Graduate Catalog
Psychology

FRANK ANDRASIK, PhD
Chair
Room 202, Psychology Building
(901) 678-2145

ROBERT COHEN, PhD
Coordinator of Graduate Studies

E-mail: admissions@mail.psyc.memphis.edu
www.memphis.edu/psychology

I. The Department of Psychology offers PhD programs in Clinical Psychology, Experimental Psychology, and School Psychology, an MA/EdS (non-thesis) program in School Psychology, and an MS (either thesis or non-thesis) program in General Psychology. Students admitted to one of the PhD programs complete the requirements for the MS (with thesis) as part of their PhD requirements. The EdS degree with a major in Education with an area of emphasis in School Psychology is also available (offered collaboratively with the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences). In addition, the MS in General Psychology program may be entered as a terminal program.

Admission to each graduate program in Psychology is handled separately. Each has its own admission criteria, and application must be made for a particular program before an applicant is considered for that program. Deadlines for submission of admission materials vary with program: MS/PhD program in Experimental Psychology and MS/PhD program in School Psychology -- February 1; MS/PhD program in Clinical Psychology -- December 5; MA and EdS program in School Psychology -- June 15; and MS degree program in General Psychology -- May 15.  Any person admitted to one of these programs who desires to transfer to another program within the department must make formal application to that program and will be evaluated competitively against the same criteria and on the same time schedule as all other applicants for that program.

The departmental objective is to educate both experimentally sophisticated professional psychologists and professionally appreciative research psychologists. The department professes a strong research emphasis, with a very diverse array of theoretical models and frames of reference. Awarding a degree does not merely attest to the accumulation of the specified number of hours in the classroom but also to the acquisition of sophisticated professional and research skills. The faculty has the responsibility to both the public and the profession of psychology to award a degree only when the student has achieved a satisfactory level of professional and research competencies as judged by the graduate faculty of the department. Further, students must exhibit high integrity and moral character consistent with the standards of ethical principles set forth by the American Psychological Association and for School Psychology students, standards set forth by the National Association of School Psychologists.

For all of the following graduate programs, admission is not automatic by meeting minimal departmental admission requirements. Students are selected from a pool of qualified applicants to each program. Each year the number of students admitted to a program depends on availability of financial aid and adequate faculty supervision. Once admitted, students in these programs can obtain further details by reading the department's Graduate Student's Handbook.

 All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued.

II. MS/PhD Degree Program

There are three broad programs within the MS/PhD degree program: Clinical Psychology (APA approved), School Psychology, and Experimental Psychology. In additional to these doctoral programs, faculty and students participate in six research areas: Clinical Health Psychology; Behavioral Neuroscience; Child and Family Studies; Cognitive Psychology; Industrial, Organizational, and Applied Psychology; and Psychotherapy Research. Students interested in other areas should contact the department for further information.

In these programs the MS is preparatory to continuation in the program. In order to be advanced to doctoral study, a student must have satisfactorily completed all requirements for the MS (including a thesis that is empirical and psychological) at The University of Memphis, or have completed an equivalent degree, with empirical thesis, from another institution. Students possessing a master’s degree without a thesis will be required to complete a thesis before being advanced to doctoral study.

Program objectives are: (1) understanding of theoretical principles and practices of psychology; (2) development of expertise in experimental design, data analysis, and oral and written presentation of research results; and (3) being competitive for professional positions in psychology.

A. Program Admission and Prerequisites

Applicants to the MS/PhD degree program are evaluated once each year only, for admission in the following Fall semester; applicants for Spring admission are not considered. All application information must have been received by January 15 for a candidate to be considered for admission to the MS/PhD program in Experimental Psychology and by February 1 for the MS/PhD program in School Psychology. For the MS/PhD program in Clinical Psychology all application information must have been received by December 5. The following items are required for admission:

  1. A completed Departmental application form and completed University application form.
  2. A grade point average of at least 2.75/4.0 in all undergraduate course work. Applicants with undergraduate records at this minimum level are not ordinarily admitted. An official transcript of all undergraduate and graduate coursework must be sent.
  3. A minimum of 18 semester hours in undergraduate psychology courses, including courses in Quantitative Methods (Psychological Statistics), and Experimental Design. Students lacking some or all of these prerequisite courses, but presenting an exceptional undergraduate record, may nevertheless be granted graduate admission. However, students may be asked to remove such deficiencies before or during their first academic year.
  4. GRE scores (Verbal, Quantitative, Written Analytical) are taken into account in the admissions process.
  5. Letters of recommendation from at least three persons familiar with the applicant’s academic background and aptitude for graduate work in psychology, specifying in detail the applicant’s capabilities for graduate study and for future performance as a psychologist.
  6. A personal statement of 500-1,000 words indicating the specific graduate program area being applied for, the applicant’s present interests and career goals, research and applied interests, and prior research and applied experience. Prior undergraduate research interests and research involvement are weighted heavily.
  7. A willingness to be interviewed in person or by phone by members of the department faculty, should that be requested.

B. Program Requirements

  1. Credit Hours: A minimum of 33 semester hours of graduate credit beyond the bachelor’s degree is required for the MS degree in Psychology, and a minimum of 80 semester hours of graduate credit beyond the bachelor’s degree is required for the PhD degree in Psychology. All work for graduate credit must be approved by, and must be completed at a level of performance satisfactory to, the graduate faculty of the department. Students also may take coursework for degree credit outside the department with program approval.
  2. Transfer Credit: Students with graduate credits earned at another institution, upon matriculation at The University of Memphis, may petition to have these credits applied toward the total number of hours required to earn their degree at The University of Memphis. The student can then apply to the department to use transfer credits as substitutes for specific courses required for the degree; decisions about such substitutions are made by the department graduate coordinator. The number of transfer credits accepted as substitutions for specific courses varies by degree program; no more than 12 hours of course credit may be transferred toward a master's or EdS degree. Substitutions are not granted for any of the clinical program's core curriculum, listed below under II.B.9.a.
  3. Enrollment: MS/ PhD degree candidates are expected to carry a minimum of 9 credits per semester and to devote full time during their enrollment to pursuit of degree-related activities.
  4. Research: All MS/PhD degree students are expected to be active in research collaboratively with members of the department faculty each semester they are enrolled.
  5. Master’s Thesis and Comprehensive Examination: Each doctoral student is expected to complete an independent research project, culminating in a master’s thesis. The thesis is intended to be a demonstration of the student's ability to plan, organize, conduct, and report a research/scholarly project. Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before beginning to write. Only 3 hours of thesis credit (PSYC 7996) can count toward the degree. Upon completion of the thesis, the student takes an oral examination that assesses not only mastery of the thesis topic but also broader awareness of the theoretical and empirical issues in contemporary psychology. This oral examination serves as the MS comprehensive examination.
  6. Second Milestone Project: After completing the requirements of the master's thesis, all PhD students will complete a second milestone, usually in the third year of graduate work.  Students in the Clinical doctoral program can satisfy this requirement with a Major Area Paper (MAP) or by any of the following: a) completing an empirical manuscript, submitted for publication, b) an applied clinical research project (consultation project or clinical case study), or c) submission of a grant with the student as Principal Investigator. All alternatives require committees (four faculty members), proposal defenses, and final defenses. Students in the Experimental doctoral program can satisfy this requirement with a Specialty Examination, Major Area Paper (MAP), or completing an empirical manuscript, submitted for publication. School doctoral students must complete a written comprehensive examination to satisfy the Second Milestone requirement.
  7. Comprehensive Educational Requirements: In order that all MS/PhD students obtain comprehensive training in the diverse areas of psychology:
    1. All MS/PhD students are required to complete PSYC 7000/8000 (Clinical and School students), 7110/8110 (Experimental and School students), 7301/8301, 7302/8302, and 7621/8621 (two semesters) during the first two years. With permission of the Major Professor and Graduate Coordinator, students may substitute PSYC 7303/8303 for PSYC 7302/8302 as their required course.
    2. All MS/PhD students must complete at least one course in each of the following areas (or a substituted course approved by the student's major professor and the coordinator of graduate studies):
      1. Biological Bases of Behavior: PSYC 7441/8441, 7701/8701, or 7705/8705.
      2. Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior: PSYC 7208/8208, 7211/8211, 7222/8222, or 7407/8407.
      3. Social Bases of Behavior: 7215/8215, 7217/8217, 7219/8219, or 7220/8220.
      4. Individual Behavior: PSYC 7207/8207, 7219/8219, 7412/8412, 7416/8416, 7420/8420, or 7516/8516.
      5. Psychometric Theory: PSYC 7304/8304, or for School Psychology Students, PSYC 7304/8304, EDPR 7511/8511, or EDPR 7512/8512.
    3. All MS/PhD students must complete two additional statistics/quantitative/methodology course from the following list (or a substituted course approved by the student's major professor and the director of graduate studies): PSYC 7303/8303, 7304/8304, 7305/8305, 7306/8306, 7307/8307, 7308/8308, 7310/8310, 7311/8311, 7312/8312.
  8. Dissertation and Final Examination: The dissertation is viewed as the capstone of the student's academic training, reflecting the student's capacity for independent research. Dissertation credit hours (PSYC 9000) must be taken for a minimum of 6 hours and can be taken for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before beginning to write. Upon completion of an independent written dissertation research project acceptable to the faculty, each student will take a final oral examination oriented toward, but not exclusively on, the student's dissertation research and major area of specialization.
  9. Clinical Psychology: Students in the clinical psychology program must meet these additional requirements:
    1. Additional Required Courses and Activities for Clinical Students—PSYC 7304/8304, 7407/8407, 7412/8412, 7428/8428, 7430/8430, 7432/8432, 7435/8435, 7705/8705, and 6 credit hours of PSYC 7434/8434 (two courses of 3 hours credit each,one course must focus on therapy with diverse populations). As part of their clinical training, students must also participate in the activities of the Psychological Services Center. To fulfill this requirement, students enroll in 7438/8438 for a minimum of 6 semesters.
    2. During their time in the graduate program, clinical students receiving department funding may be placed on a department assistantship, grant-funded assistantship, or clinical agency placement. The student is required to complete a minimum of 12 months of 20 hours per week (or the equivalent) in a clinical placement before graduation.
    3. Students are also required to complete a minimum of 12 months of 20 hours per week in a research assistantship after their first year in the doctoral program. The research assistantship may be served in a community research facility or in the psychology department.
    4. Research Area Course Requirements for Clinical Students: In addition to the general clinical requirements, clinical program students in the following Research Areas must complete the courses listed below
      1. Clinical students in the Clinical Health Research area must complete two of the following courses: 7440/8440, 7441/8441, or sections of PSYC 7434/8434 focused on cognitive-behavior therapy, clinical health psychology (e.g., therapy with medical patients, changing health risk behaviors, pediatric psychology). Further, a major portion of clinical practica, the master's thesis, the doctoral dissertation, and the internship must pertain to clinical health.
      2. Clinical students in the Child and Family Studies Research area must complete PSYC 7416/8416, a section of 7434/8434 focused on children, adolescents, or families, and one other course focused on children or families (e.g., PSYC 7207/8207, 7219/8219, 7701/8701, 7705/8705. They must also attend the Child and Family Colloquium. A major portion of practicum work must involve children, and the master’s thesis and doctoral dissertation must pertain to children or families.
      3. Clinical students in the Psychotherapy Research area must also complete PSYC 7516/8516. In addition, students must complete a third section of PSYC 7438/8438 and the student’s specialty exam and dissertation must relate to psychotherapy, as approved by the student’s major professor.
    5. Clinical Internship: For students in clinical psychology, a full-time one-year internship, in an agency approved by the director of training in clinical psychology, is required. Permission from the clinical faculty must be secured before making application for internship. To be approved, the clinical faculty must judge the student to be academically and clinically ready for the internship. In addition, the student must have successfully defended the specialty exam or MAP by July 31 and the dissertation proposal by September 30 of the year in which they are applying for internship.
  10. School Psychology: Students in the School Psychology doctoral program must complete the following:
    1. PSYC 7416/8416, 7800/8800, 7802/8802, 7803/8803, 7804/8804, 7805/8805, 7806/8806, and RDNG 7542/8542, COUN 7750/8750, LEAD 6000, EDPR 7151/8151, and SPED 7000/8000.
    2. Electives (12 hours); students may choose to take all electives in a subspecialty area to be determined with the major professor.
    3. Practicum PSYC 7614/8614 (6 hours), PSYC 8809 (6 hours) and Internship PSYC 8999.
    4. School psychology students must successfully defend the dissertation proposal by the end of the spring semester of the year in which they intend to go on internship.

III. MA and EdS Degree Program in School Psychology

This program is offered collaboratively with the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences, and coursework from both areas is required. Students entering the program must complete both the MA and the EdS degrees, including an internship of one school year, in order to obtain an endorsement for licensure. The EdS degree is an advanced sequence in the specialty and is to be pursued only by persons who have completed the MA degree or comparable degree with a concentration in school psychology, or who already hold school psychology credentials. The program is part of the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences, accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), and holds full approval from the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)/CAEP; it is also formally approved by the Tennessee State Department of Education and leads to that agency’s license in school psychology.

Program objectives are: (1) understanding of the nature of educational settings and ability to work cooperatively and effectively with parents, school personnel, and other professionals; (2) broad expertise in assessment at the individual, group, and system level; and (3) development of independent research skills, including data analysis and oral and written communication of research.

A. Program Admission and Prerequisites

All application information must have been received by June 15 for a candidate to be considered for admission to the MA and EdS program in School Psychology.

  1. An undergraduate overall grade point average of 3.00/4.00. Applicants with an undergraduate GPA below this minimal level are admitted only if other supporting data are exceptional.
  2. GRE scores (Verbal, Quantitative, Written Analytical) are taken into account in the admissions process.
  3. Letters of recommendation from at least three persons (professional educators, psychologists, and/or employers) familiar with the applicant’s academic background, aptitude for graduate work in school psychology, and interest in working with school-age children in school settings.
  4. Undergraduate preparation in Psychology and/or Education. It is strongly recommended that applicants have at least 18 undergraduate hours in Psychology and/or Education, with preparation in the psychology of learning, psychological appraisal/measurement, human growth and development, and foundations of education.
  5. Those admitted must take a minimum of 9 hours each semester, unless permitted by the program director to take fewer hours.

B. Program Requirements—MA Degree (37 credits)

  1. Psychology courses (22 hours): PSYC 7800, 7207, 7802, 7803, 7804, 7805, 7806.
  2. Education courses (15 hours): EDPR 7151, EDPR 7511, and 7541; LEAD 6000; and SPED 7000 (or SPED elective if characteristics of exceptional children course was taken at the undergraduate level).
  3. Written and oral examinations.
  4. Participation in service experiences in the Psychological Services Center or other agency placements for training purposes.

C. Program Requirements—EdS Degree (30 credits)

  1. Psychology courses (9 hours): PSYC 7614 (6 hours), 7301 or research elective.
  2. Education courses (9 hours): EDPR 7112, RDNG 7542, COUN 7542.
  3. School Psychology Internship (PSYC 8812, 12 hours) is taken at or near the completion of other work.
  4. Written examination.

IV. MS Degree Program in General Psychology

A. Program Admission and Prerequisites

All application information must have been received by May 15 for a candidate to be considered for admission to the MS degree program in General Psychology.

  1. An undergraduate grade point average of 2.5/4.0 is required for admission without special permission.
  2. GRE scores (Verbal, Quantitative, Written Analytical) are taken into account in the admissions process.
  3. Letters of recommendation from at least three persons familiar with the applicant’s academic background and aptitude for graduate work in Psychology.
  4. It is strongly recommended that applicants have 12 undergraduate hours in psychology, including a course in statistics.
  5. Applications to the MS in General Psychology program are considered once a year, to make decisions about enrollment for the following fall semester.

B. Program Requirements

Admission to the MS in General Psychology program does not require a student to take any minimum number of credits per semester. The only constraint upon the pace at which the student pursues the degree is that credits more than six years old may not be counted toward the degree.

  1. All students in the MS in General Psychology program must be in good academic standing at the end of 15 credit hours of graduate work in order to continue in the program.
    1. PSYC 7301 or equivalent
    2. PSYC 7302 or equivalent
    3. At least two of the following: PSYC 7000, 7207, 7217, 7219, 7222, 7412, 7416, 7435,7440, 7701, 7800
  2. During the first year in the program, it is expected that the student will, in consultation with the coordinator or major professor, have decided on goals and objectives for the remainder of the course of study. Courses that fit these goals and objectives may be in Psychology or other departments in the university. Students who are not in good academic standing at this time must institute an appeal with supporting letters to the Coordinator and MS in General Psychology Committee for consideration of continuance in the program. Such cases will be considered on an individual basis.
  3. A total approved program of 33 credit hours if the student elects to do a thesis, or 36 credit hours without a thesis. Students electing to write a thesis should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before beginning to write.
  4. For students not conducting a thesis, a specialty review and defense covering the student’s area(s) of focus will be completed during the last semester in the program.

PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

In addition to the courses below, the department may offer the following Special Topics courses:
7010-29–8010-29. Special Topics in Psychology. (1-3). Topics are varied and announced in online class listings.


PSYC 7000 - History/System Psyc (3)
Seminar of basic issues in contemporary psychology within their historical context with extensive examination of their implications for theoretical and professional applications. Required of all Clinical and School Psychology doctoral degree candidates.

PSYC 7110 - Ethics And Psychology (3)
In-depth review of the ethical standards that impact work of psychologists in health services, consultation, teaching, and research settings; emphasizes ethical issues and dilemmas, mastery of ethical decision-making, understanding community standards for practice, and the interface between ethical guidelines and the law. Restricted by program or permit required. Required of all Experimental and School Psychology doctoral candidates.

PSYC 7203 - Behavior Analysis (3)
A comprehensive treatment of behavioral principles in their application to simple and complex forms of behavior. The course focuses on operant conditioning of animal behavior and demonstrates the basic behavioral principles at work in their simplest form. These operant conditioning principles are extended to human behavior occurring in the natural environment. Increasingly complex human behaviors are successively introduced.

PSYC 7207 - Developmental Psyc (3)
Focuses on theories, issues, and research related to cognitive development and learning from infancy to adulthood for the "normal" individual. Theories covered include Piaget, Vygotsky, and Information Processing. Research reviewed includes representations of knowledge, human performance and expertise, and emotion regulation. Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7208 - Psyc Of Perception (3)
An examination of the historical development, research, and major theoretical positions in the area of perceptual psychology. Major emphasis is placed on theoretical and experimental treatment of the basic perceptual phenomena.

PSYC 7211 - Cognitive Processes (3)
Overview of cognitive psychology and cognitive science, with emphasis on theoretical explanations and critical evaluation of empirical evidence; topics include perception and attention, short- and long-term memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, decision making, and artificial intelligence. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7212 - Industrial Psychology (3)
Examination of the content and methodology used by industrial psychologists in personnel selection, classification, training, and performance evaluation. Students are familiarized with the skills necessary for these activities, as well as the guidelines and legal constraints on organizations' hiring, promotion, and performance evaluation practices.

PSYC 7213 - Personnel Psychology (3)
An in-depth study of the theories and procedures used by personnel psychologists to conduct job analyses and apply the findings to the development of valid and reliable selection/promotion strategies and performance measurement instruments. The course includes a significant amount of hands-on experience so students acquire the knowledge and skills to competently carry out these activities in applied settings. PREREQUISITE: 7212/8212.

PSYC 7214 - Industrial Training (3)
Examination of the content and methodology used by industrial psychologists to develop, implement, and evaluate training programs in work settings. Students acquire the skills to conduct training needs assessments, select from various training platforms, develop training programs, and assess the degree to which they accomplish their organizational objectives. The course includes exposure to new computer-based and web-based training technologies.

PSYC 7215 - Organizational Psyc (3)
The course deals with the major organizational determinants of individual and group behavior and performance. The characteristics of organization structure and climate are explored from both a classical and a contemporary viewpoint. Organization change and development theories are examined plus the major ancillary theoretical positions on leadership, individual and group performance, behavior modification, selection and training. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7217 - Social Psychology (3)
Review of theoretical and empirical literature examining behavior and experience of individuals in social settings; includes coverage of attributions and interpersonal perception, attitude formation and change, prejudice and stereotyping, interpersonal attraction, social influence, human aggression, and prosocial behavior.

PSYC 7218 - Incr Orgnl Productivity (3)
Examination of the theories and methodologies used to diagnose organization problems, determine their causes, and select, implement, and evaluate interventions to mitigate the problems and increase organizational productivity. Students acquire a knowledge base and specific skills employed by organizational psychologists to help effect organizational improvements. The course involves lecture, discussion, and group projects. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7215/8215.

PSYC 7219 - Soc/Persnlty Devel (3)
A general survey of social and personality development from infancy through adolescence. The course consists of three sections: (1) general theoretical perspectives, including intrapsychic, cognitive, and social learning approaches; (2) intra-individual phenomena such as sex role, traits, moral development, etc.; (3) inter-individual phenomena such as family interactions, peer interactions, and societal influences.

PSYC 7220 - Social Cognition (3)
Review of major contemporary issues in social psychology from a social cognitive perspective; cognitive-information processing approach as it applies to social psychology; attributions, schemas, attention and perception, impression-formation and social memory, accessibility and priming, the self, and decision making.

PSYC 7221 - Natural Lang Processng (3)
(Same as COMP 7780-8780). Computational aspects, algorithms, and techniques for human language processing including lexical analysis, syntactic parsing, semantics, word sense disambiguation, logic forms, dialogue, and pragmatics; applications include question answering and information extraction among others. PREREQUISITE: COMP 6040 or 6041 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 7222 - Psychology Human Memory (3)
Major theoretical and empirical issues in the study of human memory; major emphasis on nature of structures and processes involved in memory encoding and retrieval and nature of representations available to memory. Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7223 - Intelligent Tutoring (3)
Covers selected internet-based training systems and their links to cognition, education, and computing; focuses on learning environments, including basic theories in learning science, advanced learning technologies, software development, and applications in academic settings.

PSYC 7301 - Research Design & Meth (3)
Emphasis on mathematical and nonmathematical analyses of psychological data, theoretical and experimental implications of different analyses, various data collection techniques, and types of experimental and statistical control; ethical issues and ethical principles of research conduct. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7302 - Adv Statistics Psych I (3)
Introduction to general linear model; multiple regression analysis, and single- and multiple-factor analysis of variance; emphasis on using software programs to perform statistical analyses. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 3001 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 7303 - Adv Statistics Psych II (3)
Intermediate and advanced topics related to analysis of variance, including fixed and random effects, repeated measures, non-orthogonal designs, and the analysis of covariance; traditional analysis of variance concerns within framework of general linear model; scales of measurement, planned and post hoc comparisons, power analysis and concept of effect size. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7302 or equivalent.

PSYC 7304 - Meas Th & Psychomet (3)
Measurement theory involved in the construction and evaluation of psychological measuring instruments will be stressed. Particular emphasis will be placed on scaling methods and their use in psychological research and evaluation. Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7305 - Quant Meth Review Rsch (3)
(same as PUBH 7305-8305). Quantitative procedures (meta-analysis) for reviewing research findings in psychology and other social sciences; techniques for locating and coding research studies, calculating effect sizes, and analyzing study findings. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7306 - Linear Struct Modeling (3)
Path models, path analysis, cross-lagged panel studies, confirmatory factor analysis, and complete latent variable causal models, including applications of the latter to experimental and non-experimental data.

PSYC 7307 - Models Program Eval (3)
History and nature of program evaluation, review of different approaches taken to evaluation by variety of major theorists in the field; practice in evaluation.

PSYC 7308 - Appl Multivariate Stat (3)
Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) with independent designs and its extension to repeated measures ANOVA. Goals include review conceptual bases, learn SPSS procedures, analyze simple and complex designs, and learn special post hoc procedures. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7302 or equivalent.

PSYC 7309 - Focus Group Research (3)
Examination of the general logic of focus group research, including strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Methodology will be covered in depth, including how to plan a project, development of questions for a focus group, moderating the group, and analyzing and reporting data. Completion of a semester project is required.

PSYC 7310 - Mixed-Model Regress Anly (3)
Instruction in the use of mixed-model regression with a focus on design and analysis of group-randomized trials; attention also given to analysis of data from surveys based on cluster sampling, longitudinal studies, and studies involving matching. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7301, 7302, and 7303 and permission of instructor.

PSYC 7311 - Appl Cat Data Analysis (3)
Instruction includes tabular, logistic, and Poisson and Cox regression, as well as interpretation of SAS output. For advanced students in psychology, education, and public health pursuing a career in research. PREREQUISITES: PSYC 7301, 7302, 7303, and permission of instructor.

PSYC 7312 - Qualitative Resrch/Psyc (3)
Examines history and current practice of research stemming from a human science philosophy, introducing a variety of qualitative research methodologies; examines differences and similarities in human and natural sciences in order to appreciate the significance of epistemology on research practice. PREREQUISITE/COREQUISITE: PSYC 7301 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 7313 - Computational Models Cog Sci (3)
A survey of popular techniques used to model mental processes and experimental data. Both computational and mathematical models will be considered. Examples include: artificial neural networks for psycholinguistics, Bayesian methods for learning and categorization, general processing tree models for reaction time studies, diffusion and random walk processes of memory, and knowledge representation. The seminar will focus on conceptual issues while providing a brief mathematical introduction to the models for a general behavioral science audience.

PSYC 7315 - Randomized Clinical Trials (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a thorough grounding in planning and executing randomized clinical trials (RCTs) including design, management, evaluation, and resource acquisition. PREREQUISITES: PSYC 7301 and 7302. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7407 - Cognition & Emotion (3)
Cognition and emotion affect behavior in a myriad of ways. The interactions of cognition and emotion are also quite complex. The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of research on the cognitive and affective bases of behavior. The course is also designed to foster critical thinking and presentation skills.

PSYC 7411 - Psyc Process Research (3)
Investigates current practice of examining effects of interventions within sessions, of therapy events, and of differences in psychotherapy orientations. Through examining mock therapy transcripts and interviews, students build skills toward independent implementation of psychotherapy or interview-related research. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7301 and 7434, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 7412 - Psychopathology (3)
Survey of the manifestations of abnormal behavior and psychological processes; detailed analysis of clinical and experimental literature concerning psychological and psychiatric disorders and their etiology. Historical principles are emphasized. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7416 - Child Psychopathology (3)
A survey of the major theoretical formulations of childhood disorders, including learning, developmental, psychoanalytic, and family systems theories. Organic, familial, and sociocultural influences are discussed. Emphasis is placed on basic research that contributes to our understanding of these difficulties. Traditional approaches to intervention are reviewed along with family treatment. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7419 - Family Therapy (3)
Overview of family therapy as treatment modality and point of view, emphasizing interdependence of theory, practice, and research; focuses on brief problem-focused therapy, behavioral couples and family therapy, multigenerational family systems therapy, strategic and structural approaches, systemic family therapy, experiential approaches, and narrative family therapy. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7420 - Personal Construct Thry (3)
In-depth seminar on personal construct theory, a cognitively oriented theory of personality stemming from the work of George Kelly. Philosophical assumptions and basic theory; use of repertory grid technique and its application to research on such topics as cognitive complexity, development, interpersonal relationships, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7428 - Foundatns Clinical Psyc (3)
Introduction to fundamental concepts and methods of clinical psychology conceived as application of scientific reasoning to human problems; historical and scientific foundations for scientist-practitioner model, and various roles of clinical psychologist in social context; ethical, legal, and multi-cultural issues emphasized. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate training program in clinical psychology.

PSYC 7430 - Clin Assessment/Ability (4)
Introduction to psychological assessment of cognitive abilities and achievement; exposure to basic psychometric concepts; observation and interpretation of assessment related to behavior; specific emphasis on development of assessment skills such as test administration, test interpretation, and report writing; ethical and legal issues of professional conduct emphasized. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7432 - Clinic Asses/Case Cncpt (4)
Comprehensive review of fundamental concepts and practices of clinical assessment as application of scientific reasoning to problem of case conceptualization; development of conceptualization skills to integrate interview, objective assessment, and systematic observations; evaluation of different assessment approaches for empirical support and utility in case management; critical and analytic thinking, ethical and legal issues of professional conduct emphasized. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7434 - Clin Psychotherapies (3)
In-depth study of methods of psychotherapy and intervention strategies, their basic assumptions, spheres of applicability, and typical outcomes. Therapeutic approach covered will depend upon the particular instructor. May be repeated for maximum of 20 credits with change in topic. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7435 - Intro To Psychotherapy (3)
Required for all clinical students. Surveys major traditions of psychotherapy - psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, and systemic - considering originators' works as well as contemporary exponents; includes didactic (reading, discussion) and experiential learning (exercises, role plays) to promote both conceptual and practical acquaintance with the implications of each tradition. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7438 - Pract Clinical Trtmt (1-3)
Practical experience to students in clinical psychology, permitting them to work under professional supervision for 42 client contact hours in the Psychological Services Center. Students conduct intake interviews, administer and interpret psychological tests, and provide therapy. May be repeated for maximum of 24 hours credit. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate training program in clinical psychology. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7439 - Clin Assessmnt/Report Wrtng (3)
Develops strong assessment skills and ability to write comprehensive mental health reports; students perform assessments and receive instruction in the Psychological Services Center; instructor provides feedback on student's testing, analysis of tests, integration of tests into comprehensive understanding of client, and writing professional reports. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7/8412, 7/8428, 7/8432, and 7/8621. Grades of S/U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7440 - Behavioral Medicine I (3)
Overview of behavioral medicine and examination of psychologists' roles in healthcare settings; psychological and interpersonal factors that affect healthcare delivery will be examined, such as physician-patient communication, gender, and ethnic diversity; differences in ethical underpinnings between medicine and psychology will be explored. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7441 - Psyc/Medical Illness (3)
Addresses application of psychological principles to promote coping with medical disability and optimal healing; diagnostic interviewing and medical consulting skills emphasized; psychological and cognitive impact on various medical diseases and disorders reviewed; biological bases of behavior emphasized. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7501 - Sem General Psychology (3)
Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7503 - Sem Experiment Psyc (3)
Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7506 - Sem Clinical Psyc (3)


PSYC 7507 - Sem Industrial Psyc (3)


PSYC 7509 - Sem School Psychology (3)


PSYC 7510 - Sem Organztnl Psych (3)


PSYC 7512 - Sem Develpmtal Psyc (3)


PSYC 7514 - Sem Cognitive Science (3)


PSYC 7515 - Sem Social Psychology (3)


PSYC 7516 - Issues Psychothrpy Rsch (3)
Research evidence pertaining to basic questions about psychotherapy and its effectiveness; classic contributions and current research findings. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7517 - Grant Prop Writing/Psyc (3)
Introduction to grant-writing process with emphasis on NIH funding; topics include identifying funding sources, grant writing and resubmissions, and grant reviewing; students prepare a suitable grant application as part of the course.

PSYC 7520 - Tchng Skills Grad Asst (3)
Overview of teaching responsibilities and skills and discussion of teaching issues for graduate teaching assistants; supervised practical experience teaching college courses and feedback on performance. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of graduate coordinator. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7601 - Res Prac Gen Psych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7602 - Res Prac Phys Psych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7603 - Res Prac Exp Psych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7604 - Res Prac Comp Psych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7605 - Res Prac Social Psyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7606 - Res Prac Clinical Psyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7607 - Res Prac Devlpmntl Psyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7608 - Res Prac Neuropsyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7609 - Res Prac School Psych (1-3)
Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7610 - Field Prac Clin Psyc (1-6)
Supervised experience in the use of psychological diagnostic, treatment, or community intervention procedures in various community agencies and facilities. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate training program in Clinical Psychology, or consent of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7611 - Field Prac Soc-Indust (1-3)
Seminar discussion and supervised experience in the application of basic psychological procedures and principles to social, personnel, and organizational activities in various industrial, military and community settings. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7614 - Prac School Psyc (3)
Supervised experience in the application of psychological procedures in educational and clinical settings. A minimum of two practica are required. First practicum requires grades of 3.0 or better in PSYC 7803 and 7804; second requires 3.0 or better in PSYC 7805 and 7806, and S in first practicum. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate training program in school psychology and permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7615 - Special Problems (1-3)
Independent investigation of a research problem, or directed readings, in a selected area of psychology chosen in consultation with the instructor. Only six hours credit may be applied to the degree. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7616 - Clin Prac Neuropsyc (3)
The advanced student interested in neuropsychology will receive supervised experience in the use of psychodiagnostic techniques in various community settings; training covers basic diagnostic techniques, specialized diagnostic techniques, and neurological assessment procedures. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7618 - Res Prac Cogn Psych/Sci (1-3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Department Permit Required.

PSYC 7619 - Child/Family Practicum (1-3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7621 - Research Practicum (3)
This practicum is required of all first year doctoral students and others receiving department financial assistance and may be taken by General Psychology Masters students. This course serves to introduce the student to research currently being conducted by faculty in the Department of Psychology. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7622 - Res Prac: Behav Med (1-3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 7701 - Behavioral Neuroscience (3)
A comprehensive study of the relationships between brain function and behavior; topics include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, sensory systems, learning and memory, motor systems and disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7705 - Neuropsychopharmacology (3)
Overview of basic principles of neuropharmacology and contemporary issues in clinical psychopharmacology; introduces principles of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, drug-receptor pharmacology, neuroanalytical methodology, and chemical neuroanatomy of the brain; culminates with overviews of contemporary drug treatment strategies for a range of cognitive, pathological, and neurological disorders, including substance abuse. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7800 - Intro School Psychology (3)
Survey of school psychology including historical foundations, roles and functions, school and community practices, standards and ethics, issues, technological developments; trends in credentialing and practice at the state and national level.

PSYC 7802 - Child Disability/Family (3)
An overview of childhood disability and family considerations applied to psychological services in school and agency settings; agency and family visitations provide experiential learning in addition to theory and research. PREREQUISITES: Course on characteristics of exceptional children and permission of instructor.

PSYC 7803 - Psych Ed Assessmnt I (4)
Critical analysis of intellectual assessment including skill development in administration, scoring, and interpretation of major individual tests of intelligence; related psychoeducational instruments with emphasis on case study data collection and report writing. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate studies in psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 7804 - Psych Ed Assessmnt II (3)
Critical analysis of personality assessment including skill development in administration, scoring, and interpretation of major personality assessment techniques; related psychoeducational instruments with emphasis on case study data collection and report writing. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7803 and permission of instructor. School psychology students must have a grade of 3.0 or higher in PSYC 7803. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7805 - Psych Consultation (3)
This course teaches the theory and skills needed for providing consultation to students and families in educational and clinical settings; focusing on an ecological, problem-centered model, content will include factors influencing the consultation process at the individual, group, and system level. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7806 - Sch Psych Interventions (3)
Students will acquire skills needed to provide individual, group, family, and crisis intervention services to children and adolescents in educational and clinical settings; course material will include empirically-validated interventions focusing on issues related to the academic, social, emotional, and psychological needs of the child/adolescent. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7805-8805, COUN 7542 or equivalent. School Psychology students must have a grade of 3.0 or higher in PSYCH 7805.

PSYC 7807 - Adv Sch Psych Intrvntn (3)
Students will refine skills in both direct and indirect school psychological services using empirically-validated interventions; course material will cover current intervention issues in school psychology, the role of supervision in school psychology, evaluating the efficacy of interventions, and the link between assessment and treatment planning. PREREQUISITES: PSYC 7803-8803, 7804-8804, 7805-8805, and 7806-8806.

PSYC 7808 - Psychoed Assessmnt III (3)
Introduction to psychoeducational assessment of preschool children; includes issues surrounding early assessment, skill development with preschool instruments, and related report writing, conferencing. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 7809 - Adv Sch Psych Practicum (3)
Applied experience utilizing both direct and indirect school psychological services and supervision; students will assume the role of case manager providing comprehensive services for multiple clients; students will also be expected to supervise students in the beginning intervention practicum. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7812 - Intern: School Psyc (3-6)
Supervised field placement in school and/or community agency settings; requires a minimum of 1200 hours for the EdS and 1500 for the PhD, at least half of which must be in a school setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours applied toward either degree. PREREQUISITE: Admission to the school psychology program, permission of program coordinator, grades of S in all previous practica. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 7900 - Psychology of Gender (3)
This course will examine how gender affects all aspects of our lives at both the societal/cultural level and the individual level within the societal/cultural context.

PSYC 7996 - Thesis (1-3)
Independent research for master's degree. Application for writing a thesis must be filled out on an approved form after consultation with major professor and filed with the Graduate School. Only 3 hours may be counted toward degree requirements. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8000 - History/System Psyc (3)
Seminar of basic issues in contemporary psychology within their historical context with extensive examination of their implications for theoretical and professional applications. Required of all Clinical, Experimental and School Psychology doctoral degree candidates.

PSYC 8110 - Ethics And Psychology (3)
In-depth review of the ethical standards that impact work of psychologists in health services, consultation, teaching, and research settings; emphasizes ethical issues and dilemmas, mastery of ethical decision-making, understanding community standards for practice, and the interface between ethical guidelines and the law.

PSYC 8203 - Behavior Analysis (3)
A comprehensive treatment of behavioral principles in their application to simple and complex forms of behavior. The course focuses on operant conditioning of animal behavior and demonstrates the basic behavioral principles at work in their simplest form. These operant conditioning principles are extended to human behavior occurring in the natural environment. Increasingly complex human behaviors are successively introduced.

PSYC 8207 - Developmental Psyc (3)
Focuses on theories, issues, and research related to cognitive development and learning from infancy to adulthood for the "normal" individual. Theories covered include Piaget, Vygotsky, and Information Processing. Research reviewed includes representations of knowledge, human performance and expertise, and emotion regulation. Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8208 - Psyc Of Perception (3)
An examination of the historical development, research, and major theoretical positions in the area of perceptual psychology. Major emphasis is placed on theoretical and experimental treatment of the basic perceptual phenomena.

PSYC 8211 - Cognitive Processes (3)
Overview of cognitive psychology and cognitive science, with emphasis on theoretical explanations and critical evaluation of empirical evidence; topics include perception and attention, short- and long-term memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, decision making, and artificial intelligence. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8212 - Industrial Psychology (3)
Examination of the content and methodology used by industrial psychologists in personnel selection, classification, training, and performance evaluation. Students are familiarized with the skills necessary for these activities, as well as the guidelines and legal constraints on organizations' hiring, promotion, and performance evaluation practices.

PSYC 8213 - Personnel Psychology (3)
An in-depth study of the theories and procedures used by personnel psychologists to conduct job analyses and apply the findings to the development of valid and reliable selection/promotion strategies and performance measurement instruments. The course includes a significant amount of hands-on experience so students acquire the knowledge and skills to competently carry out these activities in applied settings. PREREQUISITE: 7212/8212.

PSYC 8214 - Industrial Training (3)
Examination of the content and methodology used by industrial psychologists to develop, implement, and evaluate training programs in work settings. Students acquire the skills to conduct training needs assessments, select from various training platforms, develop training programs, and assess the degree to which they accomplish their organizational objectives. The course includes exposure to new computer-based and web-based training technologies.

PSYC 8215 - Organizational Psyc (3)
The course deals with the major organizational determinants of individual and group behavior and performance. The characteristics of organization structure and climate are explored from both a classical and a contemporary viewpoint. Organization change and development theories are examined plus the major ancillary theoretical positions on leadership, individual and group performance, behavior modification, selection and training. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8217 - Social Psychology (3)
Review of theoretical and empirical literature examining behavior and experience of individuals in social settings; includes coverage of attributions and interpersonal perception, attitude formation and change, prejudice and stereotyping, interpersonal attraction, social influence, human aggression, and prosocial behavior.

PSYC 8218 - Incr Orgnl Productivity (3)
Examination of the theories and methodologies used to diagnose organization problems, determine their causes, and select, implement, and evaluate interventions to mitigate the problems and increase organizational productivity. Students acquire a knowledge base and specific skills employed by organizational psychologists to help effect organizational improvements. The course involves lecture, discussion, and group projects. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7215/8215.

PSYC 8219 - Soc/Persnlty Devel (3)
A general survey of social and personality development from infancy through adolescence. The course consists of three sections: (1) general theoretical perspectives, including intrapsychic, cognitive, and social learning approaches; (2) intra-individual phenomena such as sex role, traits, moral development, etc.; (3) inter-individual phenomena such as family interactions, peer interactions, and societal influences.

PSYC 8220 - Social Cognition (3)
Review of major contemporary issues in social psychology from a social cognitive perspective; cognitive-information processing approach as it applies to social psychology; attributions, schemas, attention and perception, impression-formation and social memory, accessibility and priming, the self, and decision making.

PSYC 8221 - Natural Lang Processng (3)
(Same as COMP 7780-8780). Computational aspects, algorithms, and techniques for human language processing including lexical analysis, syntactic parsing, semantics, word sense disambiguation, logic forms, dialogue, and pragmatics; applications include question answering and information extraction among others. PREREQUISITE: COMP 6040 or 6041 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 8222 - Psychology Human Memory (3)
Major theoretical and empirical issues in the study of human memory; major emphasis on nature of structures and processes involved in memory encoding and retrieval and nature of representations available to memory. Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8223 - Intelligent Tutoring (3)
Covers selected internet-based training systems and their links to cognition, education, and computing; focuses on learning environments, including basic theories in learning science, advanced learning technologies, software development, and applications in academic settings.

PSYC 8301 - Research Design & Meth (3)
Emphasis on mathematical and nonmathematical analyses of psychological data, theoretical and experimental implications of different analyses, various data collection techniques, and types of experimental and statistical control; ethical issues and ethical principles of research conduct. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8302 - Adv Statistics Psych I (3)
Introduction to general linear model; multiple regression analysis, and single- and multiple-factor analysis of variance; emphasis on using software programs to perform statistical analyses. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 3001 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 8303 - Adv Statistics Psych II (3)
Intermediate and advanced topics related to analysis of variance, including fixed and random effects, repeated measures, non-orthogonal designs, and the analysis of covariance; traditional analysis of variance concerns within framework of general linear model; scales of measurement, planned and post hoc comparisons, power analysis and concept of effect size. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7302 or equivalent.

PSYC 8304 - Meas Th & Psychomet (3)
Measurement theory involved in the construction and evaluation of psychological measuring instruments will be stressed. Particular emphasis will be placed on scaling methods and their use in psychological research and evaluation. Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8305 - Quant Meth Review Rsch (3)
(same as PUBH 7305-8305). Quantitative procedures (meta-analysis) for reviewing research findings in psychology and other social sciences; techniques for locating and coding research studies, calculating effect sizes, and analyzing study findings. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8306 - Linear Struct Modeling (3)
Path models, path analysis, cross-lagged panel studies, confirmatory factor analysis, and complete latent variable causal models, including applications of the latter to experimental and non-experimental data.

PSYC 8307 - Models Program Eval (3)
History and nature of program evaluation, review of different approaches taken to evaluation by variety of major theorists in the field; practice in evaluation.

PSYC 8308 - Appl Multivariate Stat (3)
Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) with independent designs and its extension to repeated measures ANOVA. Goals include review conceptual bases, learn SPSS procedures, analyze simple and complex designs, and learn special post hoc procedures. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7302 or equivalent.

PSYC 8309 - Focus Group Research (3)
Examination of the general logic of focus group research, including strengths and weaknesses of this approach. Methodology will be covered in depth, including how to plan a project, development of questions for a focus group, moderating the group, and analyzing and reporting data. Completion of a semester project is required.

PSYC 8310 - Mixed-Model Regress Anly (3)
Instruction in the use of mixed-model regression with a focus on design and analysis of group-randomized trials; attention also given to analysis of data from surveys based on cluster sampling, longitudinal studies, and studies involving matching. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7301, 7302, and 7303 and permission of instructor.

PSYC 8311 - Appl Cat Data Analysis (3)
Instruction includes tabular, logistic, and Poisson and Cox regression, as well as interpretation of SAS output. For advanced students in psychology, education, and public health pursuing a career in research. PREREQUISITES: PSYC 7301, 7302, 7303, and permission of instructor.

PSYC 8312 - Qualitative Resrch/Psyc (3)
Examines history and current practice of research stemming from a human science philosophy, introducing a variety of qualitative research methodologies; examines differences and similarities in human and natural sciences in order to appreciate the significance of epistemology on research practice. PREREQUISITE/COREQUISITE: PSYC 7301 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 8313 - Computational Models Cog Sci (3)
A survey of popular techniques used to model mental processes and experimental data. Both computational and mathematical models will be considered. Examples include: artificial neural networks for psycholinguistics, Bayesian methods for learning and categorization, general processing tree models for reaction time studies, diffusion and random walk processes of memory, and knowledge representation. The seminar will focus on conceptual issues while providing a brief mathematical introduction to the models for a general behavioral science audience.

PSYC 8315 - Randomized Clinical Trials (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a thorough grounding in planning and executing randomized clinical trials (RCTs) including design, management, evaluation, and resource acquisition. PREREQUISITES: PSYC 7301 and 7302. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8407 - Cognition & Emotion (3)
Cognition and emotion affect behavior in a myriad of ways. The interactions of cognition and emotion are also quite complex. The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of research on the cognitive and affective bases of behavior. The course is also designed to foster critical thinking and presentation skills.

PSYC 8411 - Psyc Process Research (3)
Investigates current practice of examining effects of interventions within sessions, of therapy events, and of differences in psychotherapy orientations. Through examining mock therapy transcripts and interviews, students build skills toward independent implementation of psychotherapy or interview-related research. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7301 and 7434, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 8412 - Psychopathology (3)
Survey of the manifestations of abnormal behavior and psychological processes; detailed analysis of clinical and experimental literature concerning psychological and psychiatric disorders and their etiology. Historical principles are emphasized. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8416 - Child Psychopathology (3)
A survey of the major theoretical formulations of childhood disorders, including learning, developmental, psychoanalytic, and family systems theories. Organic, familial, and sociocultural influences are discussed. Emphasis is placed on basic research that contributes to our understanding of these difficulties. Traditional approaches to intervention are reviewed along with family treatment. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8419 - Family Therapy (3)
Overview of family therapy as treatment modality and point of view, emphasizing interdependence of theory, practice, and research; focuses on brief problem-focused therapy, behavioral couples and family therapy, multigenerational family systems therapy, strategic and structural approaches, systemic family therapy, experiential approaches, and narrative family therapy. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8420 - Personal Construct Thry (3)
In-depth seminar on personal construct theory, a cognitively oriented theory of personality stemming from the work of George Kelly. Philosophical assumptions and basic theory; use of repertory grid technique and its application to research on such topics as cognitive complexity, development, interpersonal relationships, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8428 - Foundatns Clinical Psyc (3)
Introduction to fundamental concepts and methods of clinical psychology conceived as application of scientific reasoning to human problems; historical and scientific foundations for scientist-practitioner model, and various roles of clinical psychologist in social context; ethical, legal, and multi-cultural issues emphasized. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate training program in clinical psychology.

PSYC 8430 - Clin Assessment/Ability (4)
Introduction to psychological assessment of cognitive abilities and achievement; exposure to basic psychometric concepts; observation and interpretation of assessment related to behavior; specific emphasis on development of assessment skills such as test administration, test interpretation, and report writing; ethical and legal issues of professional conduct emphasized. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8432 - Clinic Asses/Case Cncpt (4)
Comprehensive review of fundamental concepts and practices of clinical assessment as application of scientific reasoning to problem of case conceptualization; development of conceptualization skills to integrate interview, objective assessment, and systematic observations; evaluation of different assessment approaches for empirical support and utility in case management; critical and analytic thinking, ethical and legal issues of professional conduct emphasized. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8434 - Clin Psychotherapies (3)
In-depth study of methods of psychotherapy and intervention strategies, their basic assumptions, spheres of applicability, and typical outcomes. Therapeutic approach covered will depend upon the particular instructor. May be repeated for maximum of 20 credits with change in topic. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8435 - Intro To Psychotherapy (3)
Required for all clinical students. Surveys major traditions of psychotherapy - psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, and systemic - considering originators' works as well as contemporary exponents; includes didactic (reading, discussion) and experiential learning (exercises, role plays) to promote both conceptual and practical acquaintance with the implications of each tradition. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8438 - Pract Clinical Trtmt (1-3)
Practical experience to students in clinical psychology, permitting them to work under professional supervision for 42 client contact hours in the Psychological Services Center. Students conduct intake interviews, administer and interpret psychological tests, and provide therapy. May be repeated for maximum of 24 hours credit. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate training program in clinical psychology. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8439 - Clin Assessmnt/Report Wrtng (3)
Develops strong assessment skills and ability to write comprehensive mental health reports; students perform assessments and receive instruction in the Psychological Services Center; instructor provides feedback on student's testing, analysis of tests, integration of tests into comprehensive understanding of client, and writing professional reports. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7/8412, 7/8428, 7/8432, and 7/8621. Grades of S/U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8440 - Behavioral Medicine I (3)
Overview of behavioral medicine and examination of psychologists' roles in healthcare settings; psychological and interpersonal factors that affect healthcare delivery will be examined, such as physician-patient communication, gender, and ethnic diversity; differences in ethical underpinnings between medicine and psychology will be explored. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8441 - Psyc/Medical Illness (3)
Addresses application of psychological principles to promote coping with medical disability and optimal healing; diagnostic interviewing and medical consulting skills emphasized; psychological and cognitive impact on various medical diseases and disorders reviewed; biological bases of behavior emphasized. Restricted by Program or by Permit. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8501 - Sem General Psychology (3)
Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8503 - Sem Experiment Psyc (3)
Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8506 - Sem Clinical Psyc (3)


PSYC 8507 - Sem Industrial Psyc (3)


PSYC 8509 - Sem School Psychology (3)


PSYC 8510 - Sem Organztnl Psych (3)


PSYC 8512 - Sem Develpmtal Psyc (3)


PSYC 8514 - Sem Cognitive Science (3)


PSYC 8515 - Sem Social Psychology (3)


PSYC 8516 - Issues Psychothrpy Rsch (3)
Research evidence pertaining to basic questions about psychotherapy and its effectiveness; classic contributions and current research findings. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8517 - Grant Prop Writing/Psyc (3)
Introduction to grant-writing process with emphasis on NIH funding; topics include identifying funding sources, grant writing and resubmissions, and grant reviewing; students prepare a suitable grant application as part of the course.

PSYC 8520 - Tchng Skills Grad Asst (3)
Overview of teaching responsibilities and skills and discussion of teaching issues for graduate teaching assistants; supervised practical experience teaching college courses and feedback on performance. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of graduate coordinator. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8601 - Res Prac Gen Psych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8602 - Res Pract Phys Psyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8603 - Res Prac Exp Psyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8604 - Res Prac Comp Psych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8605 - Res Prac Social Psych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8606 - Res Prac Clinical Psyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8607 - Res Prac Devlpmntl Psyc (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8608 - Res Prac Neuropsych (1-3)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8609 - Res Prac School Psych (1-3)
Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8610 - Field Prac Clin Psyc (1-6)
Supervised experience in the use of psychological diagnostic, treatment, or community intervention procedures in various community agencies and facilities. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. PREREQUISITE: Admission to the graduate training program in Clinical Psychology, or consent of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8611 - Fld Prac Soc-Indust (1-3)
Seminar discussion and supervised experience in the application of basic psychological procedures and principles to social, personnel, and organizational activities in various industrial, military and community settings. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8614 - Prac School Psyc (3)
Supervised experience in the application of psychological procedures in educational and clinical settings. A minimum of two practica are required. First practicum requires grades of 3.0 or better in PSYC 7803 and 7804; second requires 3.0 or better in PSYC 7805 and 7806, and S in first practicum. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate training program in school psychology and permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8615 - Special Problems (1-3)
Independent investigation of a research problem, or directed readings, in a selected area of psychology chosen in consultation with the instructor. Only six hours credit may be applied to the degree. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8616 - Clin Pract Neuropsyc (3)
The advanced student interested in neuropsychology will receive supervised experience in the use of psychodiagnostic techniques in various community settings; training covers basic diagnostic techniques, specialized diagnostic techniques, and neurological assessment procedures. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8618 - Res Prac Cogn Psych/Sci (1-3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8619 - Child/Family Practicum (1-3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8620 - Major Area Paper (3-6)
Independent investigation of an approved topic of the student's specialization, leading to the preparation of a publishable paper following the format of the Psychological Bulletin or the Psychological Review. Only 6 hours may be counted toward degree requirements. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8621 - Research Practicum (3)
This practicum is required of all first year doctoral students and others receiving department financial assistance and may be taken by General Psychology Masters students. This course serves to introduce the student to research currently being conducted by faculty in the Department of Psychology. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8622 - Res Prac: Behav Med (1-3)
May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

PSYC 8701 - Behavioral Neuroscience (3)
A comprehensive study of the relationships between brain function and behavior; topics include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, sensory systems, learning and memory, motor systems and disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8705 - Neuropsychopharmacology (3)
Overview of basic principles of neuropharmacology and contemporary issues in clinical psychopharmacology; introduces principles of pharmacokinetics and dynamics, drug-receptor pharmacology, neuroanalytical methodology, and chemical neuroanatomy of the brain; culminates with overviews of contemporary drug treatment strategies for a range of cognitive, pathological, and neurological disorders, including substance abuse. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8707 - Professional Issues (1)
Prepares late-doctoral students in school and clinical psychology for internship and future careers; includes developing a professional vita, articulating a theoretical orientation and professional identity, obtaining an internship, career options, effective supervision, licensure and private practice issues. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted to Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8800 - Intro School Psychology (3)
Survey of school psychology including historical foundations, roles and functions, school and community practices, standards and ethics, issues, technological developments; trends in credentialing and practice at the state and national level.

PSYC 8802 - Child Disability/Family (3)
An overview of childhood disability and family considerations applied to psychological services in school and agency settings; agency and family visitations provide experiential learning in addition to theory and research. PREREQUISITES: Course on characteristics of exceptional children and permission of instructor.

PSYC 8803 - Psych Ed Assessmnt I (4)
Critical analysis of intellectual assessment including skill development in administration, scoring, and interpretation of major individual tests of intelligence; related psychoeducational instruments with emphasis on case study data collection and report writing. PREREQUISITE: Admission to graduate studies in psychology or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 8804 - Psych Ed Assessmnt II (3)
Critical analysis of personality assessment including skill development in administration, scoring, and interpretation of major personality assessment techniques; related psychoeducational instruments with emphasis on case study data collection and report writing. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7803 and permission of instructor. School psychology students must have a grade of 3.0 or higher in PSYC 7803. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8805 - Psych Consultation (3)
This course teaches the theory and skills needed for providing consultation to students and families in educational and clinical settings; focusing on an ecological, problem-centered model, content will include factors influencing the consultation process at the individual, group, and system level. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8806 - Sch Psych Interventions (3)
Students will acquire skills needed to provide individual, group, family, and crisis intervention services to children and adolescents in educational and clinical settings; course material will include empirically-validated interventions focusing on issues related to the academic, social, emotional, and psychological needs of the child/adolescent. PREREQUISITE: PSYC 7805-8805, COUN 7542 or equivalent. School Psychology students must have a grade of 3.0 or higher in PSYCH 7805.

PSYC 8807 - Adv Sch Psych Intrvntn (3)
Students will refine skills in both direct and indirect school psychological services using empirically-validated interventions; course material will cover current intervention issues in school psychology, the role of supervision in school psychology, evaluating the efficacy of interventions, and the link between assessment and treatment planning. PREREQUISITES: PSYC 7803-8803, 7804-8804, 7805-8805, and 7806-8806. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8808 - Psychoed Assessment III (3)
Introduction to psychoeducational assessment of preschool children; includes issues surrounding early assessment, skill development with preschool instruments, and related report writing, conferencing. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

PSYC 8809 - Adv Sch Psych Practicum (3)
Applied experience utilizing both direct and indirect school psychological services and supervision; students will assume the role of case manager providing comprehensive services for multiple clients; students will also be expected to supervise students in the beginning intervention practicum. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8812 - Intern: School Psyc (3-6)
Supervised field placement in school and/or community agency settings; requires a minimum of 1200 hours for the EdS and 1500 for the PhD, at least half of which must be in a school setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours applied toward either degree. PREREQUISITE: Admission to the school psychology program, permission of program coordinator, grades of S in all previous practica. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given. Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 8900 - Psychology of Gender (3)
This course will examine how gender affects all aspects of our lives at both the societal/cultural level and the individual level within the societal/cultural context.

PSYC 8999 - Predoctoral Internship (0)
Psychology majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements.Restricted by Program or by Permit.

PSYC 9000 - Dissertation (1-9)
Independent research for Doctor of Philosophy degree. Application for writing a dissertation must be filled out on an approved form after consultation with the major professor and filed with the Graduate School. Only 9 hours may be counted toward degree requirements. Student must be enrolled in this course during the semester in which the student expects to graduate. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

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Last Updated: 6/17/14