Graduate Catalog
Communication

LEROY G. DORSEY, PhD
Department Chair
Art and Communication Building (ACB)
(901) 678-2565

ANTONIO de VELASCO, PhD
Coordinator of Graduate Studies
E-mail: adevelsc@memphis.edu


http://www.memphis.edu/communication/

I. The Department of Communication awards two graduate degrees: the Master of Arts degree with a major in Communication and concentrations in Communication or Film and Video Production, and the PhD with a major in Communication.

II. MA Program

A Master’s Degree in Communication from The University of Memphis prepares students for success in the many professional opportunities in this field and success in pursuing a doctoral degree in Communication. Students have a choice of two concentrations: communication or film and video production.

The Communication concentration offers students fundamentalgrounding in communication, media, andrhetoricaltheory. MA students in Communication work along side doctoral students in one of three areas (or a combination of areas):

Rhetoric, Politics, and Society 
Health Communication
Media, Technology and Society 

The Film and Video Production concentration combines technical instruction with courses in both motion picture and traditional communication studies to provide students with the tools and concepts necessary to function in the multifaceted world of audiovisual production. The approach to media practice is broad enough to address the needs of the independent artist, as well as those who seek to enter the industry. 

Program objectives are: (1) advanced understanding of classical rhetorical and social science research traditions, and the dominant thinkers, theories, and methods current in the field; (2) practice of effective communication strategies and interventions; and (3) ability to conduct and communicate scholarly research.

All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued.

A. Admissions Criteria

Multiple criteria will be used when considering applicant admission, including, but not limited to, undergraduate and graduate grade point average, GRE scores, personal goals statement, relevant employment history, letters of recommendation, and quality of the applicant’s writing sample. The number of students admitted to the MA program will depend on availability of adequate faculty supervision and other department resources. More specific admissions criteria can be found on our department website. GRE scores are required for every applicant. 

See the Department of Communication website for information on applying.

B. Initial Graduate Advising

Before registering for courses beyond nine hours of study, the student will form an MA advisory program committee consisting of three members of the department's graduate faculty. One of these three (who must have full graduate faculty status), by request of the student and the consent of the faculty member, will serve as advisory committee chair. 

C. Formation and Conduct of Master’s Advisory Committee

Role and Duties of MA Advisory Committee Chair and Members: All decisions pertaining to a student’s program must be approved by a consensus of the MA advisory committee, including meeting to approve a plan of study and approving the content of independent studies. Changes to the plan of study require advisory committee approval.

D. Program Requirements

  1. Successful completion of a minimum of 36 hours of graduate courses; 70% of the minimum must be at the 7000 level or above. The thesis, special project, and practicum, should a student choose one of these options, all carry academic credits, which count toward the minimum 36-hour requirement.
  2. Completion of the degree requires one of the following options; however students in Film and Video Production must complete option C, A Culminating Project:
    1. A written and oral comprehensive examination. Students must pass both a written and oral comprehensive exam during or after their last semester of course-work. The student’s MA advisory committee must approve the option and is responsible for evaluating the comprehensive examination. A pass on the written examination is necessary for admission to the oral examination. The quality of the comprehensive examination as a whole is determined at completion of the oral examination.
    2. A thesis and oral comprehensive examination. Three to six hours of COMM 7996, Thesis, are required. Students who elect this option should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write. On completion of the thesis, the student must successfully complete an oral comprehensive examination, which will include an oral defense of the thesis, administered by the student’s MA advisory committee. The thesis, defense, and examination must be acceptable to all members of the advisory committee and recommended to the Graduate School after a successful defense.
    3. A culminating project and oral comprehensive examination. This project must be completed under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty. The student’s MA advisory committee must approve the option, and the student must enroll in at least three credits of COMM 7994, Culminating Project, during or after the last semester of course work. The culminating project provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate their ability to work independently, as well as their mastery of an area of concentration in an applied form approved by their advisory committee. The project may take one of several forms, including a community-based communication intervention, or in the case of FVP students, a film or video production. On completion of the culminating project, the student must successfully complete an oral comprehensive examination, which will include an oral defense of the project, administered by the student’s MA advisory committee. The project, defense, and examination must be acceptable to all members of the student’s MA advisory committee. 
  3. All students must successfully complete two of the following core courses: COMM 7321 Communication Theory, COMM 7350 Rhetorical Theory, or COMM 7804 Seminar in Media Theory and Criticism.
  4. All students with a concentration in Film and Video Production must take three credits of COMM 7892, Film and Video Production, before beginning their final culminating project.
  5. Up to nine hours outside the department may be applied to the minimum hour requirement with the approval of the student’s MA advisory committee.
  6. Up to six semester hours earned at another institution may be applied to the minimum hour requirement with the approval of the student’s MA advisory committee.

E. Graduate Assistantships

  1. Graduate assistantships are available and are awarded on a competitive basis within the department. Assistantships are normally renewed for one year depending upon the performance of assistantship duties and the progress being made towards a degree.
  2. All graduate assistants must register for 12 hours of credit (or for six hours if enrolled in thesis or dissertation hours only). Three of these must be chosen from COMM 7001, Research Assistantship, 7002, Intro/Intermediate Teaching, or 7003, Advanced Teaching Techniques. 
  3. Further details are available on the department website.

F. Time Limitation

All requirements for the degree must be completed in 6 calendar years.

G. Retention

At the end of every academic year, the graduate faculty in the Department of Communication evaluates the progress of every MA student in the program. For a student to continue in the program, he or she must maintain satisfactory progress. The student will be judged as NOT making satisfactory progress if:

  1. The student’s cumulative GPA drops below 3.0 and remains there for more than one semester or nine credit hours.
  2. The student has acquired more incompletes than he or she can complete during one semester of normal academic work.

Should a student fail to maintain satisfactory progress, the Graduate Committee, in conjunction with the department chair, can recommend to the CCFA Associate Dean for Graduate Affairs and the U of M Vice Provost of Graduate Programs that the student be dropped from the program. Moreover, students found by the Office of Student Conduct to have committed misconduct will be sanctioned by the University in accordance with the policies contained in the “Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities.” In these cases, the Department may also recommend to the CCFA Associate Dean for Graduate Affairs and the U of M Vice Provost of Graduate Programs that the student be dropped from the program.

H. Departmental MA Guidelines

Additional details and information are available on the department website.

III. PhD Program

The PhD program offers three areas of specialization:

Rhetoric, Politics, and Society 

This area considers the core question of rhetoric’s role in the diverse settings of America’s cultures. Located in a city with a rich and controversial legacy, students study the influence of public address, advocacy, media, and the arts on the multiple meanings of American citizenry and human identity.

Health Communication 

The focus area in Health Communication provides an interdisciplinary experience in the theoretical and research practices in the study of health communication and includes rhetorical, social scientific, and critical cultural perspectives.  

Media, Technology, and Society 

The Media, Technology, and Society emphasis offers a diverse, interdisciplinary approach to the study of how communication technologies and cultural processes shape identities, communities, relationships, and subjectivities. 

All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued. 

A. Admissions Criteria

Admission to the PhD program requires an MA in Communication, Rhetoric, or a related field from an accredited institution. Multiple criteria will be used when considering your application for admission, including, but not limited to, undergraduate and graduate grade point average, GRE scores, personal goals statement, writing samples, relevant employment history, letters of recommendation, and the quality of the applicant’s writing. The number of students admitted to the PhD program will depend on availability of adequate faculty supervision and other department resources. More specific admissions criteria can be found on our department website. GRE scores are required for every applicant.

See the Department of Communication website for information on applying.

B. Initial Graduate Advising

Before registering for courses beyond nine hours of study, the student will choose a major advisor. Before registering for courses beyond 18 hours of study, the student will form a PhD advisory program committee consisting of their major advisor to serve as chair, two members of the department's graduate faculty, and one member from outside the department. Students must also submit a Plan of Study, approved by their committee, before registering for course work beyond 18 hours. 

C. Role of the PhD Advisory Committee

Role and Duties of the PhD Advisory Committee Chair and Members: All decisions pertaining to a student’s program must be approved by a consensus of the PhD advisory committee, including meeting to approve a plan of study and approving the content of independent studies. Changes to the plan of study require advisory committee approval. See information below on comprehensive exams and dissertation for more information on the role of the advisory committee.

D. Program Requirements

  1. It is expected that students maintain a GPA of 3.0 throughout the PhD program. Should the student’s GPA fall below 3.0, nine semester hours will be allowed to correct the deficiency. At the request of the student’s PhD advisory committee and at the discretion of the department chair and the graduate committee, this period may be extended 9 additional semester hours. The student must have obtained a GPA of at least 3.0 before registering for dissertation credit hours. Any assistantship is forfeited if a student is put on probation. 
  2. Students must earn at least 60 semester hours beyond the master’s degree as approved by their PhD committee, including a minimum of 15 hours for combined pro-seminar and dissertation credits and a minimum of 6 hours taken from outside of the Department of Communication.
  3. Research Tool or Analytic Specialty. Students must demonstrate competence in the research tool or analytic specialty required for completion of their dissertation. Competence can be demonstrated in a variety of ways to be determined by the student's advisory committee.
  4. Core Competencies. Students must have competency in three areas: Communication Theory, Media Theory, and Rhetorical Theory. These competencies can be satisfied academically in a variety of ways in consultation with the student's advisor.
  5. Residency Requirements. A minimum of 2 consecutive semesters (Fall/Spring or Spring/Fall) in residence (with a course load of 9 hours per semester) beyond the master’s degree must be completed prior to registering for dissertation credit. The summer session will not count as one of the required semesters.
  6. Comprehensive Examination. The examination will consist of a written and an oral portion. At the completion of the students’ course-work (at least 45 hours), the student shall take a comprehensive exam over the areas covered in the student’s program. The content of the examination for each student will depend on the nature of the student’s program and the areas of concentration. The precise distribution of the 10 hours of the written exam and the areas that it will cover will be determined by the student’s PhD advisory committee. When appropriate, questions may be solicited from other faculty members to supplement those provided by the PhD advisory committee members. The comprehensive examination, which is both written and oral, is the primary basis on which the faculty of the department determine whether the student is ready to embark upon the program of research and writing culminating in the dissertation. The PhD advisory committee administers the comprehensive examination. At the close of the oral portion, the PhD advisory committee, after considering the quality of both oral and written responses, will determine the outcome. Students will not be allowed to take the comprehensive examination or submit a dissertation prospectus if they have any Incompletes outstanding in the approved program of study.
  7. Dissertation Requirements
    1. On successful completion of the comprehensive examination the student shall select a dissertation director and, in consultation with the director, invite three additional faculty members to serve as the students’ dissertation advisory committee. It is recommended that one member of the advisory committee be from outside the discipline. The dissertation director serves as the chair of the dissertation committee. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
    2. Dissertation Proposal Defense. The student shall submit a proposal for the dissertation to the dissertation advisory committee and defend the proposal before the committee. To be considered as "making satisfactory progress," a candidate must have his/her prospectus approved within two semesters of completion of the comprehensive examination.
    3. Dissertation Defense. The dissertation director will circulate a complete draft of the dissertation to all advisory committee members, who will be given the opportunity to provide feedback. The student will then make the required revisions, submit them to the dissertation director, and circulate them to all advisory committee members. This process will continue until a majority of the dissertation advisory committee formally agrees that the dissertation is ready to be defended. At that time, the dissertation director will schedule an oral defense of the dissertation. On approval of all of the members of the dissertation advisory committee, the dissertation will be submitted to the Graduate School for final approval and the degree awarded.
  8. Departmental PhD Guidelines. Additional details and information are available in the departmental PhD Guidelines found on the department website.

E. Graduate Assistantships

  1. Graduate assistantships are available and are awarded on a competitive basis within the department. Assistantships are normally renewed for one year depending upon the performance of assistantship duties and the progress being made toward a degree.
  2. All graduate assistants must register for 12 hours of credit (or for six hours if enrolled in thesis or dissertation hours only). Three of these must be chosen from COMM 8001, Research Assistantship, 8002, Intro/Intermediate Teaching, or 8003, Advanced Teaching Techniques.
  3. More details are available on the department website.

F. Time Limit

 

All requirements for the degree must be completed in 12 calendar years.

G. Retention

At the end of every academic year, the graduate faculty in the Department of Communication evaluates the progress of every PHD student in the program. For a student to continue in the program, he or she must maintain satisfactory progress. The student will be judged as NOT making satisfactory progress if:

  1. The student’s cumulative GPA drops below 3.0 and remains there for more than one semester or nine credit hours.
  2. The student has acquired more incompletes than he or she can complete during one semester of normal academic work.
  3. The student fails the Comprehensive exam.
  4. The student’s coursework does not demonstrate promise for independent scholarly work.

Should a student fail to maintain satisfactory progress, the Graduate Committee, in conjunction with the department chair, can recommend to the CCFA Associate Dean for Graduate Affairs and the U of M Vice Provost of Graduate Programs that the student be dropped from the program. Moreover, students found by the Office of Student Conduct to have committed misconduct will be sanctioned by the University in accordance with the policies contained in the “Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities.” In these cases, the Department may also recommend to the CCFA Associate Dean for Graduate Affairs and the U of M Vice Provost of Graduate Programs that the student be dropped from the program.


COMMUNICATION (COMM)

In addition to the courses below, the department may offer the following Special Topics courses:
COMM 6210-19. Special Topics in Communication Studies. (1-3). Topics are varied and announced in the online class listings. May be repeated for maximum of 9 hours when topic varies.

COMM 6220-29. Special Topics in Film. (1-3). Topics are varied and announced in online class listings. May be repeated for maximum of 9 hours when topic varies.

COMM 7210-19–8210-19. Special Topics in Communication Studies. (1-3). Topics are varied and announced in online class listings. May be repeated for maximum of 9 hours when topic varies.

 


COMM 6011 - Communctn In Orgnztns (3)
Communication systems and problems in contemporary organizations with emphasis on the role of communication in corporate culture and in organizational change.

COMM 6012 - Health Communication (3)
Examination of the role of communication in health care; application of communication theory and practice to the health care context from provider-patient interaction to cultural influences on health.

COMM 6013 - Political Communication (3)
Investigation of various forms of political communication; texts drawn primarily from current political disputes in the US; focus on improving basic skills of critical thinking and writing about civic life.

COMM 6014 - Communication in Internet (3)
Research and theories examining role of the Internet and new technologies in everyday interaction; interpersonal and group communication, language change, online communities and social networks, identity and self-presentation online.

COMM 6340 - Listening (3)
Exploration of communication theory and practice from the perspective of listening; emphasis on philosophical, practical, and personal dimensions of listening as an art of being as well as a mode of doing.

COMM 6341 - Interprsnl Communicatn (3)
Theory, research, and practice regarding dyadic communication.

COMM 6342 - Small Group Communcatn (3)
Advanced study of group communication theory emphasizing group membership, member perceptions, group development, group process, and group outcomes.

COMM 6360 - American Eloquence (3)
Examination of notable public discourse from founding of the republic through the twentieth century; religious and secular foundations of American rhetoric; tensions of inclusion and exclusion in development of national self-understanding.

COMM 6363 - Dialogue (3)
Theoretical, philosophical, and practical exploration of dialogic communication and relations.

COMM 6364 - Voices/American Women (3)
Examines history of women's public discourse in the US from 19th through 20th centuries; considers social and cultural significance of women's participation in public discourse; issues of credibility and nature of argument both within and about women's public address.

COMM 6365 - Place/Community/Comm (3)
Explores interrelationships among human interaction, created places, and the natural world; emphasizes communication environment, broadly conceived, and its effects on community.

COMM 6373 - Interracial Comm (3)
The social problems encountered in communication between blacks and whites; readings, discussion, and field study on how prejudice, stereotypes, and self-concepts can affect communication; exploration of rhetorical methods to minimize these problems.

COMM 6375 - Intercultrl Communicatn (3)
Special problems encountered in communication between people of different cultural backgrounds; focus on understanding communicative interaction between and among people with different national/cultural backgrounds and functioning more effectively in multicultural settings.

COMM 6380 - Communication/Conflict (3)
Theories and methods of conflict management and resolution, focusing on practical communication skills; emphasis on concepts of perception, listening, and peacemaking.

COMM 6802 - Internship (1-3)
Field studies in communication; supervised practical work with government institutions, private business, film company, or broadcast and electronic media firm; written analysis of experience required. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 semester hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

COMM 6810 - Broadcast Reg/Prog Pol (3)
Effects of FCC and other governmental regulations on broadcasting and electronic media management and operations; licensing, renewals, content control, politics, and copyright.

COMM 6811 - Media 2.0 (3)
Examination of long tail phenomenon and other theories behind convergent media; people and organizations producing and distributing their work on the Internet and other alternative channels; exploration of how these new distribution forms challenges and assumptions about how mass media should and does work.

COMM 6812 - Comm Law/Prfrmng Arts (3)
Artist, performer, management contractual relationships; acquisition, copyright, and disposition of literary and audio-visual properties; production and distribution agreements; advertising law and other matters for TV, motion picture, radio, and stage businesses.

COMM 6822 - Audio Prdctn Film/Video (3)
Intermediate principles and practices of audio (recording, editing, mixing, and design) with emphasis on film and video production. PREREQUISITE: Minimum grade of "C" in COMM 3824 or permission of instructor.

COMM 6824 - Cinema/Videography (3)
Art of visual interpretation with a strong concentration in the theory and techniques of lighting. Experience with professional film and video cameras and lighting equipment. PREREQUISITE: COMM 3824.

COMM 6825 - Editing/Post Production (3)
Aesthetics of continuity development in variety of editing styles; editing techniques and post-production procedures for both video and double system film. PREREQUISITE: Minimum grade of "C" in COMM 3824 or permission of instructor.

COMM 6831 - Broadcast/Cable Sale/Ad (3)
Relation of broadcasting and cable sales and advertising to networks, station representatives, and salespeople; role of sponsors, agencies, and allied groups.

COMM 6841 - Television Workshop (4)
Production of television programming for local cablecasting. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 semester hours; repetition will not result in change of any grade previously given. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

COMM 6842 - TV Studio Production II (4)
Advanced training in TV studio/multiple camera techniques; extensive production work. PREREQUISITE: COMM 3842.

COMM 6850 - Film History I (3)
(6852). Historical survey of motion pictures from medium's pre-history to 1940 with emphasis on narrative film.

COMM 6851 - Film History II (3)
Historical survey of major movements, genres, and themes in narrative film from 1940 to 1960.

COMM 6853 - Documentary Form Film (3)
Development of non-fiction film as rhetorical and expressive form; analysis of individual films, genres, and filmmakers.

COMM 6854 - Documentary Form/Broadcasting (3)
History, theory, and criticism of non-fiction broadcasting, including docudrama and television documentaries.

COMM 6856 - Women And Film (3)
Women as performers, viewers, subjects, and creators in American and international film.

COMM 6857 - Hist Brdcast/Elec Media (3)
Comprehensive history of broadcast and electronic media as developed from 1895 to present.

COMM 6858 - Contemporary Cinema (3)
Major themes and styles in international and American narrative film from 1960 to present.

COMM 6871 - Broadcast/Cable Mgmt (3)
Theories of management; special problems and situations confronting managers of broadcast and cable outlets, including personnel, engineering operations, programming, and sales functions. PREREQUISITE: COMM 3800.

COMM 6891 - Produce/Direct Film/Vid (3)
Research and script preparation; budgeting and production management; working with actors and crew. PREREQUISITE: Minimum grade of C in COMM 3824 or permission of instructor.

COMM 6960 - Documentary Writing (3)
Writing for nonfiction media.

COMM 6970 - Screenwriting (3)
Writing for fiction film and television. Basic dramatic theory, narrative structure, characterization, dialogue, adaptation and unique demands of audio/visual media.

COMM 7002 - Intro/Intermediate Teaching (3)
Overview and practical demonstrations of the art of teaching oral communication; discussion of instructional issues including the role of race, ethnicity, and nationality in classroom interactions. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Communication majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements. PREREQUISITE: Graduate teaching assistant in Department of Communication. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 7003 - Advanced Teaching Techniques (3)
Discussion of pedagogy for the traditional classroom and other instructional settings (e.g. corporate training); may include interning in and teaching courses in addition to oral communication. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Communication majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements. PREREQUISITE: Graduate teaching assistant in Department of Communication. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 7012 - Seminar Health Comm (3)
(Same as ENGL 7012-8012). Examines current issues in health communication research, including patient-provider relationships, new technologies and health promotion, and health organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

COMM 7013 - Sem Political Comm (3)
Survey of critical and rhetorical theories of contemporary US political discourse; examines relationships among rhetoric, culture, and state power; assignments lead toward preparation of manuscript for eventual publication. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 7014 - Public Health Communication (3)
Explores the communication processes and practices that can be used to promote positive change in health behaviors, including the rhetorical exigencies inherent in public health care communication, the various formats for disseminating medical information, and the specific audience needs that health care communication must address.

COMM 7321 - Communication Theory (3)
Theories, models, and approaches to study of communication.

COMM 7322 - Persuasion & Influence (3)
Topical seminar examining how people use communication to alter attitudes and behaviors of others in public and face-to-face settings; covers various social-scientific theories and research areas of persuasion and interpersonal influence. May be repeated for maximum of 9 hours.

COMM 7331 - Sem Communication Thry (3)
Specific topics, issues, and research in communication theory. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 7332 - Seminar Comm Research (3)
Examination of particular methodologies in communication research. Content will vary in response to current issues in the field. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

COMM 7345 - Health Literacy (3)
(Same as PUBH 7345-8345) This course will introduce students to the issues of health literacy from a public health perspective. We will explore the impact of health literacy on access to care, vulnerable populations, management of chronic illness, mental health, healthcare costs, and several other areas.

COMM 7350 - Rhetorical Theory (3)
(Same as ENGL 7350-8350). History of rhetoric from the sophists through the present; may include reading from Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Erasmus, Ramus, Campbell, Blair, John Q. Adams, and others.

COMM 7362 - Sem Public Address (3)
Intensive study of selected topics in the analysis and criticism of public arguments; emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of arguments and appeal in common rhetorical situations. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

COMM 7369 - Sem Org Communications (3)
Selected variables of organizational communication with emphasis on methods of analyzing and auditing communication within the organizational setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 7371 - Rhetorical Criticism (3)
(Same as ENGL 7371-8371). Examines principal modes of contemporary rhetorical analysis. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor for non-degree-seeking students.

COMM 7374 - Independent Studies Comm Arts (1-3)
Independent research in areas of special interest including rhetoric, communication, and film and video production. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor. Grades of A-F will be given.

COMM 7432 - Quant Research Methods (3)
(Same as ENGL 7432-8432). Survey of quantitative research in communication; practical experience in collecting and analyzing quantitative information.

COMM 7434 - Qual Research Methods (3)
Survey of qualitative research in communication. Practical experience in collecting and analyzing qualitative information.

COMM 7450 - Sem Interpersonal Comm (3)
Selected examination of theory about one-on-one interactions, related research, and application of that theory and research in diverse interpersonal contexts. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 7460 - Sem Group Comm (3)
Examination of the theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of group communication focusing on both the task and relational orientations of group interaction. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 7472 - Org Culture & Change (3)
Examination of the wide variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to culture, identification of types of organizational cultures, and tracking cultural evolution.

COMM 7474 - Supv Comm & Leadership (3)
Examination of the communication issues, strategies, and concepts involved in supervisory communication effectiveness. Review of current research regarding supervision, leadership, and teams.

COMM 7616 - Contemp Rhet Theory (3)
Examines the relationship between rhetorical theory and contemporary philosophy, especially poststructuralism, neo-pragmatism, and hermeneutics.

COMM 7621 - Seminar Argumentation (3)
(Same as ENGL 7621-8621). Examines historical and contemporary argumentation theories and how those theories are incorporated into teaching oral argumentation and composition.

COMM 7632 - Sem Rhet Criticism (3)
Examination of the principal modes of contemporary rhetorical analysis such as Neoclassical, Burkean, Feminist, Cultural/Critical, and Poststructuralist. Repeatable for 9 hours.

COMM 7802 - Seminar Film Criticism (3)
Intensive study of selected periods, genres, or filmmakers with emphasis on independent research project. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

COMM 7804 - Sem Media Theory/Crit (3)
Major critical approaches to media form and content; emphasis on film and television. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

COMM 7806 - Trends Mass Communicatn (3)
Critical issue or issues facing communications today. Topics will vary each time offered. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

COMM 7808 - Mass Comm & Society (3)
Interrelationships between mass communications, the individual, and society. Topics will vary each time offered. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

COMM 7809 - Sem Communication Hist (3)
Selected topics in history of communication, including public address, film, broadcasting, and electronic media. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

COMM 7815 - Sem History Rhetoric (3)
(Same as ENGL 7815-8815). Examines different periods and issues of rhetorical history each semester; one semester will consider Greek rhetoric (beginnings through New Testament); another will consider Latin rhetoric (Cicero through Renaissance); a third will cover Scottish, British, and American rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours when topic varies.

COMM 7819 - Rhetoric Of Science (3)
(Same as ENGL 7819-8819).This course examines scientific and technical communication from a rhetorical perspective, showing how scientific knowledge is shaped not only by data and method, but also by persuasive purposes and sociocultural forces.

COMM 7820 - Topics In Rhetoric (3)
(Same as ENGL 7820-8820). Topical seminar devoted to an important aspect of the history, theory, or criticism of rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours when topic varies.

COMM 7892 - Film/Video Production (1-3)
Workshop for film and video production. Students write, produce, direct, or assume crew responsibilities on productions. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. See departmental guidelines for independent production requirements and procedures. PREREQUISITE: COMM 3824 or permission of instructor. Grades of A-F will be given.

COMM 7991 - Sem Comparative Media (3)
To demonstrate through intensive analysis what happens to the form and content of a creative work in its various adaptations: novel, condensation, stage, movie, and television. Open to all Theatre and Dance, Communication, and English majors.

COMM 7993 - Special Problems (1-3)
Directed individual investigation of special research projects not included in thesis. Grades of A-F will be given.

COMM 7994 - Culminating Project (3-6)
Culminating research project in lieu of a thesis. Course may be repeated up to 6 hours. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 7995 - Production Practicum (3-6)
Creative performance or production project suitable for public presentation and/or a practical application. Project to be determined in consultation with and directed by the student's supervisory committee. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 7996 - Thesis (1-6)
Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

COMM 8002 - Intro/Interm Tchng Tech (3)
Overview and practical demonstrations of the art of teaching oral communication; discussion of instructional issues including the role of race, ethnicity, and nationality in classroom interactions. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Communication majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements. PREREQUISITE: Graduate teaching assistant in Department of Communication. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 8003 - Advanced Teaching Techniques (3)
Discussion of pedagogy for the traditional classroom and other instructional settings (e.g. corporate training); may include interning in and teaching courses in addition to oral communication. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credit hours. Communication majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements. PREREQUISITE: Graduate teaching assistant in Department of Communication. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 8012 - Seminar Health Comm (3)
(Same as ENGL 7012-8012). Examines current issues in health communication research, including patient-provider relationships, new technologies and health promotion, and health organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

COMM 8013 - Sem Political Comm (3)
Survey of critical and rhetorical theories of contemporary US political discourse; examines relationships among rhetoric, culture, and state power; assignments lead toward preparation of manuscript for eventual publication. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 8014 - Public Health Communication (3)
Explores the communication processes and practices that can be used to promote positive communication processes and practices that can be used to promote positive change in health behaviors, including the rhetorical exigencies inherent in public health care communication, the various formats for disseminating medical information, and the specific audience needs that health care communication must address.

COMM 8321 - Communication Theory (3)
Theories, models, and approaches to study of communication.

COMM 8322 - Persuasion & Influence (3)
Topical seminar examining how people use communication to alter attitudes and behaviors of others in public and face-to-face settings; covers various social-scientific theories and research areas of persuasion and interpersonal influence. May be repeated for maximum of 9 hours.

COMM 8331 - Sem Communication Thry (3)
Specific topics, issues, and research in communication theory. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 8332 - Seminar Comm Rsearch (3)
Examination of particular methodologies in communication research. Content will vary in response to current issues in the field. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

COMM 8345 - Health Literacy (3)
(Same as PUBH 7345-8345) This course will introduce students to the issues of health literacy from a public health perspective. We will explore the impact of health literacy on access to care, vulnerable populations, management of chronic illness, mental health, healthcare costs, and several other areas.

COMM 8350 - Rhetorical Theory (3)
(Same as ENGL 7350-8350). History of rhetoric from the sophists through the present; may include reading from Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Erasmus, Ramus, Campbell, Blair, John Q. Adams, and others.

COMM 8362 - Seminar Public Address (3)
Intensive study of selected topics in the analysis and criticism of public arguments; emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of arguments and appeal in common rhetorical situations. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

COMM 8369 - Sem Org Communications (3)
Selected variables of organizational communication with emphasis on methods of analyzing and auditing communication within the organizational setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 8371 - Rhetorical Criticism (3)
(Same as ENGL 7371-8371). Examines principal modes of contemporary rhetorical analysis. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor for non-degree-seeking students.

COMM 8374 - Independent Studies Comm Arts (1-3)
Independent research in areas of special interest including rhetoric, communication, and film and video production. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor. Grades of A-F will be given.

COMM 8432 - Quant Research Methods (3)
(Same as ENGL 7432-8432). Survey of quantitative research in communication; practical experience in collecting and analyzing quantitative information.

COMM 8434 - Qual Research Methods (3)
Survey of qualitative research in communication. Practical experience in collecting and analyzing qualitative information.

COMM 8450 - Sem Interpersonal Comm (3)
Selected examination of theory about one-on-one interactions, related research, and application of that theory and research in diverse interpersonal contexts. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 8460 - Sem Group Comm (3)
Examination of the theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of group communication focusing on both the task and relational orientations of group interaction. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours credit.

COMM 8472 - Org Culture & Change (3)
Examination of the wide variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to culture, identification of types of organizational cultures, and tracking cultural evolution.

COMM 8474 - Supv Comm & Leadership (3)
Examination of the communication issues, strategies, and concepts involved in supervisory communication effectiveness. Review of current research regarding supervision, leadership, and teams.

COMM 8616 - Comtemp Rhet Theory (3)
Examines the relationship between rhetorical theory and contemporary philosophy, especially poststructuralism, neo-pragmatism, and hermeneutics.

COMM 8621 - Seminar Argumentation (3)
(Same as ENGL 7621-8621). Examines historical and contemporary argumentation theories and how those theories are incorporated into teaching oral argumentation and composition.

COMM 8632 - Sem Rhet Criticism (3)
Examination of the principal modes of contemporary rhetorical analysis such as Neoclassical, Burkean, Feminist, Cultural/Critical, and Poststructuralist. Repeatable for 9 hours.

COMM 8802 - Seminar Film Criticism (3)
Intensive study of selected periods, genres, or filmmakers with emphasis on independent research project. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

COMM 8804 - Sem Media Theory/Crit (3)
Major critical approaches to media form and content; emphasis on film and television. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

COMM 8806 - Trends Mass Communicatn (3)
Critical issue or issues facing communications today. Topics will vary each time offered. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

COMM 8808 - Mass Comm & Society (3)
Interrelationships between mass communications, the individual, and society. Topics will vary each time offered. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

COMM 8809 - Sem Communication Hist (3)
Selected topics in history of communication, including public address, film, broadcasting, and electronic media. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

COMM 8815 - Sem History Rhetoric (3)
(Same as ENGL 7815-8815). Examines different periods and issues of rhetorical history each semester; one semester will consider Greek rhetoric (beginnings through New Testament); another will consider Latin rhetoric (Cicero through Renaissance); a third will cover Scottish, British, and American rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours when topic varies.

COMM 8819 - Rhetoric Of Science (3)
(Same as ENGL 7819-8819).This course examines scientific and technical communication from a rhetorical perspective, showing how scientific knowledge is shaped not only by data and method, but also by persuasive purposes and sociocultural forces.

COMM 8820 - Topics In Rhetoric (3)
(Same as ENGL 7820-8820). Topical seminar devoted to an important aspect of the history, theory, or criticism of rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours when topic varies.

COMM 8993 - Special Problems (1-3)
Directed individual investigation of special research projects not included in thesis. Grades of A-F will be given.

COMM 8995 - Production Practicum (3-6)
Creative performance or production project suitable for public presentation and/or a practical application. Project to be determined in consultation with and directed by the student's supervisory committee. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 8996 - Reading for Comps (1-9)
Arranged on an individual basis for communication students only. May be taken only at the end of coursework to fulfill the requirements for the PhD. Does not count toward the 45 hours of academic coursework required for the degree. Grades of S, U, or I will be given.

COMM 9000 - Dissertation (1-9)
For students who have passed their comprehensive exam and have an approved prospectus to write their dissertation under the direction of their advisor. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

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