (Thesis) combined may be counted toward the 30 semester-hour requirement.
  3. Comprehensive Examinations — The student must begin the written part of the comprehensive examinations by the beginning of the third semester and take up to eight consecutive tests. These are described in the summary of the administration of the graduate program. A student pursuing the master’s degree must obtain a total of at least six points. Any student who has not amassed six points at the completion of eight tests is automatically terminated from the Master’s degree program. Written permission from the student’s Advisory Committee and the Graduate Studies Committee is required to delay beginning the tests or to delay continuing once the student has begun taking tests. Within six months of obtaining the required six points, students must complete the oral part of the comprehensive examinations. The student will prepare a Research Prospectus on his or her thesis research problem, to be presented orally to the Advisory Committee in an open meeting and in a written form to the Graduate Studies Committee. The oral comprehensive examination can be repeated only once.
  4. Seminar — Participation in seminar is required during each semester of residence (excluding summer terms).
  5. The Advisory Committee — Upon admission to the Graduate School, the student will be advised by the Department’s Graduate Studies Committee. A student must choose a major professor before the end of the first semester following enrollment. The major professor, in consultation with the student, will recommend the faculty members to be appointed to the student’s Advisory Committee. This committee, which is appointed before the student's First Year Conference, must be composed of at least three members, with the major professor serving as chair. Upon appointment, the committee will review the student’s progress to date and outline an appropriate program tailored to the student’s individual interests to permit fulfillment of the degree requirements. The student will be regularly evaluated by their Advisor and Advisory Committee. In the unlikely event that a student changes major professors, a new Advisory Committee must be appointed.
  6. Thesis Option — Each student must submit a thesis acceptable to the student’s Advisory Committee. The thesis can be based on work done for CHEM 7996, for which a maximum of six credit-hours can be applied to the degree requirement. NOTE: Students electing to write a thesis should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
  7. Non-Thesis Option — If a non-thesis program is selected, a student must 1) take two additional 7/8000-level course and 2) prepare a detailed report in the form of a review or proposal (which can be based on literature research). Three hours credit for CHEM 7910 will be earned. A minimum of three semester-hours from one credit of CHEM 7911 and two credits of 7/8913 (Seminar) must be earned. Thesis credits (Chem 7996) do not count toward the non-thesis degree. No more than four credits of Chem 7001 and Chem 7910 together may be counted toward the non-thesis MS. For the non-thesis option, a maximum of 9 hours of course work may be included in a field related to chemistry (physical or biological sciences, mathematical sciences, or engineering).
  8. Final Oral Examination — A final oral examination on the student’s thesis or report and related material will be administered by the student’s Advisory Committee after completion of all other requirements. This examination will be held seven or more days after the student has distributed copies of the thesis or report to the members of the Advisory Committee, which must be done at least one month before the end of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. If the final oral examination is unsatisfactory it must be repeated within one year; it may not be repeated more than once.
  9. Retention — A student pursuing the Master’s degree program may be terminated for any of the following reasons:
    1. Failure to maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or above. A student who has a cumulative grade point average below 3.0 will be placed on probation. Continuation in graduate school must be approved by the Vice Provost for Graduate Studies. Any person whose continuation is denied may appeal the decision to the University Council for Graduate Studies.
    2. Failure to accumulate the requisite number of points on the departmental comprehensive examinations (See Section 3).
    3. Failure to complete the degree requirements within six years of initial enrollment in the graduate program.
    4. Failure to make satisfactory progress towards the degree in a timely fashion, as determined by the Departmental Program Retention Committee.
    5. Failure to satisfy the Advisory Committee on the final oral examination (See Section 8).

III. PhD Degree Program

Program objectives are: (1) competence in a common core of material in the major area of specialization; (2) proficiency in a minor area of specialization outside of the major; (3) development of expertise in experimental design, data analysis, and oral and written presentation of research results; (4) competitive for professional positions in the chemical sciences.

A. Program Admission

See MS admission requirements.

B. Program Requirements

  1. Diagnostic Examinations — Before registering for the first time, incoming graduate students will take a series of six standardized examinations, chosen from general, analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. The examinations are at a level equivalent to completion of the following undergraduate courses at The University of Memphis: CHEM 4111 (inorganic), 4211 (analytical), 3310 and 3511 (organic), 4411 (physical), and 4512 (biochemistry). A doctoral candidate must make at least 50th percentile on four of the upper-level tests (analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical tests) or must take four of the equivalent classes (CHEM 6111, 6211, 6311, 6411, 6511). A candidate for the PhD degree must make at least 70th percentile on the general chemistry test to remain in the program. Students should note that a score of 75th percentile on the test or a "B" or better in the course is prerequisite to higher level graduate courses in each area.
  2. Course Work Requirements — The doctoral degree program includes the requirement of the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 72 semester hours of graduate credit beyond the BS degree. The 72-hour total is subject to the following restrictions:
    1. No more than 12 hours of credit at the 6000 level may be counted towards the doctoral degree. At least 12 hours must be in courses numbered CHEM 7100-7899 (8100-8899; however, a maximum of 1 hour of Presentation (CHEM 7911) may be combined into this total), with at least two areas of chemistry represented.
    2. A maximum of 32 hours credit for CHEM 8001 (Directed Research) and CHEM 9000 (Dissertation) combined can be applied toward the 72-hour total.
    3. A maximum of 12 hours of CHEM 7/8910 (Special Problems in Chemistry) may be credited toward the total hour requirement.
    4. A maximum of 12 hours of course work may be included in a field related to chemistry (physical or biological sciences, mathematical sciences, or engineering). Courses taken in related areas must be numbered 6000 or above. However, these related courses cannot substitute for the more than six of the twelve hours of required CHEM 7/8000-level courses for the PhD Degree.
    5. Presentation (CHEM 7911) and Advanced Presentation (CHEM 8911) are required. A maximum of 4 semester hours from some combination of CHEM 7911, 8911, and 7/8913 may be used to meet the 72 semester-hour requirement.
    6. A maximum of 30 hours of graduate course credit completed at the University or other accredited institution (including credit applied on an MS degree) may be applied to the 72-hour requirement subject to the approval of the student’s Advisory Committee and the Department’s Graduate Studies Committee. Considering all other requirements are met, a minimum of 9 hours in graduate courses other than CHEM 7/8910, CHEM 7/8911, CHEM 7/8913, and CHEM 8001/9000 must be completed at the university.
  3. Residence — Of the total semester-hour requirement, a minimum of 24 hours must be earned while the student is at The University of Memphis. This requirement cannot be met wholly by attendance at Summer Sessions and must include at least one academic year of full-time student status.
  4. Comprehensive Examinations — The student must begin the written part of the comprehensive examinations in the third semester and take up to eight consecutive tests. These are described in the summary of the administration of the graduate program. A student pursuing the doctoral degree must obtain a total of at least twelve points. Any student who has not amassed twelve points at the completion of eight tests is automatically terminated from the doctoral degree program. Written permission from the student’s Advisory Committee is required to delay beginning the tests or to delay continuing once the student has begun taking tests. Within one year of obtaining the required twelve points, students should complete the oral part of the comprehensive examinations. The student will prepare a Research Prospectus on his or her thesis research problem, to be presented orally to the Advisory Committee in an open meeting and in a written form to the Advisory Committee and the Graduate Studies Committee. The oral comprehensive examination can be repeated only once. A student who changes major professors must present a new Research Prospectus within one semester after the change is made.
  5. Students who enter the PhD program and already hold the MS degree in chemistry should begin taking the cumulative examinations at the first opportunity after initial enrollment if a satisfactory score is made on the diagnostic examinations.
  6. Seminar — Participation in Seminar is required during each semester of residence (excluding summer terms).
  7. The Advisory Committee — Upon admission to the Graduate School, the student will be advised by the Department’s Graduate Studies Committee. A student must choose a major professor from the graduate faculty before the end of the first semester following enrollment. The major professor, in consultation with the student, will recommend faculty members to be appointed to the student’s Advisory Committee. This committee, which is appointed after the student's First Year Conference, must be composed of at least five members, with the major professor serving as chair. Of the members of this committee, at least one is to be from a different area of specialization from that in which the student intends to work. Upon appointment, the committee will review the student’s progress to date and outline an appropriate program tailored to the student’s interests to enable fulfillment of the degree requirements.The student will be regularly evaluated by their Advisor and Advisory Committee. In the unlikely event that a student changes major professors, a new Advisory Committee must be appointed.
  8. Admission to Candidacy — In order to apply for candidacy, the student must have an Advisory Committee and must have successfully completed the departmental comprehensive examination requirement. The written and oral portions of the comprehensive examinations (the oral exam replaces the research prospectus) collectively satisfy the comprehensive examination requirement of the Graduate School. The test scores, transcripts, and other pertinent data will be examined by the student’s Advisory Committee, and their recommendation, with the approval of the Graduate Studies Committee and the Department Chair, will be forwarded to the Graduate School.
  9. Doctoral Research and Dissertation — A minimum of six hours of CHEM 9000 is required for the doctoral degree. Registration for nine semester hours of CHEM 9000 and CHEM 8001 combined is required of all doctoral candidates before the dissertation will be considered. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
  10. Final Examination — The student’s Advisory Committee will administer a final oral examination on the student’s dissertation and related material after completion of all course requirements and the dissertation. This examination will be held two weeks or more after the student has distributed copies of the dissertation to the members of the Advisory Committee; which must be done at least five weeks before the end of the semester in which the student expects to graduate. If the final oral examination is unsatisfactory, it must be repeated within one year. It may not be repeated more than once.
  11. Retention — A student pursuing the doctoral degree program may be terminated for any of the following reasons:
    1. Failure to maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or above. A student who has a cumulative grade point average below 3.0 will be placed on probation. The Assistant Vice Provost for Graduate Studies must approve continuation in graduate school. Any person whose continuation is denied may appeal the decision to the University Council for Graduate Studies.
    2. Accumulation of more than six hours of graduate credit with grades of C or below.
    3. Failure to accumulate the requisite number of points on the departmental comprehensive examinations. (See Section 4).
    4. Failure to make satisfactory progress towards the degree in a timely fashion, as determined by the Departmental Program Retention Committee.
    5. Failure to satisfy the Advisory Committee on the final oral examination. (See Section 10).

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

In addition to the courses below, the department may offer the following Special Topics courses:
CHEM 6180-99. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (1-3). Topics are varied and announced in online list of classes.

CHEM 6280-99. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry. (1-3).
Topics are varied and announced in online course listings.

CHEM 6380-99. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. (1-3).
Topics are varied and announced in online course listings.

CHEM 6480-99. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. (1-3).
Topics are varied and announced in online course listings.

CHEM 6580-99. Special Topics in Biochemistry. (1-3).
Topics are varied and announced in online course listings.

CHEM 7100–09–8100-09. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (1-3).
Lectures and conferences covering selected areas of current interest (including equilibrium, titrimetric, electroanalytical, and spectral methods, separation and radio-chemical techniques, microanalysis, statistics and data analysis, and electrode kinetics). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

CHEM 7200-09–8200-09. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry. (1-3).
Lectures and conferences covering selected areas of current interest (including equilibrium, titrimetric, electroanalytical, and spectral methods, separation and radio-chemical techniques, microanalysis, statistics and data analysis, and electrode kinetics). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

CHEM 7300-09–8300-8309. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry. (1-3).
Lecture and conferences covering selected areas of current interest (including heterocyclic chemistry, organometallic compounds, organosulfur compounds, alkaloids, steroids, terpenes, photochemistry, biosynthesis, stereochemistry, carbohydrates, new synthetic methods, high polymers, and advanced physicalorganic chemistry). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

CHEM 7400-09–8400-09. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. (1-3).
Lectures and conferences covering selected areas of current interest (including non-aqueous solutions, surface chemistry, x-ray crystallography, theoretical spectroscopy, nuclear chemistry, molecular structure of macromolecules, colloid chemistry, statistical thermodynamics, esr, and nmr). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

CHEM 7500-09–8500-09. Special Topics in Biochemistry. (1-3).
Lectures and conferences covering selected areas of current interest (including enzymology, protein and nucleic acid chemistry, physical chemistry of biochemical macromolecules, lipid, carbohydrate, and amino acid metabolism, biochemical energetics, and metabolic regulation). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

CHEM 8700–09. Special Topics in Computational Chemistry. (1-3).
Lectures and conferences covering selected areas of current interest (including artificial intelligence methods, molecular computing, semi-empirical quantum mechanics, combinatorial chemistry, computer-aided drug design, analysis of chemical databases, correlated methods, chemometrics, and parallel computing). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.


CHEM 6001 - Environmental Chemistry (3)
Chemical phenomena occurring in soil, atmospheric, and aquatic environments; consideration of natural resources and environment. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3310 and CHEM 3211.

CHEM 6111 - Intermediate Inorganic CHEM (3)
Theoretical and applied inorganic chemistry, stressing the relationship of structure and bonding to the properties of elements and compounds; topics include introductory molecular orbital theory, coordination compounds and organometallics, ligand field theory, nonaqueous solvent systems, and reaction mechanisms. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3111 , or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 6201 - Instrumental Analysis Lab (1)
Application of techniques of instrumental analysis in areas of atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electroanalytical chemistry and chromatography. Three laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3211 with at least C-, or COREQUISITE: CHEM 4211.

CHEM 6211 - Instrumntl Analysis (3)
Topics in modern analytical instrumental analysis; atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electroanalytical chemistry and chromatograhpy. Three lectures hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3211 with at least C-.

CHEM 6311 - Physical Organic Chemistry (3)
Theory of electronic structure organic compounds, relation between structure and reactivity of organic compounds, mechanisms of common organic reactions. Three lecture hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3310 and 3511 with at least a C-. Repeat no more than two times.

CHEM 6315 - Organic Medicinal Chem (3)
Introduction to principles of medicinal chemistry; structure, synthesis, and biochemical mechanism of action of major drug classes. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3511.

CHEM 6406 - Molecular Spectroscopy Lab (1)
Determination of molecular structure of compounds using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Three laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3301 with at least C-. PREREQUISITE or COREQUISITE: CHEM 6416.

CHEM 6411 - Advanced Physical Chem (3)
Advanced topics in physical chemistry, including statistical mechanics and thermodynamics plus selected topics in kinetic theory of gases, condensed phases, and non-equilibrium processes. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 6415 - Computational Chemistry (3)
Application of computers to problems in organic and inorganic chemistry; use of quantum chemistry codes to solve problems related to electronic, molecular, and vibrational structure. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 6416 - Molecular Spectroscopy (3)
Theory, instrumentation and applications of NMR, FT-IR, mass spectrometry, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Application and theory of other spectroscopic methods will be discussed briefly. Three lecture hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3310 and 3411.

CHEM 6501 - Lab Tech In Biochem (2)
(Same as BIOL 6503). Biochemical techniques, analysis and design strategies; emphasis on properties of proteins/enzymes, including binding, catalysis, kinetics, electron and proton transport processes of intermediate metabolism; purification, characterization, and assay of enzymes using chromatography, spectroscopy, electrophoresis. Six laboratory hours per week; $50 material fee. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3501; PREREQUISITE OR COREQUISITE: CHEM 6511.

CHEM 6511 - Biochemistry I (3)
(Same as BIOL 6511). Chemistry of amino acids and proteins as related to their properties in biochemical systems; protein conformation studies; enzymology; coenzymes and their functions; importance of pH and bioenergetics in catalysis; protein and carbohydrate metabolism. Three lecture hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3511 with at least a C-.

CHEM 6512 - Biochemistry II (3)
(Same as BIOL 6512). Continuation of CHEM 6511; chemistry of lipids: metabolism, membrane formation and function in cell signaling mechanisms and sensory transduction; chemistry of nucleotides, DNA, and RNA; mechanisms of information storage and transmission; advanced treatment of enzyme kinetics. Three lecture hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6511or BIOL 6511 with at least a C-.

CHEM 6603 - Materials Synthesis Lab (1)
Practical application of modern chemical synthesis; experimental studies in synthetic organic, organometallic, inorganic, polymer, and nanomaterial chemistry. Three laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3301. PREREQUISITE or COREQUISITE: CHEM 4613

CHEM 6604 - Instrumental Methods (3)
Analytical instrumental techniques including molecular spectroscopy, chromatography, atomic spectroscopy, and electrochemical analysis. Two lecture, three laboratory hours per week; $25 material fee. PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor.

CHEM 6613 - Materials Synthesis (3)
Principles, methods and applications of modern chemical synthesis; organic, organometellic, inorganic, polymer, and nanomaterial synthetic reactions and techniques; multi-step and interdisciplinary synthesis. Three lecture hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3111 and CHEM 3310.

CHEM 6614 - Polymer Chemistry (3)
Fundamental concepts in polymer chemistry and polymer physics with focus on synthesis, characterization, structure and properties of polymeric materials. Three lecture hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3310 and CHEM 3411.

CHEM 6615 - Biophysical Chemistry (3)
Study of biomolecular structures and properties; emphasis on biophysical techniques applicable to study of biomolecular structures and properties. Three lecture hours per week. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 3411 and 3510.

CHEM 7001 - Directed Research (1-10)
An original investigation undertaken with the supervision of a member of the graduate staff to be the basis of a contribution to the chemical literature. May be repeated for a maximum of 30 credit hours.

CHEM 7111 - Systematic Inor Chem (3)
Survey of inorganic chemistry, including electronic structure, bonding, stereochemistry, symmetry, and the physical and chemical properties of the elements and their compounds. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6111 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7211 - Adv Analytical Chem I (3)
Advanced treatment of topics in atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and surface analysis techniques. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6211 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7212 - Adv Analytical Chem II (3)
Advanced treatment of topics in electrochemical methods and separation techniques. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6211 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7311 - Adv Organic Chemistry (3)
Physical approach to organic reaction mechanisms; reactive intermediates, aromaticity, and pericyclic reactions; introduction to advanced spectroscopic techniques and synthetic philosophy. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6311 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7312 - Synthetic Organic Chem (3)
Principles of synthesis of complex organic molecules. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6311 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7314 - Heterocyclic Chemistry (3)
Reactions, synthesis, uses, and physical properties of heterocyclic compounds.

CHEM 7411 - Elect Structure & Sym (3)
Basic quantum chemistry with applications to simple systems; group theory and its applications; molecular orbital theory including Huckel, SCF-LCAO-MO, and Qualitative MO methods. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7414 - Adv Quantum Chemistry (3)
Advanced treatment of topics in quantum chemistry with emphasis on electronic structure theories.

CHEM 7600 - Intro Grad Study Chem (2)
Laboratory instruction emphasizing communication skills, laboratory conduct and safety, and evaluation of performance. Two laboratory hours per week. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 7711 - Approx Chem Model Meth (3)
Development of approximate classical and quantum mechanical techniques for modeling chemical systems, molecular mechanics, semiempirical quantum mechanics. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 7411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7713 - Adv Solid St Phys/Chem (3)
Quantum mechanical treatment of electronic and vibrational states of metals, semiconductors and insulators, transport phenomena, superconductivity, physics of defects in solids. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 7411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 7910 - Spec Prob In Chem (1-12)
Individual investigation and report under the guidance of the student's major advisor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 7911 - Presentation (1)
Preparation and presentation of a short talk or lecture based on a laboratory or library project. Topic chosen in consultation with advisor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 7913 - Chemistry Seminar (1)
Formal meetings, presentation, and discussion of current topics of interest; students, faculty, and visiting scientists participate. Required of all regularly enrolled graduate students. A maximum of 4 credit hours from a combination of CHEM 6911, 7911, 8911, and 7-8913 may be counted toward the degree. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 7996 - Thesis (1-6)
An original investigation undertaken with the supervision of a member of the graduate staff. The investigation will be the basis of a thesis. A maximum of 6 credit hours can be counted toward the thesis Master's degree. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 8001 - Directed Research (1-10)
An original investigation undertaken with the supervision of a member of the graduate staff to be the basis of a contribution to the chemical literature. May be repeated for a maximum of 30 credit hours.

CHEM 8111 - Systematic Inor Chem (3)
Survey of inorganic chemistry, including electronic structure, bonding, stereochemistry, symmetry, and the physical and chemical properties of the elements and their compounds. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6111 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8112 - Structural Inor Chem (3)
Principles and applications of spectroscopic and physical methods to the solution of inorganic and organometallic problems, including electronic absorption spectra, photoelectron spectra, resonance Raman, NMR, EPR, Mossbauer Spectroscopy, EXAFS/XANES, X-ray diffraction. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6111 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8211 - Adv Analytical Chem I (3)
Advanced treatment of topics in atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and surface analysis techniques. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6211 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8212 - Adv Analytical Chem II (3)
Advanced treatment of topics in electrochemical methods and separation techniques. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6211 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8311 - Adv Organic Chemistry (3)
Physical approach to organic reaction mechanisms; reactive intermediates, aromaticity, and pericyclic reactions; introduction to advanced spectroscopic techniques and synthetic philosophy. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6311 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8312 - Synthetic Organic Chem (3)
Principles of synthesis of complex organic molecules. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6311 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8314 - Heterocyclic Chemistry (3)
Reactions, synthesis, uses, and physical properties of heterocyclic compounds.

CHEM 8405 - Adv Biophysical Chemistry (3)
Advanced study of biomolecular structures, properties and mechanism; Emphasis on how to utilize various techniques to study biological properties and mechanism. This course utilizes mixed-mode instruction. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8411 - Elect Structure & Sym (3)
Basic quantum chemistry with applications to simple systems; group theory and its applications; molecular orbital theory including Huckel, SCF-LCAO-MO, and Qualitative MO methods. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 6411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8414 - Adv Quantum Chemistry (3)
Advanced treatment of topics in quantum chemistry with emphasis on electronic structure theories.

CHEM 8711 - Approx Chem Model Meth (3)
Development of approximate classical and quantum mechanical techniques for modeling chemical systems, molecular mechanics, semiempirical quantum mechanics. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 7411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8713 - Adv Solid St Phys/Chem (3)
Quantum mechanical treatment of electronic and vibrational states of metals, semiconductors and insulators, transport phenomena, superconductivity, physics of defects in solids. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 7411 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 8910 - Spec Prob In Chem (1-12)
Individual investigation and report under the guidance of the student's major advisor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 8911 - Advanced Presentation (1)
Preparation and presentation of one-hour lecture as regularly scheduled department seminar. Topic chosen in consultation with advisor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 8913 - Chemistry Seminar (1)
Formal meetings, presentation, and discussion of current topics of interest; students, faculty, and visiting scientists participate. Required of all regularly enrolled graduate students. A maximum of 4 credit hours from a combination of CHEM 6911, 7911, 8911, and 7-8913 may be counted toward the degree. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

CHEM 9000 - Dissertation (1-10)
A maximum of 32 dissertation hours is permitted. A minimum of 6 credit hours is required for the doctoral degree. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

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