Graduate Catalog
English

Room 467, Patterson Hall
(901) 678-2651

JEFFREY SCRABA, PhD
Coordinator of Graduate Studies
(901) 678-4768

E-mail: jscraba@memphis.edu
www.memphis.edu/english

I. The Department of English offers programs of study leading to the Master of Arts degree, the Master of Fine Arts degree, and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Entering students will consult with a departmental advisor to plan their course of study. Students in the MA program will choose one concentration from the five offered: Composition Studies, Language and Linguistics, Literature, Professional Writing, or English as a Second Language. Students in the PhD program will choose one of four concentrations: Composition Studies, Professional Writing, Applied Linguistics, or Literary and Cultural Studies.

Program objectives are: (1) development of skills to engage in original research or original creative writing for publication or for positions in education or industry; (2) development of advanced competencies in teaching language or literature and presentation of works to others; and (3) understanding and contributing to contemporary issues and debates in the chosen concentration.

 All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued.

PPI STATEMENT
All college transcripts and test score information should be sent directly to Graduate Admissions. Beginning with Summer and Fall 2013 admittance, the Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts, and Doctoral programs in the Department of English require the ETS® Personal Potential Index (PPI) Evaluation Report containing a minimum of three (3) evaluations from separate evaluators in order to consider your application complete. The PPI is a third-party evaluative tool administered by the ETS (Educational Testing Service) organization. There is no fee to submit the PPI report to the University of Memphis.

You can create an ETS PPI account and review the ETS PPI Information Bulletin, which explains the service, at http://www.ets.org/ppi/applicants/start/.

PPI - Steps At A Glance

  • Create an ETS PPI account to begin the process.
  • Provide contact information for the evaluators you would like to complete an ETS PPI evaluation.
  • ETS sends an email to each evaluator inviting them to access the ETS PPI system and complete your evaluation.
  • Each evaluator logs in to the ETS PPI system to rate you on six personal attributes and provide an overall evaluation. Evaluators also may provide optional comments for each attribute as well as for the overall rating.
  • You are notified via e-mail when each time that one of your evaluators completes their PPI.
  • **THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP** After all of your evaluators have completed their PPI reports, you must log back into your PPI account, designate the University of Memphis Office of Graduate Admissions to receive an ETS PPI Evaluation Report and select the evaluations that are to be included in the report. Our office cannot access your PPI recommendations until you complete this step.
  • Once you designate the University of Memphis to receive an ETS PPI Evaluation Report, ETS creates an evaluation report and sends it electronically to the University of Memphis, Office of Graduate Admissions. Allow up to 5 days for the report to be processed and sent to the University of Memphis. View a sample PPI Report.

The evaluators/faculty members who you choose should be individuals that you believe are best able to objectively comment on your intellectual and professional achievements and potential.

We may call or write your recommenders for more information.

II. MA in English Degree Program

A. Admission

  1. An overall minimum grade point average of 3.00 at the undergraduate level is expected.
  2. A competitive score on the Graduate Record Examination.
  3. An official undergraduate and if applicable graduate transcript to Graduate Admissions.

B. Program Prerequisites

An undergraduate degree with a major in English. A student who does not have an undergraduate major in English or appropriate background may be required to complete a maximum of 12 upper division hours in English with a grade of B or higher in each course.

C. Program Requirements

  1. a. Students in Literature, ESL, or Linguistics must complete a total of thirty (30) semester hours of course work plus a three-hour thesis, or a total of thirty-three (33) semester hours of course work. All students must complete a four-hour comprehensive written examination.
    b. Students in Professional Writing must complete a required four-hour comprehensive exam and produce either a thesis or project or portfolio. The exam must be passed before the student can register for thesis hours.
  2. Students in ESL, Linguistics, Professional Writing and Composition Studies must complete two graduate courses (six semester hours) outside their area of concentration.
  3. Students must complete the following minimum course work, beyond the requirement in section 2, in at least one of these concentrations:
    1. Composition Studies—18 hours;
      1. MA students pursuing an emphasis in Composition Studies must complete a 15-hour core consisting of ENGL 7001, 7003, 7806, and 7822.
    2. Language and Linguistics—18 hours including ENGL 7511 or equivalent graduate or undergraduate introduction to linguistics approved by student's advisor;
    3. Professional Writing—18 hours
      1. The Professional Writing concentration requires a 3-hour thesis, project, or portfolio.
      2. Professional Writing students will complete their 18 hours as follows: 7001, 7805, 7806 and 7809, and two courses selected from the following: 6618, 6619, 7013, 7014, 7807, 7808, and 7818.
    4. Literature—18 hours, including 7000 (excluding 7100); Students must take at least one literature course from before 1800 and one literature course from after 1800, and at least one Literary Theory class, which may be chosen from any designated theory class, including 7/8477, 7/8478, 7/8701, 7/8702, and 7/8480. All students must take a four-hour written comprehensive examination. Literature students should take ENGL 7000 in the first year of graduate study.
    5. English as a Second Language—18 hours, including ENGL 7531.

NOTE: Courses numbered 7004, 7005, 7006, 7812, and 7813 require approval of the Chair of the Department and Coordinator of Graduate Studies in order to be applied toward any concentration.

  1. Students in Composition Studies will take a written comprehensive exam and complete either a thesis or professional portfolio. Students should contact the English Graduate Office for examination format and dates.
  2. Reading knowledge of a foreign language for students in Literature and Linguistics. Proficiency may be demonstrated in a variety of ways (inquire in English Graduate Office for options). Students intending to pursue a PhD are advised to develop a reading competency in at least one of the following: French, German, Latin, or Greek.
  3. Thesis (ENGL 7996) Optional, except for the concentration in Professional Writing.
    NOTE: Students electing to write a thesis should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
  4. An average of 3.00 in all graduate English courses.
  5. Each graduate teaching assistant in the Department of English must enroll in English 7003-8003 before or concurrent with first teaching assignment.

D. Retention Requirements

Students who are on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Upon entering the MA program, a student chooses an advisor in his or her concentration. The advisor will monitor the student's progress toward completion of the degree. Each semester the Graduate Studies Committee will examine the academic progress of all students for retention in the program.

If a student receives either two C's, one D, or one F grade in any English graduate level course, that student will be subject to review and could be dismissed from the program. In order to remain in good standing, all graduate students must maintain a 3.0 average in English Department courses.

III. Accelerated B.A./M.A. Program in English

This program allows outstanding undergraduates to begin the coursework for the Master of Arts in English during their senior year. Students are encouraged to begin planning to enter the Accelerated B.A./M.A. program early in their undergraduate career, in consultation with their advisor in the Department of English.

Working with the undergraduate and graduate academic coordinators, undergraduates selected into this program begin a carefully tailored course of study that will allow them to complete their B.A. degree while also begin the coursework toward their M.A.

To apply, students should have a minimum 3.25 grade point average, and must submit two reference letters and a copy of their transcript to the English department. Exceptions to the minimum GPA will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Each applicant will complete an interview with the graduate coordinator in English.

Students must also apply to the Graduate School for “combination senior” status, which allows them to take graduate courses in English. To continue in the program past the B.A., students must apply for admission into the Graduate School.

Up to 9 hours of graduate course work may be applied to both the undergraduate and graduate programs.

IV. MFA in Creative Writing Degree Program

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing provides studies in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, along with a variety of options for either a studio degree in Creative Writing, or a degree combining work in either the Department of English or other departments in which course work, or independent study, seems particularly pertinent to the student's creative thesis. A book-length thesis of publishable quality is required; it will be directed by a member of the MFA faculty. The MFA requires 48 graduate semester hours, with a 3.00 grade point average in all graduate courses.

A. Admission

  1. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.75 at the undergraduate level.
  2. An official undergraduate and if applicable graduate transcript sent to Graduate Admissions.
  3. A portfolio of published or unpublished writing samples in the applicant's chosen genre (at least 20-25 pages of fiction, 10 poems, or 25 pages of nonfiction), demonstrating a potential for development to a professional standard of writing, should be submitted to the English Graduate Office along with two letters of recommendation and a cover letter stating the candidate’s choice of genre and reasons for pursuing the degree. The writing sample will be evaluated by a committee of MFA faculty. The committee will recommend admission of those applicants with the highest demonstrated talent.
  4. Students who wish to change genres after being accepted in one genre, even if they are already registered and enrolled in the program, must submit a new portfolio of work in the new genre and be approved by the MFA faculty for admission in the new genre.
  5. Baccalaureate degree in English or if baccalaureate is in another field, twelve (12) semester hours in upper division literature or creative writing courses with a minimum grade point average of 2.75 in these courses.
  6. Graduate Record General Examination (a competitive score on the verbal section is expected).
  7. Deadlines: for best consideration apply by January 15 for the following fall semester admission and October 15 for following spring semester. Applications may be considered later but prospective students applying by those dates have first priority.

B. MA Credit

Any applicant who holds an MA degree in English may apply up to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours in English earned for that degree toward the MFA degree, with the approval of the graduate coordinator. A student's advisor will insure that the combination of MA credits and courses taken in the program has appropriate breadth. Credit previously earned at another institution must be presented for evaluation not later than the end of the student’s second semester of enrollment.

C. Program Requirements

All students must fulfill the 48-hour degree requirement from the Core Requirements in section 1 in combination with one area of specialization under the Additional Requirements in section 2: the Studio Option, the Literary Studies Option, The Creative/Professional Option, the TESL/TEFL Option, or the Cross-Disciplinary Option.

  1. Core Requirements
    1. Writing Workshops and Forms Courses — A total of six courses, of at least 3 hours each, required:
      four courses from 7601, 7602, 7603, 7605, 7606, and 7607, at least 3 of which must be in chosen genre;
      one forms class (7470, 7471, or 7472) in chosen genre;
      and one cross-genre course: (6610, 7470, 7471, 7601, or 7602 for poets), (6610, 7472 or 7603 for fiction writers and creative nonfiction writers). 6610 may serve as a cross-genre course if the focus was on a cross-genre, but the student must submit a portfolio of cross-genre work from the course and get written approval from the Creative Writing Coordinator.
    2. Creative Writing Colloquium ENGL 7900. At least two sections of 7900 must be taken, each for at least 3 hours.
    3. Thesis (ENGL 7996), three (3) semester hours. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
    4. A Comprehensive Exam based on a reading list formed by the student and the student's thesis director.
    5. Oral review of thesis.

NOTE: Although it is not a core requirement for the degree, all students receiving a Teaching Assistantship must take ENGL 7003 either before they become a teaching assistant or during their first semester of teaching. It is included as an alternative course in each of the options for additional requirements below.

  1. Additional Requirements: 7 courses, of at least 3 hours each, chosen from one of the following options:
    1. Studio Option: twenty-one (21) hours chosen from the following:
      6610, 7470, 7471, 7472, 7475, 7485, 7601, 7602, 7603, 7604, 7605, 7606, and 7607.
      Students may take, as an alternative to replace up to 3 of these courses, an equivalent number of other courses (of 3 hours or more each) from other disciplines within the Department of English (this includes ENGL 7003, which is a requirement if the student receives a Teaching Assistantship).Note: as stated in the course descriptions, 7475 and 7485 can only be counted for a maximum of 6 hours each toward the degree requirements.
    2. Literary Studies Option: twenty-one (21) hours made up of the following:
      at least 9 hours of Literature Courses;
      at least 3 hours of Theory of Writing and English Language/Linguistics Courses (selected from ENGL 7020-29, 7003, 7501, 7511 through 7517, 7531 through 7537, 7590, 7801, 7802, 7803, and 7805);
      up to 6 hours of ENGL 7475 Literary Editing;
      up to 6 hours of ENGL 7485 Literary Arts Programming;
      up to 9 hours of Forms Courses: ENGL 6610, 7470, 7471, 7472.
    3. Creative/Professional Writing Option: twenty-one (21) hours selected from the following:
      Professional Writing Courses (6618, 6619, 7013, 7014, 7805, 7806, 7807, 7808, 7809, 7816, 7818, and 7890);
      ENGL 7003;
      up to 6 hours each of Literary Editing or Arts Programming Courses (ENGL 7475, 7485);
      up to 6 hours of internship, ENGL 7811. NOTE: all internships must be pre-approved by the coordinator of the Creative Writing program along with another professor in the student’s primary genre.
    4. TESL/TEFL Option: MFA students may fulfill the 21 optional hours beyond the core by taking 6 elective graduate hours in any area of English, Creative Writing, or Foreign Languages and by completing in addition the 15 hours required for the Certificate Program in Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TESL/TEFFL). (see section VI for additional details)
      Program Requirements:
      1. The certificate program requires completion of fifteen (15) semester credit hours.
      2. Twelve (12) credit hours must be met by satisfactory completion of the following courses:
        1. ENGL 7531 Theory and History of ESL (3 Hours)
        2. ENGL 7532 Principles of Skills Assessment (3 Hours)
        3. ENGL 7535 ESL Grammar (3 Hours)
        4. ENGL 7530 Field Experience and Practicum in ESL (3 Hours)
      3. Three (3) elective hours may be selected from:
        1. ENGL 7533 Methods and Techniques of ESL in K-12 (3 Hours)
        2. ENGL 7536 Issues in Second Language Writing (3 Hours)
        3. ENGL 7537 Issues in Second Language Reading (3 Hours)
        4. ENGL 7538 Cultural Issues in ESL (3 Hours)
        5. ENGL 6533 Issues and Techniques in English as a Foreign Language (3 Hours)
      4. Note: Those also seeking ESL add-on endorsement must complete ENGL 7533 and ENGL7538. Praxis II for ESL is also required for the add-on endorsement.
    5. Cross-Disciplinary Option: twenty-one (21) hours selected from the following: up to 3 English graduate courses from any discipline (includes ENGL 7003); and at least 12 hours of graduate courses from another department: Art, History, Journalism, Theater, Foreign Languages, or other department in which course work, or independent study, seems particularly pertinent to the student’s creative thesis.
      Up to 9 of the 21 hours may be fulfilled by independent study in another department and/or internship hours, but all cross-disciplinary courses/independent studies/internships must be pre-approved by the coordinator of the Creative Writing program along with another professor in the student’s primary genre. Internships must be of a nature that will allow the student to participate in research that will form the basis of the student’s thesis.
      Note: Although taking all 12 hours of the cross-disciplinary minimum in only one other department is not required, it is recommended that the student focus primarily on one area or else have a clear rationale for fulfilling the 12-hour minimum in more than one cross-disciplinary area.

D. Retention Requirements

Upon entering the MFA program, a student chooses an advisor in his or her concentration. The advisor will monitor the student's progress toward completion of the degree. Each semester the Graduate Studies Committee will examine the academic progress of all students for retention in the program. If a student receives either two C's, one D, or one F grade in any English graduate level course, that student will be subject to review and could be dismissed from the program. In order to remain in good standing, all graduate students must maintain a 3.0 average in all courses. Students who are on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program.

V. PhD in English: Writing and Language Studies Degree Program

The PhD in English is designed to prepare scholars in widely recognized fields of English, as well as to prepare advanced writing specialists in the fields of business and industry. The structure of the program provides for four related concentrations (Composition Studies, Professional Writing, Applied Linguistics, Literary and Cultural Studies) that offer students the professional flexibility that comes with competencies acquired through preparation in a broadly integrative discipline.

A. Admission

The following are required for admission to the PhD program in English for all applicants, whether applying with a bachelor’s or master’s degree.

  1. Fulfillment of University requirements for admission to the Graduate School.
  2. Official undergraduate and graduate transcript(s) sent to Graduate Admissions.
  3. A competitive GRE verbal score. In addition, international students for whom English is not their first language typically submit a score of 575 or above on paper (or computer equivalent) on the TOEFL exam.
  4. A bachelor’s or master’s degree from an accredited college or university in the United States, usually with a major or a strong minor in English, or the equivalent of one of these degrees in another country.
  5. Minimum undergraduate and graduate grade point average of 3.25 is expected.
  6. Evidence of competence in writing in English as evidenced by a statement of purpose and a sample of the applicant’s best work.
  7. Three letters of recommendation, preferably from college/university professors of English or comparable disciplines.
  8. Program Admission: We normally evaluate applicants for the PhD program once each year in January for admission in the Fall semester. Although the Graduate Studies Committee may consider the application of a promising student at other times, January 15 is the deadline by which we must receive all the application materials of anyone who wishes to be considered for an assistantship for the following academic year.

B. Retention Requirements

Upon entering the PhD program, a student chooses an advisor in his or her concentration. The advisor will monitor the student’s progress towards completion of the degree. Each semester, the Graduate Studies Committee will examine the academic progress of all students for retention in the program. If a student receives either two C's, one D, or one F grade in any English graduate level course, that student will be subject to review and could be dismissed from the program. In order to remain in good standing, all graduate students must maintain a 3.0 average in English Department courses. Students who are on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program.

C. Graduation Requirements

  1. General Requirements
    1. A minimum of 72 hours of graduate credit beyond the bachelor’s degree is required. At least 60 hours of credit must be equivalent to 7000-level coursework or higher.
    2. Students entering the PhD program with a master’s degree may count up to 33 hours of graduate credit toward the 72 hours needed for the PhD. Only graduate hours that were not used for a previous graduate degree and that do not exceed university time restrictions can be transferred. Credit previously earned at another institution must be presented for evaluation not later than the end of the student’s second semester of enrollment.
    3. Master’s level courses will be examined on an individual basis for applicability to the program. Students with a master’s degree must complete at least 39 hours of graduate coursework beyond that master’s degree.
    4. No more than 9 hours granted for dissertation work may be used to attain the required 72 hours for the PhD.
  2. Residency Requirements. The student must complete two successive terms full-time (excluding summer sessions) to fulfill residency requirements.
  3. Core Requirements. Students must take 12 hours in English courses outside of their concentration or focus area, plus 3 hours in English Studies Colloquium (ENGL 8900).
  4. Concentration Requirements (beyond Core Requirements)
    1. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Composition Studies must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of ENGL 7/8003, 7/8801, 7/8806, and 7/8822; and 21 hours in Composition.
    2. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Professional Writing Studies must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of ENGL 7/8805, 7/8806, 7/8809, 7/8350; and 21 hours in Professional Writing.
    3. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Applied Linguistics must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of ENGL 7531/8531, ENGL 7511/8511, ENGL 7501/8501 and 3 hours in an approved research course; and 21 hours of courses in Applied Linguistics.
    4. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Literary and Cultural Studies will choose a focus area from the following:
      • Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture;
      • 18th c. and 19th c. Literature and Culture;
      • Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture;
      • African-American Literature and Culture;
      • Individual Option (defined by student in consultation with advisor)

    Students must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of 3 hours of course work in each of the first four focal areas; 9 hours in theory and methodology (including 3 hours in 7000/8000, and 6 hours from: 7/8336, 7/8477, 7/8478, 7/8480, 7/8701, 7/8702); 15 hours in the focus area (not counting course taken for breadth requirement.

  5. Electives. PhD students in Literary and Cultural Studies are required to take 12 hours of electives; PhD students in other concentrations are required to take 15 hours; courses may be taken outside the department in consultation with advisor.
  6. Examination Requirements
    1. Qualifying Examinations—Students entering without a master’s degree in English or 30 hours of appropriate graduate work, as determined by the Graduate Coordinator, must take a qualifying examination the semester after accumulating 30 hours of graduate work through graduate transfer credit and/or graduate courses completed at The University of Memphis. Qualifying examinations are designed to ascertain that the range of knowledge is appropriate at this level. These written exams will be tailored to the individual student’s course of study. The Graduate Coordinator will appoint an appropriate committee with expertise in the course of study. The qualifying exams are equivalent to the MA comprehensive exams. The MA comprehensive exams test the student's course work; however, the MA comprehensive exams in Composition Studies and Professional Writing also include a reading list. Examinations are graded high pass, pass, or fail. Students who pass the exam will be allowed to advance to doctoral-level study. However, a student who fails one section of the qualifying examination will be given one opportunity during the same semester or not later than the following semester to retake that section with a different question. A student who fails more than one exam question will be given an opportunity to take a different exam no later than the following semester.
    2. MA en route- Students entering without a master’s degree in English will be awarded an MA degree at the completion of the qualifying exam and 33 hours of appropriate work.
    3. Comprehensive Examinations—After completing the rest of their required courses, after satisfying their language and/or research requirement, and before they begin writing their dissertations, students must pass comprehensive examinations in accordance with concentration guidelines. The student must first form a comprehensive exam committee. The Ph.D. comprehensive exam committee for both the written and oral exams will consist of a minimum of four faculty members. The student will choose an advisor from his / her concentration who will be the chair of the committee. In consultation with the advisor, the student will choose two other members from the concentration and at least one faculty member from outside the concentration.
      There will be three written comprehensive exams and one oral exam.
      1. One four-hour proctored written exam will cover the Ph.D. student’s concentration. The objective of this exam is to demonstrate that the student has a command of 75-100 seminal texts, in his or her concentration, that are not, for the most part, included in the reading list for exam # 2. This list will be determined by each committee.
      2. A second proctored four-hour written exam will allow students to demonstrate that they have enough background / reading knowledge to qualify them to teach upper division and graduate courses in the student’s chosen area of specialization within the concentration. This area will be determined by the student in conjunction with his or her committee. The student will develop the reading list in conjunction with his or her advisor and / or committee, and the reading list for this portion of this exam will consist of between 50-75 texts (i.e., books, book chapters, and / or articles).
      3. A third written exam, a take-home exam, must consist of 3,500-5,000 words that test the student’s command of his or her knowledge of his or her proposed dissertation area. The objective of this exam is for the student to demonstrate that he or she has enough background / reading knowledge and an ability to write a sophisticated essay concerning a literature review of the student’s prospective dissertation area. This essay will cite at least 20-25 texts. The take-home exam should take no more than seven (7) days to complete.
        To allow time to study for the exams, students should take their first written exam within two semesters after completing all Ph.D. coursework (including the foreign language requirements). Students could then take one exam per week over three weeks. A student will have a maximum of two months to complete all of the comprehensive exams.
      4. After the written exams have been completed and graded, there will be a two-hour oral exam based upon the written exams.
      5. A student who fails one section of the comprehensive examination will be given one opportunity during the same semester or not later than the following semester to retake that section. A student who fails more than one section of the exam will be given an opportunity to take a different exam (with all new questions) no later than the following semester. A student who fails the second comprehensive exam will be dismissed from the program.
  7. Language Requirements
    1. Students in Applied Linguistics and Literary and Cultural Studies must demonstrate a reading knowledge of two foreign languages or fluency in one foreign language. Appropriate languages must be approved by the student's advisor and the graduate coordinator as relevant to the student's course of study.
    2. Students in Composition and Professional Writing must demonstrate competency with two research tools or analytic specialties, both of which must be directly relevant to the individual student's dissertation work and projected short-term professional goals. These tools or analytical specialties include a demonstrated level of competency in two foreign languages, fluency in one foreign language, or competency in one foreign language plus mastery of qualitative, quantitative, or historical research methodologies, or demonstrated competency with appropriate computer programs. See "Options for Fulfilling the Foreign Language Requirement," available from the department.
  8. Dissertation Requirements
    1. Advisory Committee—The student is responsible for choosing an advisory committee composed of at least four members of the graduate faculty best qualified to help him or her conduct research for the dissertation. If the student’s research requires expertise in a discipline outside the Department of English, the student, in consultation with his or her advisory committee chair, may ask up to one faculty member outside the Department of English to be part of the committee.
    2. Research Proposal—When the student has passed the comprehensive examinations and has done extensive preliminary research, he or she must present and defend a research proposal before the advisory committee. That defense will be open to the entire academic community. The student must give a copy of the proposal to all committee members at least two weeks before the scheduled meeting. The advisory committee must approve the proposal before the student may proceed with the dissertation. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
    3. Defense—The dissertation committee will schedule a defense of the completed dissertation. Both the chair of the advisory committee and the candidate must ensure adequate consultation with members of the dissertation committee well in advance of the defense date.

VI. Certificate Program in Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TESL/TEFL)

The TESL/TEFL Graduate Certificate provides training to those interested in teaching English as a Second/ Foreign Language. The certificate is given for to those who complete the practical preparation needed to teach English both within and outside the United States to post-secondary students and adults. The specific courses for the certificate include the specific knowledge and skills specified for ESL teachers and identified by TESOL, Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. Students have the option of completing the program on-line. Click here to view corresponding gainful employment data.

Note: The Certificate in Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language is not a program to prepare K-12 ESL teachers. Pre-service and in-service teachers seeking an ESL certificate and an add-on endorsement in ESL for K-12 should contact the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences for details.

A. Admission Requirements

  1. Applicants should hold either an MA degree in any field or a BA degree in any field with a GPA of at least 2.75.
  2. International students must have a TOEFL score of 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 79 (internet-based).
  3. Applicants must submit a one-page personal statement and two letters of recommendation to the English Department.
  4. Since 12 credit hours in the certificate program may also count toward the MA degree, it is expected that many fully-admitted students will earn the certificate on their way to the MA degree. Certificate students wishing to earn the MA must make formal application for the master's program following all guidelines specified by the English Department and the University.

B. Program Requirements

  1. The certificate program requires completion of fifteen (15) semester credit hours.
  2. Twelve (12) credit hours must be met by satisfactory completion of the following core courses:
    1. ENGL 7531 Theory and History of ESL (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7532 Principles of Skills Assessment (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7535 ESL Grammar (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7530 Field Experience and Practicum in ESL (3 hours)
  3. Three (3) elective hours may be selected from:
    1. ENGL 7533 Method/Techniques of ESL in K-12 (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7536 Issues in Second Language Writing (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7537 Issues in Second Language Reading (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7538 Cultural Issues in ESL (3 hours)
    5. ENGL 6533 Issues and Techniques in English as a Foreign Language (3 hours)
  4. Note: Those also seeking ESL add-on endorsement must complete ENGL 7533 and ENGL 7538. Praxis II for ESL is also required for the add-on endorsement.

C. Retention Requirements
Same as retention policies applicable to Department of English graduate degree programs.

D. Graduation Requirements
Relatively early in the semester in which they intend to graduate, certificate candidates must file an Intent to Graduate Card with the Graduate School and a Candidacy form with the Graduate Coordinator for English.

VII. Certificate Program in African American Literature

The African American Literature certificate provides training to students interested in teaching African American Literature. The goal of the training is to 1) provide students with the preparation they need to teach African American Literature, and 2) give official recognition of preparation to help students qualify for jobs both within and outside the United States.

A. Admission Requirements

  1. Students eligible to take courses as non-degree seeking students at the University of Memphis can complete the certificate requirements.
  2. Applicants should send a letter of intent and two letters of recommendation to the Department of English Graduate Office. Applicants need to apply to both the University of Memphis Graduate School and the Department of English Graduate Office.
  3. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.75 in English or a related area is recommended at the undergraduate level.
  4. Since up to 12 credit hours from the certificate program may count toward the M.A., M.F.A., or Ph.D. degrees, it is expected that many already-admitted students will earn the certificate on their way to the M.A., M.F.A., or Ph.D. degree. Such students wishing to earn the Certificate must notify the Department of English Graduate Coordinator in writing.

B. Program Requirements

  1. The certificate program requires completion of fifteen (15) semester credit hours.
  2. Twelve (12) credit hours must be met by satisfactory completion of any four (4) of the following core courses:
    1. ENGL 7325 African American Literature, 1930-1960 (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7326 African American Literature of Memphis and the Mid-South (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7327 Studies in Form and Genre: African American Literature (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7328 Studies in Major Authors: African American Literature (3 hours)
    5. ENGL 7329 African American Literature, Beginnings to 1850 (3 hours)
    6. ENGL 7330 African American Literature, 1850-1900 (3 hours)
    7. ENGL 7331 Frederick Douglass (3 hours)
    8. ENGL 7332 Literature of the African Diaspora (3 hours)
    9. ENGL 7333 Amiri Baraka (3 hours)
    10. ENGL 7334 The Black Arts Movement (3 hours)
    11. ENGL 7335 African American Literature, 1989-Present (3 hours)
    12. ENGL 7336 African American Literary Theory (3 hours)
    13. ENGL 7465 African American Literature 1960 to 1988 (3 hours)
    14. ENGL 7468 Literature of the Harlem Renaissance (3 hours)
    15. ENGL 7469 African American Women Writers (3 hours)
  3. Three (3) elective hours may be selected from one of the following courses, provided it has an African American Literature component:
    1. ENGL 7323 American Literature to 1865 (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7324 American Literature, 1865-1914 (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7391 Modern American Novel (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7392 American Poetry (3 hours)
    5. ENGL 7393 American Drama (3 hours)
    6. ENGL 7464 Contemporary American Literature (3 hours)

C. Retention Requirements
Same as retention policies applicable to Department of English graduate degree programs.

D. Graduation Requirements
Relatively early in the semester in which they intend to graduate, certificate candidates must file an Intent to Graduate Card with the Graduate School and a Candidacy form with the Graduate Coordinator for English.


ENGLISH (ENGL)

In addition to the courses below, the department may offer the following Special Topics courses:
ENGL 7020-49–8020-49. Special Topics in English. (3). Topics are announced in online course listings.