Graduate Catalog
Earth Sciences

M. JERRY BARTHOLOMEW, PhD
Chair
Room 111, Johnson Hall
(901) 678-2177

ANDREW M. MICKELSON, PhD
Graduate Coordinator
(901) 678-4505

E-mail: amicklsn@memphis.edu

I. The Department of Earth Sciences offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts degree with a major in Earth Sciences and concentration in Geography; the Master of Science degrees with a major in Earth Sciences and concentrations in Archaeology, Geography, Geology, Geophysics, or Interdisciplinary Studies; the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in Earth Sciences; and a Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Systems.

A. Program Admission

Admission to both the Graduate School and the department is required. To meet departmental requirements for admission, students must submit a letter of intent stating research interests and previous research experience, three letters of recommendation, and complete the GRE. Applicants are expected to have a bachelor's degree in geography; geological sciences; geophysics; some branch of the social, natural or physical sciences; computer science; engineering; or mathematics. Admission will be based upon a number of factors including academic records, GRE scores, work or research experience, and career plans as described in the letter of intent. Applicants to the PhD program should make direct contact with one or more faculty members to discuss mutual research interests.

Admission to the program is not automatic upon meeting minimum departmental admission requirements. Students are selected from the pool of qualified applicants and the number selected depends on several factors including adequate faculty supervision, the availability of financial aid if requested, and the needs of the program. NOTE: Deadline for completion of submission is January 15 for the following fall semester and November 1 for the following spring semester. Summer school admission must be completed by April 1 for entrance into the Graduate School and the departmental program. Late submissions may be considered on an individual basis, but will normally be deferred to the following semester.

Students seeking a PhD degree are placed at the time of their admission into either the masters or PhD program by the faculty, based upon careful examination of their academic background, demonstrated abilities, and stated preferences on bypassing the masters. If a student is admitted to the masters degree program, the degree must be obtained before proceeding to the PhD unless a bypass petition is submitted to the Graduate Coordinator and approved by the DES Graduate Program Committee prior to the end of the student's first year of graduate study.

 All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued.

II. MA Degree Program in Geography

Program objectives are the development of depth of geographic knowledge, and the ability to apply this knowledge to student's career development, in at least one of the following areas: (1) human, urban, economic, and regional geography; (2) weather and climate, landforms, soil, biogeography, and water resources; (3) environmental issues and/or natural hazards; or (4) geographic techniques, computer cartography, remote sensing, geographic information systems, global positioning system, and quantitative and spatial analysis.

A. Program Requirements

  1. Students may be required to make up deficiencies as determined by the student's graduate committee.
  2. Completion of ESCI 7000, ESCI 7301 (minimum of 3 and a maximum of 6 semester hours), ESCI 7504, and other courses within Earth Sciences and/or outside the department as approved by the advisor to total a minimum of 36 graduate credits.
  3. Satisfactory completion of a Professional Paper ESCI 7900 for 3 semester hours or completion and successful defense of a thesis (ESCI 7996) for at least 6 semester hours. The professional paper option, if chosen, requires preparation before graduation of one paper of professional quality.
  4. A minimum of 70% of the total required hours must be 7000 courses. No more than a total of 12 hours of workshop courses and independent study courses may be applied to a Master's degree.
  5. Successful completion of a written Comprehensive Examination. A written examination will be administered by the student's graduate committee after the end of the second semester and before the end of the third semester, as determined by the student's graduate committee. The student must have completed 18 graduate credit hours prior to taking the comprehensive examination. The examination will not exceed three hours in length and will cover basic material presented in courses taken since the student's enrollment in the DES graduate program.

III. MS Degree Program in Earth Sciences

Program objectives are: (1) ability to solve advanced Earth Science problems involving observations and measurements in the field and the laboratory; (2) attainment of advanced knowledge of Earth Science concepts and their application in one or more subdisciplines; and (3) preparation for professional employment or for entering a doctoral program in an Earth Science or a related field.

A. Program Requirements

  1. A student may be required to make up deficiencies as determined by the student's graduate committee.
  2. Completion of at least 3 semester hours of graduate seminar coursework.
  3. Completion and successful defense of a thesis (ESCI 7996): at least 6 semester hours. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
  4. Completion of ESCI 7000 and at least 1 of the following courses: ESCI 7310, ESCI 6515, ESCI 6521, ESCI 7801, ESCI 7301, or ESCI 6101.
  5. At least 22 hours of coursework at or above the 7000-level (including thesis).
  6. Successful completion of a written Comprehensive Examination. A written examination will be administered by the student's graduate committee after the end of the second semester and before the end of the third semester, as determined by the student's graduate committee. The student must have completed 18 graduate credit hours prior to taking the comprehensive examination. The examination will not exceed three hours in length and will cover basic material presented in courses taken since the student's enrollment in the DES graduate program.
  7. Concentration requirements:
    1. Archaeology concentration:
      1. Completion of 12 semester hours of archeology graduate coursework. It is recommended that these 12 hours include courses in archaeological theory, methods, and fieldwork.
      2. Completion of elective graduate coursework, in consultation with the student's graduate committee, to obtain a minimum total of 32 semester hours.
    2. Geography concentration:
      1. Completion of 12 semester hours of geography graduate coursework. It is recommended that these 12 hours include courses in: environmental and earth sciences; human-economic geography, and geographic techniques. Students not submitting acceptable undergraduate credit in quantitative methods or statistics will be required to take a quantitative methods or statistics course.
      2. Completion of elective graduate coursework, in consultation with the student's graduate committee, to obtain a minimum total of 32 semester hours.
    3. Geology concentration:
      1. Completion of 12 semester hours of geology graduate coursework
      2. Completion of elective graduate coursework, in consultation with the student's graduate committee, to obtain a minimum total of 32 semester hours.
    4. Geophysics concentration:
      1. Completion of 12 semester hours of geophysics graduate coursework.
      2. Completion of elective graduate coursework, in consultation with the student's graduate committee, to obtain a minimum total of 32 semester hours.
    5. Interdisciplinary Studies concentration:
      1. Completion of 12 semester hours of archaeology, geography, geology or geophysics coursework.
      2. Completion of elective graduate coursework, in consultation with the student's graduate committee, to obtain a minimum total of 32 semester hours

IV. PhD Degree Program in Earth Sciences

Program objectives are: (1) understanding in at least one of the major disciplines of earth science and principles and concepts of that discipline with a more in-depth knowledge in the chosen research focus or foci; (2) expertise in experimental design, data analysis, and oral and written presentation of research results; and (3) competitive for professional positions in the field earth sciences.

A. Nature of the Program

The doctorate prepares the student for a research career, primarily by establishing a broad knowledge of one of the basic areas of geography, geology, or geophysics, and through the experience of successfully completing a dissertation of original research. The prescribed examinations will permit the student to demonstrate mastery of his or her chosen fields of expertise. The individual curriculum will reflect the student's preparation and the demands of the dissertation topic selected, and will assure a strong general knowledge of Earth Sciences.

B. Program Requirements
  1. Completion of a minimum of 72 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree or a minimum of 40 semester hours beyond the masters degree. The courses to be completed shall be determined in consultation with the student's graduate committee.
  2. Satisfactory performance on the Qualifying Examination. The Qualifying Examination will be given at the beginning of the third semester of residence, on or before a date set by the discipline Graduate Coordinator. At least one week prior to the examination date, a PhD student will present to his/her committee an abstract describing a topic that involves original research. The abstract should be no longer than one page and must describe an original concept or approach to a research problem with a suspected positive outcome deduced by the student. The subject may or may not become part of the dissertation. The exam will begin by the student giving a 15 to 20 minute presentation of the material in the abstract. An oral exam, not to exceed two hours, will follow covering (primarily) the topic described in the abstract but the questions can and should broaden to other areas.
  3. Satisfactory completion of a Comprehensive Examination. The Comprehensive Examination will be given at the beginning of the fifth semester of residence, on a date set by the Graduate Coordinator. The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to determine the student's understanding of the chosen field of specialization ("depth") as well as general knowledge in earth sciences ("breadth"). The comprehensive examination will consist of a two-day (12 hours maximum) written examination followed no more than two days later by a two-hour oral examination. The oral examination will be used to clarify any points left in question by the written responses. A student should consult his or her dissertation advisor and graduate committee regarding the areas in which comprehension is expected.
  4. Submission of two manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed journals or books.
  5. Completion and successful defense of a dissertation: (ESCI 9000) at least 9 hours. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.

V. Graduate Certificate Program in Geographic Information Systems

The Graduate Certificate Program in Geographic Information Systems is an interdisciplinary program open to students from departments in all colleges at the University of Memphis. The program draws on the expertise of faculty from different departments and colleges and includes elective courses from a wide variety of departments. The academic program for each student will be individually crafted by the student in consultation with members of the GIS Certificate Program Committee. The program is intended for students currently admitted to a graduate program at the U of M or another university or students holding a graduate degree with an interest in using GIS as a spatial problem-solving tool.

A. Admission to the Program

  1. Students currently admitted to a graduate program at the U of M or other university or students already holding a graduate degree may apply for admission to the Graduate Certificate Program in Geographic Information Systems.
  2. For students enrolled in a graduate program, a minimum GPA of 3.0 is required for admission.
  3. In rare instances, students who have completed an undergraduate degree program but who have neither completed a graduate degree nor been admitted to a graduate program must apply to the Graduate School for admission as Non-Degree Seeking students; they will be considered for admission on an individual basis.
  4. Students must apply to both the certificate program and the graduate school. To apply, students submit:
    1. transcript of undergraduate degree program and transcripts of prior and current graduate study;
    2. two letters of recommendation;
    3. A letter describing reasons why the student is interested in pursuing a graduate certificate in the area of geographic information systems and how the program corresponds with prior experience and anticipated career plans.
    4. GRE scores are required and are an important factor in admission.
    5. A minimum score of 550 on the TOEFL or 210 on the computer-based TOEFL and a minimum score of 50 on the Test of Spoken English (for students whose native language is not English)

B. Program Requirements

  1. The proposed program requires completion of 12 semester credit hours.
  2. Nine of the 12 hours must be met by satisfactory completion of three core courses:
    1. ESCI 6515 Geographic Information Science,
    2. ESCI 6525 Analytical Geographic Information Science,
    3. ESCI 7998 Capstone GIS project
  3. Three credit hours of electives, selected per student's interest, with the approval of the GIS Certificate Advisory Committee
  4. In order to continue in the program, students must maintain at least a 3.0 GPA.

EARTH SCIENCES (ESCI)

In addition to the courses below, the department may offer the following Special Topics courses:
ESCI 6308-12. Special Topics in Regional Geography. (3) Geographic analysis of physical, cultural, and economic characteristics of selected regions of the world.

ESCI 6370-6379. Special Topics in Archaeology. (3). Addresses various areas of archaeology; topics are announced in the online course listing. May be repeated with change of topic.

ESCI 6610-19. Special Topics in Geography. (3).
Topics are varied and announced in online course listings.

ESCI 7010-19–8010-19. Special Topics in Geology. (3). PREREQUISITE: Permission of Instructor.

ESCI 7020-29--8020-29. Special Topics in Geophysics. (3).

ESCI 7390-99. Special Topics in Archaeology. (3-6). (ANTH 7380-89). Provides understanding of archaeological interpretation through detailed examination of current archaeological issues and topics. No more than 6 hours may be counted toward degree requirements in Earth Sciences.


ESCI 6101 - Global Geophysics (3)
(GEOP 6101). Covers the origin, evolution, and structure of planet earth from the geophysical perspective; accretion and composition of the earth, isotopic determination of ages, differentiation of oceanic and continental crust, mechanism of plate tectonics, seismic structure, gravity and magnetic fields of the earth. PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor.

ESCI 6122 - Soils & Soil Processes (3)
(GEOG 6122). Processes and dynamics of soil profile development; major models of soil development examined and applied to soil genesis in Tennessee; application of soil techniques to archaeology, planning, earth sciences, and soil conservation and erosion problems; emphasis on field and laboratory techniques with field work in soil mapping and soil taxonomy. Two lecture, two laboratory hours per week.

ESCI 6201 - Urbanization/Environmt (3)
(GEOG 6201; same as PLAN 6201). A study of the ways humans have changed the natural environment by urbanization and how physical features and processes influence the development and function of cities.

ESCI 6202 - Geomorphology (4)
(GEOL 6202). Description, origin, and interpretation of landforms and their relationships to underlying structure and geologic history; processes acting on earths surface including active tectonics, weathering, mass-wasting, climate change, and fluvial, shoreline, and glacial processes. Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week; $25 material fee. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 1020 or ESCI 1040.

ESCI 6203 - Environmental Geophys (4)
(GEOP 6201). Survey of shallow geophysical prospecting methods, seismic reflection and refraction techniques, and electrical, magnetic and gravity field measurements; emphasis on practical measurements and fundamental principles governing acquisition and interpretation of geophysical data for shallow subsurface investigation. Three lectures, two laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor.

ESCI 6211 - Physical Hydrology (4)
(GEOL 6211). Physical hydrogeology and development of groundwater; groundwater in hydrologic cycle; aquifer characteristics and tests. Three lectures and two laboratory hours each week; $25 material fee. PREREQUISITES: ESCI 1040 and MATH 1830 or equivalent.

ESCI 6213 - Field Method/Hydrology (3)
(Geol 6213). Introduction to and practice of field methods in solving hydrologic problems. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOL) 4211 or 6211 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 6214 - Climatology (3)
(GEOG 6211). Study of climatic elements and methods of data analysis; application of climatology in agriculture, health, economics, and architecture. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 1010 and PHYS 2110/2111.

ESCI 6215 - Physical Climatology (3)
(GEOG 6215). Components of earth's energy balance; emphasis on solar radiation, heat transfer, and evapotranspiration. PREREQUISITES: ESCI 1010, PHYS 2110/2111.

ESCI 6216 - Synoptic Meteorology (3)
Physical processes in the atmosphere applied to analysis and interpretation of synoptic (regional) scale systems using weather maps, upper-air soundings, satellite and radar imagery, and computer model output; introduction to techniques used in weather forecasting. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 1010 and PHYS 2010.

ESCI 6220 - Geol/Hazard/Earthquakes (3)
(GEOP 6220). Estimation of geological aspects and hazards associated with individual earthquakes and earthquakes on specific faults; covers earthquake rupture patterns, topographic expressions, estimating ages of prehistoric earthquakes, triggering, and associated landslide and debris flows. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor.

ESCI 6231 - Water Resources (3)
(GEOG 6231; same as PLAN 6231). Study of hydrologic processes and their application to needs of cities, industry, agriculture, and recreation.

ESCI 6241 - Biogeog/GIS Analyses/Ecology (3)
(GEOG 6241). (Same as BIOL 6241). Basic principles of interaction between geography, organism diversity and evolution; physical factors limiting species distribution, theories of island biogeography, geographical modes of speciation. Laboratories introduce principles of GIS, basic functions of ArcGIS, and other programs relevant to ecological studies. Two lecture hours, two laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: BIOL 1120 and 1121, or permission of instructor.

ESCI 6251 - Environmental Hazards (3)
(GEOG). Environmental hazard and disaster experiences to investigate the nature, impact, and social responses to environmental hazards; focus is placed on relationship beteen nature, society, and technology in how people and places perceive, experience, and cope with environmental hazards.

ESCI 6252 - Global Environ Change (3)
(GEOG 6252). Understanding change occurring on the global scale from an interdisciplinary perspective; includes characteristics of natural systems, magnitude of human alteration of environmental systems, history of natural changes in climate and landscape, and the impact of these changes on our lives. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor.

ESCI 6261 - Plan/Sustainable Cities/Region (3)
Multidisciplinary and multi-scaled approach to understanding the sustainability of natural and built environments in planning cities and regions; methods for measuring sustainability; emerging development concepts and practices; technology, efficiency, social equity and public health implications of sustainability; sustainable urban/regional form of the future.

ESCI 6270 - Ancient Human Soc/Envir Chng (3)
(Same as ANTH 6270). Examination of past people and their environments from the Ice Age to recent times; archaeological and paleoecological data. Three lecture hours per week.

ESCI 6301 - Archaeol/North America (3)
Intensive study of various prehistoric cultures from earliest times until historic contact.

ESCI 6307 - Thematic Studies/China (3)
Geographic studies of the people, history, culture, and government of China, as well as analysis of role that China plays in the global economy.

ESCI 6311 - Advanced Mineralogy/Petrology (4)
Crystal chemistry, optical mineralogy, igneous and metamorphic rocks under the microscope; genesis and occurrence of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Two lecture hours, four laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: permission of instructor.

ESCI 6325 - Archaeol Fld/Lab Techn (3)
(Same as ANTH 6325) Field excavation, specimen preparation, use of survey instruments and photography, map making, archaeological record keeping; methods and techniques in archaeological laboratory analysis; emphasis on organization and supervision of laboratory procedures. PREREQUISITE: permission of instructor.

ESCI 6332 - Intro To Geochemistry (3)
(GEOL 6332). Geological and chemical processes that govern or control the migration and distribution of the elements and atomic species in the earth in space and time. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 3311, or permission of instructor.

ESCI 6341 - Aqueous Geochemistry (3)
(GEOL 6341). Physical chemistry of aqueous solutions as it applies to geochemical processes on earths surface. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 1110.

ESCI 6350 - Archaeology of Collapse (3)
(Same as ANTH 6350). Emphasis on archaeology of regional politics and archaic states throughout the world. Overview of social and political collapse of complex societies.

ESCI 6352 - Old World Archaeology (3)
Old World cultures from first humans to early civilizations.

ESCI 6375 - Cultural Resource Management (3)
Historic development, current legislation, practices and real world skills needed in cultural resource management.

ESCI 6401 - Seismology (4)
(GEOP 6401). Lays the groundwork for understanding seismic wave propagation within the earth, explores the historical context of earthquakes and the earthquake source, and gives an overview of common seismological techniques used to understand earth structure and source parameters. Three lectures and two laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: Calculus through vector calculus, or permission of instructor.

ESCI 6431 - Urban Geography (3)
Geography of urban processes and forms. Cultural, social, economic, and political aspects of the contemporary city.

ESCI 6443 - Transportation Planning (3)
(GEOG 6443; same as PLAN 6443). Planning for various transportation modes and networks and impact on urban land-use and contemporary development problems.

ESCI 6502 - Computer Cartography (3)
(GEOG 6502; same as PLAN 6502). Instruction in use of computer mapping programs as effective techniques for visual presentation of a wide variety of data. Two lecture, two laboratory hours per week; $10 material fee.

ESCI 6511 - Remote Sensing/Environ (4)
(GEOG 6511, GEOL 6512). Survey of theory and application of using color, infrared, thermal, and radar images generated from satellites and aerial photographs for geographic, geologic, environmental, and planning purposes. Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week; $25 material fee. PREREQUISITE: one college-level MATH course, or permission of instructor.

ESCI 6512 - Structural Geology (4)
(GEOL) Structures of the crust; geometry of folds and faults, rock deformation, criteria for recognizing structures, solution of geometrical problems. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 1040, MATH 1910, or permission of instructor. Course fee: $25.

ESCI 6515 - Geographic Info Science (3)
(GEOG 6515; same as PLAN 6515). Introduction to theoretical and practical understanding of fundamental GIS concept, capabilities, and applications with emphasis on nature of geographic data and issues of data input, data models, database design,spatial analysis, and data output using ArcGIS software.Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOG) 1010 or 1020 or 1301 or 3430 or 4201, or permission of instructor.

ESCI 6521 - Quantitative Methods (3)
(GEOG 6521; same as PLAN 6521). Introduction to quantitative methods in spatial analysis. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 6525 - Adv Geographic Info Sci (3)
(GEOG 6525). Introduction to design and implementation of spatial analysis approaches within context of GIS technology; further development of a sound understanding of operational basis of modern GIS technology. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOG) 4/6515 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 6531 - Field Methods/Geography (3)
(GEOG 6531). Basic methods of geographic analysis used in classifying, analyzing, and reporting field-generated data including field mapping, sampling procedures, questionnaires, and archival and public document research. One and one-half lecture hours, three laboratory hours per week; $25 material fee.

ESCI 6680 - Applied Archaeology/Museums (3)
(Same as ANTH 6680). Representations of cultural heritage in a broad array of public venues; repatriation, cultural patrimony, cultural resource management, civic engagement, rights and responsibilities of stakeholders, public involvement in museum representations, performance and education, culture and memory.

ESCI 6700 - Earth Science Internshp (1-9)
(GEOG 6700). Provides opportunity to gain experience working with an agency in which Department of Earth Sciences concentrations can be utilized. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours. Credit allowed only after acceptance of report. PREREQUISITE: Approval of instructor and chair. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

ESCI 6701 - ESCIi Field Excursions (1-2)
(GEOL 6701). Conducted field trips during spring vacation. About 30 hours of field work will follow 2-4 hours of lectures. Open to non-majors. Among the areas that may be included are Ouachita-Arbuckle-Wichita mountains of Oklahoma; Ouachita and adjacent mineral districts; central and southern Appalachians; and Gulf Coastal Plain. Check Online course listings for specific location. NOTE: May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours. $25 materials fee. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7000 - Art Of Earth Sciences (3)
Introduction to earth science research; includes project design, abstract and proposal preparation, and presentation skills.

ESCI 7100 - Basin Analysis (3)
(GEOL 7100). Integration of depositional models using subsurface correlation, seismic stratigraphy, and biostratigraphy in analysis of basin-scale sedimentary systems and their fluids. Two lecture, two laboratory hours per week. $25 materials fee. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOL) 3712.

ESCI 7101 - Regional Planning (3)
(Same as PLAN 7101) Origins of regionalism; emergence of new regionalism; delineating and designing the region; economic, ecologic, and social principles for planning the regional city; public policy in region-building; regional planning organization and governance; the functions and problems of regional plan preparation, and plan implementation.

ESCI 7102 - Electron Beam Analysis (3)
(GEOL 7102). Introduction to scanning electron microscopy and electron beam microanalysis. One lecture, four laboratory hours per week. $25 materials fee. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 1020 or CHEM 1120 and permission of instructor.

ESCI 7112 - Regional Geophysics (3)
(GEOP 7112). Theoretical and practical aspects of geophysics applied to determining earth structure and investigating tectonic processes at a regional scale; major topics include gravity, magnetism, heat flow, geoelectric, and seismic methods, and their implications for lithospheric structure and deformational processes. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOP) 6101 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 7120 - Seminar/Geomorphology (3)
(GEOG 7120-8120). Analysis and application of major geomorphic models; threshold, episodic, time-space, systems, and magnitude; frequency principles examined in both classroom and field; dating techniques applied to geomorphic interpretations; individual and team projects required.

ESCI 7131 - Seminar in Extreme Weather (3)
Advanced study in the physical processes important in the formation of blizzards, ice storms, thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and heat waves. Reconstruction of past extreme weather events. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 6216 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 7160 - Tectonics (3)
Advanced analysis of principles and geometry of plate tectonics; development of plate tectonic theory; relationship between plate motions and regional tectonics; structural, stratigraphic, magmatic and geophysical features of various tectonic regimes. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOL) 3512 or equivalent.

ESCI 7170 - Sedimentary Petrology (4)
(GEOL 7170, 7352). Sedimentary rocks in the field, hand specimen, and through the microscope with view of explaining sedimentary rock classification, post depositional changes that occur in sediments, and the bearing these factors have on geology as a whole. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. $25 materials fee. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOL) 3311, 3712, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 7190 - Igneous/Metamrphic Petr (4)
(GEOL 7190). Description and interpretation of igneous and metamorphic rocks through study of thin sections. Two lecture, four laboratory hours per week. $25 materials fee. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOL) 4311 or ESCI 6311 or equivalent.

ESCI 7195 - Groundwater Hydraulics (3)
(GEOL 7195; same as CIVL 7195). Geological contributions to ground water flow; ground water contribution to water demand and conjunctive use; well hydraulics, design, and construction; pump selection; determine aquifer properties via field well tests. PREREQUISITES: ESCI (GEOL) 6211 and permission of instructor.

ESCI 7197 - Ground Water Qual Cntrl (3)
(GEOL 7197; same as CIVL 7197). Analyses of ground water quality and contamination problems; study of multispecies chemical reactions and radioactive and microbiological decay; techniques for monitoring and site remediation of ground water contamination. PREREQUISITE: CIVL 7170 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 7201 - Geographic Environ/Anly (3)
(GEOG 7201-8201; same as PLAN 7302). Analytical and qualitative critique of the physical environment with emphasis on environmental quality, including air and water quality standards, soil erosion, solid waste management, and nuisance control.

ESCI 7202 - Quaternary Geology (3)
(GEOL 7202). Synthesis of geomorphologic, stratigraphic, and geochronologic methods used to understand global glacial and interglacial climate fluctuations during last two million years. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7204 - Prob & Earthquake Haz Anly (3)
(Same as CIVL 7136) Fundamentals of basic probability, seismicity analysis, ground motion attenuation and site effects, seismic hazard analysis, and uncertainty analysis; students will perform a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for a region of their interest. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7205 - Data Analysis in Geophysics (3)
Overview of data analysis techniques and common tools in geophysics; includes working with the UNIX/LINUX environment; understanding shells; basic programming using Fortran, C, C++, and Perl; generating publishable graphics; emphasis on seismic data analysis using Matlab and Seismic Analysis Code. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7220 - Geochronology (3)
(GEOL 7220). Study of the methods and application of relative and isotopic dating of rocks, minerals, fossils, sediments, and groundwater. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7221 - River Conservation (3)
(GEOG 7221-8221). Field-based project studying how stream habitats vary under different hydraulic flow conditions, with lecture-based materials, interactive seminars, fieldwork, and lab work drawing on geography, conservation, geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology.

ESCI 7231 - Seminar Water Resources (3)
(GEOG 7231-8231). Issues, problems, and research on selected topics of surface and groundwater, water uses, and fluvial process.

ESCI 7250 - Hazard Risk Assessment (3)
(GEOG 7250). Assesses and quantifies hazards and risks by introducing students to data, methods, and models used in hazards research; course content can be tailored to specific interests of students or provide a broad exposure to tools and techniques. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7252 - Multihazard Mitigation (3)
(GEOG 7252). Considers range and types of adjustments communities can participate in to manage risk associated with hazards such as earthquakes, floods, radiological and chemical hazards; emphasizes a multihazard approach to mitigation. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7254 - Archaeology & Hunter Gatherers (3)
Introduction to hunter-gatherer studies in archaeology and ethnoarchaeology exploring evolutionary theory applied to hunter-gatherer behavior in prehistoric contexts.

ESCI 7256 - Archaeology & Complex Society (3)
Advanced study of complex societies from local groups to archaic states. Focus on theoretical and methodological analyses of cultural complexity in prehistory. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7301 - Seminar In Geography (3)
(GEOG 7301-8301). Regional analysis of selected areas of the world including: the U.S., Canada, Europe, former Soviet Union, Middle America, South America, Asia, Africa, and Oceania. May be repeated with a change in content for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

ESCI 7310 - Archaeol Theory/Method (3)
(ANTH 7310). History of archaeology and development of conceptual framework for archaeological data collection and interpretation; current theories and methods including use of allied specialties. PREREQUISITE: Non-majors must have ANTH 1300 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 7311 - Public Archaeology (3)
(ANTH 7311). Roles and responsibilities of the archaeologist in contract and salvage work, in museum research and administration, and in the public dissemination of archaeological information. A review of relevant state and federal legislation.

ESCI 7312 - Spatial Statistics (3)
(GEOG 7312-8312). Reviews a range of spatial analytical techniques and their implementation in state-of-the-art spatial statistics software. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOG) 4521/6521 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 7315 - Intr to Modeling in Geodynamic (3)
(GEOL 7315-8315). Introduces concepts of models and modeling; students will learn to develop and use a broad spectrum of modeling techniques, from simple mathematical models to more sophisticated finite element, finite difference models, and statistical modeling. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7320 - Archeological Spatial Analysis (4)
Intensive hands-on collection, processing, and analysis of spatial archaeological data at a variety of scales and settings. Introduction to collection techniques, computer processing methods, and statistical evaluation of spatial data. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. $25.00 course fee. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7325 - Quat Paleoeco/Env Recon (4)
Advanced study of cultural ecology in past environmental regimes; emphasis on interdisciplinary approach to archaeological data and their relationship with the quaternary environment. Two lecture, four laboratory hours per week

ESCI 7327 - Lithic Artifact Analysis (3)
Introduction to lithic artifact analysis and prehistoric stone tool technologies; raw material studies; typologies; technological studies; functional studies; hands-on experience with basics of flintknapping, debitage analysis, and use-wear analysis. PREREQUISITES: ANTH 1100, 1200, 1300, or permission of instructor.

ESCI 7333 - Adv Archaeol Field Tech (1-6)
Provides basic understanding of governmental archaeology, including phase I and II research; site survey, testing, and mapping; surface collections; and rapid site assessment.

ESCI 7345 - Geoarchlg Material Sci (4)
Review of issues, problems, and research on selected topics of geoarchaeological material science. Two lecture, four laboratory hours per week.

ESCI 7353 - Geodynamics (3)
(GEOP 7353). Physical processes necessary for understanding plate tectonics and geological phenomena such as solidification of magmas, mechanical behavior of faults, and subsidence of sedimentary basins; topics include stress and strain in earth's crust, bending of lithosphere, heat conduction in lithosphere, and mantel convection. PREREQUISITE or COREQUISITE: Ordinary differential equations (MATH 3120 or equivalent).

ESCI 7355 - Geodesy (3)
(GEOP 7355). Introduces surveying using artificial satellites with emphasis on detecting, quantifying, and modeling changes in the geoid and earth's shape associated with geodynamic processes; concentrates on techniques such as VLBI, GPS, and INSAR; relationship to traditional geodesy and surveying also developed.

ESCI 7375 - Method/Math Physics I (3)
(GEOP 7376; same as MATH 7375). Vector space, matrices, tensors, vector fields, function spaces, differential and integral operators, transform theory, partial differential equations. PREREQUISITE: MATH 3120, 4242 and 4350 or permission of the instructor.

ESCI 7376 - Method/Math Physics II (3)
(GEOP 7376; same as MATH 7376, PHYS 7376). Complex variables, asymptotic expansions, special functions, calculus of variations, additional topics on matrices and operators, topics in non-linear analysis. PREREQUISITE: MATH 7375.

ESCI 7400 - Adv Field Methods/Geol (3)
(GEOL 7400). Conducted two- to five-day field studies in Geology. Topics will vary according to location and faculty interest. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Only three (3) credits may be applied to major. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7401 - Global Seismology (3)
Provides foundation for advanced graduate research, including fundamentals of continuum mechanics, vector calculus, and solutions of the vector wave equation in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media; understanding of current theories of earthquake occurrence and wave propagation within the earth. PREREQUISITE: Differential equations.

ESCI 7402 - Intermediate Seismology (3)
(GEOP 7402). Provides foundation in seismic wave propagation based on thorough understanding of point source radiation, plane wave theory, optic ray theory, and point sources in plane-layered media. PREREQUISITE: A course in partial differential equations.

ESCI 7403 - Advanced Topics Geop (3)
(GEOP 7403). Topics may include aspects of theoretical seismology, rock rheology and convection, faulting mechanics, advanced potential field techniques, or advanced field methods. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Instructor.

ESCI 7404 - Exploration Seismology (4)
Examines the reflective seismic approach to mineral exploration, and environmental and tectonic imaging; covers seismic data processing, data visualization, and acquisition procedures, including field equipment; hands-on experience analyzing seismic reflection records. Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 6401, or ESCI 7401 and ESCI 7602, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 7405 - Struc Interp/Seism Data (3)
Practical application of reflection seismic method used in tectonic analysis of deformed belts and sedimentary basins, including case studies from around the world that emphasize integration of seismic reflection data with other surface and subsurface geological/ geophysical information, as well as use of restorable structural sections; basics of seismic processing are introduced in the framework of interpretation problems. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7430 - Adv Economic Geog (3)
(GEOG 7430-8430). Selected topics in economic geography. Subjects studied will vary. May be repeated with change in content for a total of 6 hours credit.

ESCI 7434 - Studies In Land Use (3)
(GEOG 7434-8434). Systematic analysis of suburban and rural land use characteristics, patterns, and problems; focus on US.

ESCI 7440 - Tectonic Geomorphology (3)
(GEOP 7440). Examination of landscapes in regions of active deformation and role played by tectonics, surface processes, and climate in their origin; addresses range of spatial and temporal scales, encompassing long-term evolution of mountain belts to topography associated with individual structures and specific climate and tectonic conditions. PREREQUISITE: permission of instructor.

ESCI 7471 - Cultural Geography (3)
(GEOG 7471-8471). A systematic analysis of the manner in which selected culture traits interact with other patterned phenomena to produce distinctive geographic landscapes. Individual student study on selected problems is an integral part of this course.

ESCI 7504 - Sem Geog Info Systems (3)
(GEOG 7504-8504; same as PLAN 7504). Discussion of short- and long-term GIS science research topics by University Consortium of Geographic Information Science (UCGIS), such as Internet GIS, possible effects of Internet GIS on society, public participation GIS, participatory GIS, GIS for homeland security, geo-spatial society, and geo-visualization.

ESCI 7541 - Field Studies In Geog (3-6)
(GEOG 7541-8541). Faculty-conducted field trip emphasizing study of geographical phenomena; location will vary; topics may include physical landscapes, land-use patterns, cross-cultural analysis, micro and regional economics, or other geographical processes. Credit hours are based on length of time in field. Requires research and written report. May be repeated with a change in content for maximum of 6 hours. PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and completion of special registration. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

ESCI 7602 - Signal Process Erth Sci (3)
(GEOP 7602; GEOL 7358). Fundamentals of digital processing of geophysical data, both purely mathematical and applied aspects with attention to digital seismograms and gravity and magnetic data. PREREQUISITE: MATH 1920 or equivalent.

ESCI 7603 - Inverse Methods Geophys (3)
(GEOP 7603). Methods for parameter estimation in earth sciences, including review of linear algebra and vector spaces, introduction to probability and statistics, and solution of inverse linear and nonlinear problems; students will solve an inverse problem in their field of interest. PREREQUISITE: Linear Algebra (MATH 3242 or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

ESCI 7613 - GIS and Human Health (3)
Fundamental concepts in using GIS to map and analyze geographical distributions of populations at risk, health outcomes, and risk factors; to explore associations between risk factors and health outcomes; and to address health problems. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7621 - Independent Study (1-9)
(GEOG 7621). Independent investigation of a research problem selected in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Grades of S/U or IP will be given.

ESCI 7701 - Seminar In Geophysics (3)
(GEOL 7641, GEOP 7701).

ESCI 7702 - Seminar In Seismology (1-3)
(GEOP 7702-8702).

ESCI 7703 - Seminar In Geology (3)
(GEOL 7701-8701).

ESCI 7704 - Seminar In Tectonics (3)
(GEOP 7704-8704).

ESCI 7800 - Seminar In Archaeology (3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ESCI 7801 - Geog Thought & Mthdlgy (3)
(GEOG 7801). Introduces student to major philosophies of geography and to methods of geographic research.

ESCI 7850 - Principles of Geoarchaeology (4)
Study of sediments and soils and laboratory analytical techniques applied to archaeological site formation processes; two lecture, four laboratory hours per week. There is a $25.00 course fee. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 7900 - Professional Paper (3)
(GEOG 7900). Preparation and presentation of research paper. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

ESCI 7990 - Research/Earth Science (1-9)
Graduate credit for non-thesis or non-dissertation research in Earth Science. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Grades of S/U or IP will be given.

ESCI 7996 - Thesis (1-6)
Student must research, write, and defend a thesis on a topic approved by major professor and advisory committee. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

ESCI 7998 - Capstone GIS Project (3)
Preparation of a project that exhibits mastery skills of problem-solving process and advanced application of Geographic Information Systems. PREREQUISITE OR COREQUISITE: ESCI 6515, ESCI 6525 and an elective course approved by GIS Certificate Advisory Committee or permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

ESCI 8120 - Seminar/Geomorphology (3)
(GEOG 7120-8120). Analysis and application of major geomorphic models; threshold, episodic, time-space, systems, and magnitude; frequency principles examined in both classroom and field; dating techniques applied to geomorphic interpretations; individual and team projects required.

ESCI 8201 - Geographic Environ/Anly (3)
(GEOG 7201-8201; same as PLAN 7302). Analytical and qualitative critique of the physical environment with emphasis on environmental quality, including air and water quality standards, soil erosion, solid waste management, and nuisance control.

ESCI 8221 - River Conservation (3)
(GEOG 7221-8221). Field-based project studying how stream habitats vary under different hydraulic flow conditions, with lecture-based materials, interactive seminars, fieldwork, and lab work drawing on geography, conservation, geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology.

ESCI 8231 - Seminar Water Resources (3)
(GEOG 7231-8231). Issues, problems, and research on selected topics of surface and groundwater, water uses, and fluvial process.

ESCI 8250 - Hazard Risk Assessment (3)
(GEOG 7250). Assesses and quantifies hazards and risks by introducing students to data, methods, and models used in hazards research; course content can be tailored to specific interests of students or provide a broad exposure to tools and techniques. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 8254 - Archaeology & Hunter Gatherers (3)
Introduction to hunter-gatherer studies in archaeology and ethnoarchaeology exploring evolutionary theory applied to hunter-gatherer behavior in prehistoric contexts.

ESCI 8256 - Archaeology & Complex Society (3)
Advanced study of complex societies from local groups to archaic states. Focus on theoretical and methodological analyses of cultural complexity in prehistory. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 8301 - Seminar In Geography (3)
(GEOG 7301-8301). Regional analysis of selected areas of the world including: the U.S., Canada, Europe, former Soviet Union, Middle America, South America, Asia, Africa, and Oceania. May be repeated with a change in content for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

ESCI 8312 - Spatial Statistics (3)
(GEOG 7312-8312). Reviews a range of spatial analytical techniques and their implementation in state-of-the-art spatial statistics software. PREREQUISITE: ESCI (GEOG) 4521/6521 or permission of instructor.

ESCI 8315 - Intro To Modeling (3)
(GEOL 7315-8315). Introduces concepts of models and modeling; students will learn to develop and use a broad spectrum of modeling techniques, from simple mathematical models to more sophisticated finite element, finite difference models, and statistical modeling. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 8320 - Archeological Spatial Analysis (4)
Intensive hands-on collection, processing, and analysis of spatial archaeological data at a variety of scales and settings. Introduction to collection techniques, computer processing methods, and statistical evaluation of spatial data. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. $25.00 course fee. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 8403 - Advanced Topics Geop (3)
(GEOP 7403). Topics may include aspects of theoretical seismology, rock rheology and convection, faulting mechanics, advanced potential field techniques, or advanced field methods. PREREQUISITE: Permission of Instructor.

ESCI 8404 - GIS and Human Health (4)
Examines the reflective seismic approach to mineral exporation, and environmental and tectonic imaging; covers seismic data processing, data visualization, and acquisition procedures, including field equipment; hands-on experience analyzing seismic reflection records. Three lecture, two laboratory hours per week. PREREQUISITE: ESCI 6101, ESCI 6401, and permission of instructor.

ESCI 8405 - Struc Interp/Seism Data (3)
Practical application of reflection seismic method used in tectonic analysis of deformed belts and sedimentary basins, including case studies from around the world that emphasize integration of seismic reflection data with other surface and subsurface geological/ geophysical information, as well as use of restorable structural sections; basics of seismic processing are introduced in the framework of interpretation problems. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 8430 - Adv Econonic Geog (3)
(GEOG 7430-8430). Selected topics in economic geography. Subjects studied will vary. May be repeated with change in content for a total of 6 hours credit.

ESCI 8434 - Studies In Land Use (3)
(GEOG 7434-8434). Systematic analysis of suburban and rural land use characteristics, patterns, and problems; focus on US.

ESCI 8471 - Cultural Geography (3)
(GEOG 7471-8471). A systematic analysis of the manner in which selected culture traits interact with other patterned phenomena to produce distinctive geographic landscapes. Individual student study on selected problems is an integral part of this course.

ESCI 8504 - Sem Geog Info Systems (3)
(GEOG 7504-8504; same as PLAN 7504). Discussion of short- and long-term GIS science research topics by University Consortium of Geographic Information Science (UCGIS), such as Internet GIS, possible effects of Internet GIS on society, public participation GIS, participatory GIS, GIS for homeland security, geo-spatial society, and geo-visualization.

ESCI 8541 - Field Studies In Geog (3-6)
(GEOG 7541-8541). Faculty-conducted field trip emphasizing study of geographical phenomena; location will vary; topics may include physical landscapes, land-use patterns, cross-cultural analysis, micro and regional economics, or other geographical processes. Credit hours are based on length of time in field. Requires research and written report. May be repeated with a change in content for maximum of 6 hours. PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and completion of special registration. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

ESCI 8613 - GIS and Human Health (3)
Fundamental concepts in using GIS to map and analyze geographical distributions of populations at risk, health outcomes, and risk factors; to explore associations between risk factors and health outcomes; and to address health problems. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 8702 - Seminar In Seismology (1-3)
(GEOP 7702-8702).

ESCI 8703 - Seminar In Geology (3)
(GEOL 7701-8701).

ESCI 8704 - Seminar In Tectonics (3)
(GEOP 7704-8704).

ESCI 8800 - Seminar In Archaeology (3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ESCI 8850 - Principles of Geoarchaeology (4)
Study of sediments and soils and laboratory analytical techniques applied to archaeological site formation processes; two lecture, four laboratory hours per week. There is a $25.00 course fee. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ESCI 9000 - Dissertation (1-9)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

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