Department of History College of Arts and Sciences
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News about the Department of History and its faculty, staff, students, and alumni

Archives of History Happenings are available for:

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The department periodically publishes a newsletter.

For upcoming events, consult the Calendar of Events.

History Happenings Archive for 2006


Dr Beverly Bond and Dr Doug Cupples appear in television documentary on the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr.

[17 December 2006] Dr Beverly Bond, Associate Professor, and Dr Doug Cupples, Instructor, appeared on the History Channel this weekend in interviews on the assassination of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. The program was part of a series entitled “Our Generation,” hosted by Steve Gillon, Professor of History and former Honors Dean at the University of Oklahoma and now the History Channel’s historian-in-residence.


Dr Robert Frankle honored at retirement reception

[8 December 2006] Dr Robert Frankle, Associate Professor, who has taught at The University of Memphis since 1970, is retiring at the end of the semester. The Department had a retirement reception for him this afternoon in the lobby of Mitchell Hall, when faculty, family, and friends honored him with gifts and tributes for his service. (Dr Frankle also had tribute paid to him recently in an article in the 2006 departmental newsletter. Please read that article for a full account of his achievements and honors.)

Dr Frankle is not severing ties with the department. After a semester of rest, he will be teaching courses over the next several years under the post-retirement employment arrangement.

Below are some photographs of the reception made by Dr Doug Cupples and Dr Maurice Crouse.

First photo
Some of the faculty, family, and friends who gathered

Second photo
Dr Frankle with a plaque honoring his career

Third photo
Dr Sherman presenting a card and gift certificate

Fourth photo
Dr W. R. (Bob) Brown speaking in a tribute to Dr Frankle

Fifth photo
Dr Frankle listening to the tribute

Sixth photo
Dr Frankle with his daughter Margrethe


Dr Doug Cupples speaks on art and art education in Memphis at meeting of West Tennessee Historical Society

[8 December 2006] Dr Doug Cupples, Instructor, spoke at a meeting of the West Tennessee Historical Society on 4 December on the topic “From Atelier to MFA (Then on the Atelier): A Short History of Professional Art and Art Education In Memphis,” an overview of his current research. Using oral history interviews and the sources in both the Mississippi Valley Collection at The University of Memphis and the Memphis Room at the City Public Library, the program reviewed the late nineteenth-century Memphis painters Carl Gutherz, Kate Carl, and Mary Solare, who were all classically trained in European academies and who received considerable fame on the continent. Emphasis was given to the formation of the Memphis Art Association in 1914 and the establishment of the Brooks Museum of Art and the Memphis Academy of Art and its predecessors. The course of studies leading to the awarding of Master of Fine Arts degrees and the return of classical training in the later 1990s were also a part of the program.


Dr Jonathan Judaken’s book on Sartre published by University of Nebraska Press

Judaken book jacket[23 November 2006] Dr Jonathan Judaken’s book Jean-Paul Sartre and the Jewish Question: Anti-antisemitism and the Politics of the French Intellectual is now available from University of Nebraska Press. The publication comes at the sixtieth anniversary of Sartre’s famous tract Réflexions sur la question juive.

The book, which has already been reviewed favorably by such scholars as Robert Bernasconi, author of How to Read Sartre; Dominick LaCapra, Bowmar Professor of Humanistic Studies, Cornell University; and Christian Delacampagne, Professor of French, Johns Hopkins University, is described by the publisher as follows:

Jean-Paul Sartre and the Jewish Question examines the image of “the Jew” in Sartre’s work to rethink not only his oeuvre but also the role of the intellectual in France and the politics and ethics of existentialism. It explores more broadly how French identity is defined through the abstraction and allegorization of “the Jew” and examines the role anti-antisemitic intellectuals play in this process.

Jonathan Judaken reconsiders the origins of the intellectual in France in the context of the Dreyfus affair and Sartre’s interventions in the parallel Franco- French conflicts in the 1930s and during the Vichy regime. He considers what it was possible to say on behalf of Jews and Judaism during the German occupation, Sartre’s contribution after the war to the Vichy syndrome, his positions on the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the ways Sartre’s reflections on the Jewish Question served as a template for his shift toward Marxism, his resistance to colonialism, and for the defining of debates about Jews and Judaism in postwar France by both Jewish and non-Jewish intellectuals. Judaken analyzes the texts that Sartre devoted to these issues and argues that “the Jew” constituted a foil Sartre consistently referenced in reflecting on politics in general and on the role of the intellectual in particular.


Graduate Association for African American History has successful food drive

[22 November 2006] The Graduate Association for African American History recently concluded a successful Canned Food/ Penny Drive, collecting 200 items of canned or non-perishable goods and $217.05 in cash. The proceeds were donated to the Metropolitan Inter-Faith Association (MIFA) and the Memphis Food Bank. GAAAH plans to make the drive an annual event and thanks all who contributed to the current drive.


Dr Dennis Laumann elected to head Ghana Studies Council

[20 November 2006] At the annual meeting of the Ghana Studies Council this past weekend in San Francisco, Dr Dennis Laumann, Associate Professor, was chosen as the Chair-elect. His three-year term begins in Fall 2007, an especially significant period to serve as Chair since the nation of Ghana celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2007.

The Ghana Studies Council is an organization of scholars based in Africa, North America, Europe, and Asia, whose research focuses on Ghana. In addition to producing a newsletter, the Ghana Studies Council publishes a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal, Ghana Studies (http://people.tamu.edu/~yarak/ghana_studies.html), based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The Chair’s duties include coordinating the publications of the council, leading the annual meeting, and representing Ghana specialists in meetings with other academic organizations and governmental bodies.


Roy Hopper receives Donovan travel fund grant

[20 November 2006] Roy Hopper, doctoral candidate in the field of Egyptology, has been awarded a grant from the Donovan Travel Enrichment Fund to support his research in Spring 2007.


Dr Nigel Strudwick delivers inaugural Murnane Memorial Lecture

[15 November 2006] In the first lecture in the Murnane Memorial Lecture series, Dr Nigel Strudwick spoke this evening, under the sponsorship of the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology and the Department of History, on “Texts from the Pyramid Age: The Written Records of the Old Kingdom.” The lecture series honors Dr William J. Murnane, a University of Memphis professor and internationally known Egyptologist who died 17 November 2000. After receiving degrees from the University of Chicago, Murnane did field work for many years at the Karnak Temple near Luxor, Egypt. After joining the U of M’s Department of History in 1987, he taught courses in Egyptology and ancient history while continuing his field work on the Great Hypostyle Hall in the temple at Karnak.

Mariam Ayad and Nigel Strudwick

Dr Mariam Ayad, Assistant Director of IEAA, and Dr Strudwick

Dr Strudwick began by reminiscing about his acquaintance with Dr Murnane, which began in Luxor in 1984. A classic story involved Dr Murnane’s love of opera, which prompted him on one moonlit night in the Valley of the Kings to burst into song, only to be halted by two gun shots. The next morning he was told that guards in the valley had thought they were shooting at a hyena. Dr Murnane was editing Dr Strudwick’s book Texts of the Pyramid Age at the time he died. Dr Strudwick wrote the obituary which appeared in the Manchester Guardian.

The texts which Dr Strudwick discussed in his illustrated lecture came from Dynasties 3-8 in the Old Kingdom period, approximately 2707-2170 BCE. Some papyrus texts have survived, but those inscribed on stone are much more abundant. The types of texts illustrated and explained in the lecture ranged broadly in nature, including, among others, royal decrees, administrative texts, service lists, legal texts such as records of house purchases, and biographical information. Dr Strudwick remarked that many of the texts are difficult to understand because we live in a very different culture, and even now many persons cannot understand administrative and legal materials of our own time. He gave fullest consideration to biographical materials, noting that most of them do not tell us very much about what the persons did, but concentrate rather on emphasizing how unique their exploits were and how highly they were regarded and rewarded by the king.

Dr Strudwick is Assistant Keeper in the Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan at the British Museum in London, where he is the curator of the sculpture collection, traveling exhibitions, and technological issues. (In her introduction, Dr Mariam Ayad, Assistant Director of the Egyptian Institute of Art and Archaeology, noted that he was a “computer person,” and his lecture demonstrated his expertise in the use of technology.) He is on leave from that position during 2006-2007, holding the Dorothy K. Hohenberg Chair of Excellence in Art History at The University of Memphis. He has maintained since 1994 the Web site Egyptology Resources.


Four University of Memphis historians participate in symposium on 19th-century press, the Civil War, and free expression

Symposium participants [15 November 2006] Four historians from The University of Memphis recently participated in a panel at the Symposium on 19th Century Press, the Civil War and Free Expression sponsored by the West Chair of Excellence at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Titled “Researching the 19th Century from the New Millennia: A Focus on Primary Sources,” the panel was enthusiastically received with a request to return next year. Dr Charles W. Crawford, Professor and Director of the Oral History Research Office, presented “In Pursuit of Elusive Memories: Oral History and the Civil War.” Dr Doug Cupples, Instructor, presented “A Prism on the Past: Tennessee’s Civil War Questionnaires, A Note On Interpretation.” Dr Kent Moran, Center for Earthquake Research and Information, read “Bad News Travels Fast: The New Madrid Earthquake Account of John Clark Edwards,” and Mr Richard Nollan, early doctoral student, presented “Preservation and History: The Letters of Dr. William J. Armstrong, 1861-1878.”

Although the symposium is focused on journalism history, it is open to ancillary disciplines such as history, literature, and race and gender studies. The symposium has already resulted in one book, and three more are currently in preparation for the Purdue University Press. In addition to the paper presentations, symposium participants were treated to a tour of Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge Civil War battle sites by the Chickamauga National Military Park historian, Mr Jim Ogden.


Dr Kevin Martin speaks on “Piety as Non-Conformity: The ‘Holy Fool’ in the Ottoman Arab East” at Phi Alpha Theta meeting

[10 November 2006] Dr Kevin Martin, Assistant Professor, spoke today in the third program of a series of presentations on the theme “Counter-Culture in History” sponsored by Phi Alpha Theta, the history honorary. His topic was “Piety as Non-Conformity: The ‘Holy Fool’ in the Ottoman Arab East.”


Dr Robert Gudmestad and Dr Dennis Laumann nominated for Distinguished Teaching Award

[3 November 2006] Dr Robert Gudmestad, Assistant Professor, and Dr Dennis Laumann, Associate Professor, have been nominated for the current academic year’s Distinguished Teaching Award. Dr Laumann was nominated last year for the same award, and both were nominated last year for the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Excellence in Teaching award. Dr Laumann won the College of Arts and Sciences Excellence in Teaching Award last year.


Dr Daniel Unowsky speaks at Phi Alpha Theta pizza lunch on Fin de Siècle Vienna

[13 October 2006] Dr Daniel Unowsky, Associate Professor, spoke today at a Phi Alpha Theta pizza lunch on “Artistic and Intellectual Rebels in Fin de Siècle Vienna.” This was the second in a series of presentations sponsored by the history honorary on the theme “Counter-Culture in History.”


Many from Department of History participate in Tennessee Conference of Historians

[30 September 2006] The Department of History participated extensively in the Tennessee Conference of Historians held yesterday and today in Nashville. Tennessee State University was the host institution, and Dr Michael T. Bertrand of the Department of History, Geography, and Political Science was the contact person. Dr Bertrand received his Ph.D. in history from The University of Memphis in 1995, with a dissertation “Southern Youth in Dissent: Rock N’ Roll, Race, and Elvis Presley, 1945-1960” written under the direction of Dr Charles W. Crawford.

Participants from The University of Memphis included Dr Beverly Bond and Dr Charles Crawford, who chaired sessions; Dr Doug Cupples, who served as a commentator; Dr Margaret Caffrey, Dr Aram Goudsouzian, Horace Houston, Whitney Huey, Reggie Ellis, Le’Trice Donaldson, Yuan Gao, Dennis Paden, and Elton Weaver, who read papers. Participants who are alumni of our graduate program included Dr Brian Page, Dr Michael Bertrand, and Preston Hardy, who read papers and made presentations.


Dr James Fickle receives another grant and is appointed to board of forest history organization

[29 September 2006] Dr James Fickle has received a grant of over $48,000 to support his research on the southern hardwood industry. He has also been appointed to the board of the National Museum of Forest Service History in Missoula, Montana.


Dr Margaret Caffrey speaks on “Crossdressing Women in 19th-century America” at Phi Alpha Theta pizza luncheon

[22 September 2006] Dr Margaret Caffrey, Associate Professor, spoke today at the pizza lunch of Phi Alpha Theta on the topic “Crossdressing Women in 19th-century America.” This was the opening lecture in a series of presentations sponsored by Phi Alpha Theta, the history honorary, on the theme “Counter-Culture in History.”


Dr Aram Goudsouzian and Dr Guiomar Dueñas-Vargas participate in panel discussion on immigration policy

[20 September 2006] Dr Aram Goudsouzian and Dr Guiomar Dueñas-Vargas, both Assistant Professors, took part today in a panel discussion on U. S. immigration policy at a meeting of the Hispanic Student Association in the University Center. The third member of the panel was Ms Shannon Little, Instructor in the Department of Sociology.

ADDENDUM: [21 September 2006] Today’s issue of The Daily Helmsman reported on the event, but not entirely correctly. It had a photograph in which Dr Goudsouzian was erroneously identified as Dr Robert Gudmestad, and the caption further made two spelling errors in Dr Dueñas-Vargas’ name.


Ed Frank speaks on Special Collections Department/Mississippi Valley Collections

[20 September 2006] Edwin Frank, Curator, Special Collections Department/Mississippi Valley Collection of The University Libraries, spoke at noon today in McWherter Library on the strengths of the department, including the materials germane to the Mississippi Valley region of the nation including the City of Memphis, Tennessee; the Martin Luther King, Jr., Sanitation Strike Collection, World War II holdings, the newly-acquired Lawrence and Sarah J. Wynn Collection of Romantic and Victorian Literature, and other noteworthy collections of materials on historic persons and events.

Mr Frank received his M.A. degree in history from The University of Memphis in 1999. His thesis, “The Meriwethers of Memphis and St. Louis,” written under the direction of Dr David Tucker, used materials from Special Collections.


8th Annual Graduate Conference in African American History is held

[15 September 2006] Under the guidance of the Graduate Association for African American History, the 8th Annual Graduate Conference in African American History was held on the campus of The University of Memphis over a three-day period, 13-15 September.

Registration began at 3 pm on Wednesday, with an opening reception following, 5:30-6:30 pm, in the Wilson Gallery of the Holiday Inn. The highlight of the evening was the celebration dinner for the “Memphis State Eight” in the Grand Ballroom of the Holiday Inn, 7-9 pm. The “Memphis State Eight” were the African American students who led the struggle to desegregate what was then Memphis State University in September 1959. All eight had committed to being present for the celebration.

Various sessions began at 8:30 am Thursday and continued through Friday afternoon. Special sessions included the Memphis State Eight Public Forum, 1:45-3 pm on Thursday, the awards presentation, 12:30-1:30 pm on Friday, and the Hurricane Katrina Roundtable, 1:45-3 pm on Friday.

Dr John Dittmer delivered the keynote address, “Civil War Histories: Southern Community Studies and Their Critics,” at 7 pm on Thursday. Dr Dittmer is Professor Emeritus of History at DePauw University. His most recent book, Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi (1994), won the Bancroft Prize.

Department of History faculty members who presided over sessions or served as commentators were Drs Janann Sherman, Robert Gudmestad, Arwin Smallwood, James Fickle, Charles Crawford, Doug Cupples, and Beverly Bond. University of Memphis students Daryl A. Carter, Dianna Owens Fraley, and Ann Mulhearn contributed papers in the sessions.

Officers of GAAAH are Thomas C. Young, President; Darius Long-Young, Vice President; Laura Cunningham, Treasurer; Armanthia Duncan, Secretary; Shirletta Kinchen, Parliamentarian; Webb Matthews, Public Relations Coordinator; James Conway, Conference Secretary. The Faculty Advisor is Dr Arwin D. Smallwood.

In addition to GAAAH, the sponsors of the conference were Office of the President, President Shirley Raines; the Students Activities Council; the College of Arts and Sciences; the Department of History; The University of Memphis Foundation, Inc.; African and African American Studies; the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change; and the Graduate History Association.


Dr Doug Cupples has article selected for inclusion in forthcoming book

[12 September 2006] An article by Dr Doug Cupples, Instructor, “Virginia and Andrew Jackson’s Proclamation: The Emergence of an Opposition Party,” has been selected for inclusion in a forhcoming book, Words at War: The Civil War and American Journalism, to be published by Purdue University Press. Dr Cupples wrote the article for the Symposium on the 19th Century Press, the Civil War, and Free Expression, which is in its 14th year at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.


Dr James Fickle receives grant from the U.S. Forest Service

[8 September 2006] Dr James Fickle, Professor, has received a grant of approximately $45,000-50,000 from the U.S. Forest Service to support his research on the hardwood industry in the American South.


Dr Janann Sherman interviewed about book prices for article in the Commercial Appeal

[31 August 2006] Dr Janann Sherman, Olin Atkins Professor and Chair, was interviewed by Michael Lollar of the Commercial Appeal for an article about book prices which appeared in today’s issue of the newspaper.


Dr Dennis Laumann receives Excellence in Teaching Award from the College of Arts and Sciences

[23 August 2006] Dr Dennis Laumann, who has recently received tenure and promotion to Associate Professor, was given the Excellence in Teaching Award at this afternoon’s faculty meeting of the College of Arts and Sciences. The award carries with it a cash award and a plaque.


Three History faculty members receive Academic Enrichment Awards from the College of Arts and Sciences

[23 August 2006] It was announced at the meeting of the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences this afternoon that Academic Enrichment Awards have been made to three faculty members in the Department of History:

  • Dr Jonathan Judaken, for the Critical Race Studies Colloquium
  • Dr Beverly Bond, for the project Kwame Nkrumah and Ghanaian Independence, and the Impact of Ghanaian Independence on the American Civil Rights Movement
  • Dr Arwin Smallwod, for the 8th Annual African-American History Conference

Keith Sisson accepts position with the University College

[16 August 2006] Keith Sisson, doctoral candidate in the Department of History, has been appointed to a full-time position with the University College as an Online Instructor. His duties will include teaching courses in the Regents Online Degree Programs in world civilizations, American history, Hebrew and Greek Legacy, and Faith, Reason, and Imagination. He will also be involved in the development of new humanities courses as RODP continues to expand in response to increased demand and enrollment.


Mailyn Taylor receives administrative appointment with Memphis City Schools

[16 August 2006] Marilyn Taylor, doctoral candidate in the Department of History, has been appointed Social Studies Supervisor for Memphis City Schools.


Donovan travel funds awarded to four in the Department of History (also four previously unreported recipients from earlier semesters)

[14 August 2006] Dr Daniel Unowsky, Associate Professor, and graduate students Josh Gorman, Darius Long-Young, and Ed Hamelrath have each received $500 from the Donavan Travel Enrichment Fund for Fall 2006.

Mr Philip Donovan, a vice president with FTN Financial Capital Markets who earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration from The University of Memphis, initiated the fund in 2004 to help support faculty and students who are traveling to research centers, to conferences, or to study abroad. The fund is administered through the College of Arts and Sciences and awards are made each semester.

ADDENDUM: It has not been reported here previously that several others in the department received Donovan travel funds in earlier semesters: graduate students Chrystal Dykes, Colleen Harris, and Catherine Norvell in Spring 2006, and Dr Peter Brand, Assistant Professor, in Summer 2006.


Dr Dennis Laumann receives tenure and promotion to Associate Professor

[9 August 2006] Dr Dennis Laumann, currently Assistant Professor of History, has been granted tenure and has been promoted to Associate Professor, effective 1 September.


Dr Trygve Has-Ellison reports several presentations and publications

[9 August 2006] Dr Trygve Has-Ellison, who received his Ph.D. in history from The University of Memphis in 2004, reports from Texas that within the past year he has made several presentations at conferences, published one article, and had another article accepted for publication. His presentation on Emanuel Baron von Bodman at a conference in Sigmaringen, Germany, in October 2005 resulted in the publication of his article “The Noble as Nietzschian-inspired Artist: The Conceptual Work of Emanuel Freiherr von Bodman” in Peter Blickle, Mark Hengerer, Elmar L. Kuhn, eds., Adel im Wandel: Oberschwaben von der Frühen Neuzeit bis zur Gegenwart Band 2 (Ostfildern: 2006). In March 2006 he presented a paper on “Imperial Knights and Artistic Modernism in Fin-de-Siècle Munich” at the European Social Science Conference in Amsterdam.. In July he presented at Cambridge University, Magdalene College, for the conference Internationalism and the Arts: Anglo-European Cultural Exchange at the Fin-de-Siècle, on the topic of “German Nobles and the Reception of Artistic Modernism,” and at the conference Memory and the Uses of the Past at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, on the topic of “Modernism, Regionalism, and the Nobility: Fin-de-Sièich as locus of aristocratic memory.” A related article, “Nobles, Modernism, and Fin-de-Siècle Munich,” has been accepted for publication in German History.

Dr Has-Ellison is a Lecturer in European History at the University of Texas-Dallas. He also served recently as a sabbatical replacement at the University of Texas-Arlington for Dr Thomas Adam. His dissertation, written under the direction of of Dr Daniel Unowsky, was “’True Art is Always an Aristocratic Matter’: Nobles and the Fine Arts in Bavaria, 1890-1914.”

For more details and some personal observations, read his complete report on the departmental Web log.


Dr Peter Brand appears in documentary about Ramses’ Egyptian Empire on the History Channel

Brand in Egypt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[24 July 2006] Dr Peter Brand, Assistant Professor, appeared in a documentary television program this evening on the History Channel. The program was the third in a twelve-part series on “Lost Worlds” and was entitled “Ramses’ Egyptian Empire.”

One of the subjects was the construction of the temple at Karnak, one of Ramses’ numerous projects. The photograph from the History Channel shows Dr Brand (right) and Denys Stocks (left) discussing the construction methods used to build the huge columns of the temple.

Dr Brand is the director of the Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project and is continuing the work started there by Dr William J. Murnane, a member of our Department of History until his death in 2000. He is editing a festschrift in memory of Dr Murnane which will published by E. J. Brill. Awaiting publication, several of the contributions are available in PDF format at the Web site Causing His Name to Live: Studies in Egyptian Epigraphy and History in Memory of William J. Murnane.


Joe Frazer receives tenure-track appointment at Columbia State Community College

[9 July 2006] Joe Frazer, Teaching Assistant, has been appointed to a tenure-track position as Instructor at Columbia State Community College, where he will teach History 1110, 1120, 2010, 2020, and 2030. Mr Frazer is writing his dissertation in British history under the direction of Dr Robert Frankle, entitled “The Parliament of 1572: A Legislative History.”


Dr Doug Cupples’ photographs published in William Bearden’s book on blues musicians

[6 July 2006] Dr Doug Cupples, Instructor, has two of his photographs of blues musicians in Memphis Blues: Birthplace of a Music Tradition, written by William Bearden and published recently by Arcadia. One is a photograph of 108-year-old Nathan Beauregard at the 1968 Memphis Country Blues Fest. The other is of Bukka White performing in Overton Square. Both Beauregard and White were Delta Blues recording artists of the 1930s.


Dr Margaret Caffrey’s book on Margaret Mead published by Basic Books

Book cover[6 July 2006] Basic Books, a member of the Perseus Books Group, has just published Dr Margaret Caffrey’s To Cherish the Life of the World: Selected Letters of Margaret Mead, which she edited with Patricia Francis, the curator of an exhibition at the Library of Congress in 2002 entitled “Margaret Mead: Human Nature and the Power of Culture.”

The publisher has furnished the following description of the book:

Often far from home and loved ones, famed anthropologist Margaret Mead was a prolific letterwriter, always honing her writing skills and her ideas. To Cherish the Life of the World presents, for the first time, her personal and professional correspondence, which spanned sixty years. These letters lend insights into Mead’s relationships with interconnected circles of family, friends, and colleagues, and reveal her thoughts on the nature of these relationships. In these letters — drawn primarily from her papers at the Library of Congress — Mead ruminates on family, friendships, sexuality, marriage, children, and career. In midlife, at a low point, she wrote to a friend, “What I seem to need most is close, aware human relationships, which somehow reinstate my sense of myself, as no longer living ‘in the season of the narrow heart.’” This collection is structured around these relationships, which were so integral to Mead’s perspective on life. With a foreword by her daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson, a renowned author and anthropologist in her own right, this volume of letters from Mead to those who shared her life and work offers new insight into a rich and deeply complex mind.


Dr James McSwain promoted to rank of Professor at Tuskegee

[20 June 2006] Dr James McSwain (Ph.D. in history, The University of Memphis, 1986) has been promoted to the rank of Professor at Tuskegee University.

(See our earlier article about his also being named Research Teacher of the Year in the College of Liberal Arts and Education and receiving a fellowship from the Filson Historical Society.)


Dr Steven Patterson publishes article on soccer in the Jackson Sun

[15 June 2006] We recently called attention to Dr Steven Patterson’s article in Patterns of Prejudice. In a different vein, he wrote an article about how little regarded the game of soccer is in the United States, which appeared in the 11 June issue of the Jackson Sun. Noting that “America continues to issue a collective yawn towards the world’s most popular sporting event,” he considers several reasons why Americans don’t give the game much respect.


Dr Steven Patterson publishes article in Patterns of Prejudice

[1 June 2006] Dr Steven Patterson’s article “Postcards from the Raj” was published recently in Patterns of Prejudice 40, no. 2 (2006): 142-158. Dr Patterson received his Ph.D. in history from The University of Memphis in 2003. His dissertation, written under the direction of Dr Abraham Kriegel, was “Tin Gods on Wheels: Gentlemanly Honor and the Imperial Ideal in India.” He is now an Assistant Professor of History at Lambuth University.


Thomas Young receives scholarship from the National Society of Colonial Dames of America

[31 May 2006] Thomas Young, Teaching Assistant, has been awarded the National Patriotic Service Committee American History Scholarship by the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Tennessee. The award is made annually to an outstanding undergraduate or graduate student in the field of American colonial history. Mr Young received his B.S. and M.A. degrees from East Tennessee State University and is now in the doctoral program at The University of Memphis. His field of interest is the interaction between Europeans, Native Americans, and African slaves during the colonial period. He is the current president of the Graduate Association for African-American History.


Dr Guiomar Dueñas-Vargas leads panel on women, human rights, and peace in Costa Rica

[15 May 2006] Dr Guiomar Dueñas-Vargas, Assistant Professor, led a panel discussion this evening, “Women, Human Rights, and Peace in Costa Rica,” as part of the International Lecture Program sponsored by the Memphis In May International Festival.


History students receive degrees in historic University commencement

[6 May 2006] For the first time in its history, The University of Memphis held two commencement ceremonies in a single day. In a ceremony at 10 am in the FedEx Forum, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Communication and Fine Arts, the University College, and the School of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology conferred degrees. The speaker was Bruce Cole, Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The other colleges and schools conferred degrees later in the day, at 3 pm, also in the FedEx Forum.

John Bass, Richard Chandonnet, Lori Clanton, and Frances Wright received the M.A. degree in history.

History majors who received the B.A. degree were: David B. Allison, Jr., Jason Cryll Ball, Matthew Robert Benedetti, Samuel Leroy Chambers, Russell Allen Clayton, Allison Nicole Collier (member of Phi Alpha Theta, recipient of the Tennessee Historical Commission Award), Amy L. Crisler, Charles Eric Davidson, Joseph Matthew Downen, Amy Elizabeth Dudley, Sarah Elizabeth Froebrodt (member of Phi Alpha Theta), Lauren Michelle Goller, James Nicholas Goodman (member of Phi Alpha Theta), James Shannon Hays, Allison Renee Hipps, Donelson O. Howell, Olivia R. Hulsey, Mary Eleanor Jordan, Rhonda Crawford McCarty, Joseph Miller, Jr., Essence C. Morrow, Greg Alan Nemeth, Herwig Neumann, John Frederic Pabst (member of Phi Alpha Theta), Teneicesia V. Pittman, Angela Diane Price, Austin Lee Selby, and Matthew Roy Wagner.

Students graduating with a minor in history were: Christopher M. Beith, Kelly Michelle Burchfield, Timothy Neil Hurst, Laquica M. Mitchell, Ruth A. Nall, Brenda Kaye Parker-Boatright, Anna L. Pellett, Meredith Cooper Smith, Andrew Rodney Terrell, Sarah B. Tyler, Latonya L. Varnado, and Jessica M. Watson.


James Patrick Graves receives Marcus W. Orr Scholarship

[3 May 2006] James Patrick Graves has been awarded the Marcus W. Orr Scholarship in the Humanities for the 2006-2007 academic year. Mr Graves is a junior history major.


Dr James McSwain receives Filson Society Fellowship and is named Research Teacher of the Year at Tuskegee University

[29 April 2006] Dr James B. McSwain, who received his Ph.D. in history from The University of Memphis in 1986, has received a Filson Society Fellowship which will enable him to do research at the Filson Historical Society in Louisville, Kentucky. He has also been named as Research Teacher of the Year in the College of Liberal Arts and Education at Tuskegee University, where he is an associate professor of history.


Dr Kevin Martin speaks on Iraq for High School Scholars Seminar

[25 April 2006] In the final program of this academic year’s series this afternoon Dr Kevin Martin, Assistant Professor, spoke on “The Modern Nation of Iraq” for the High School Scholars Seminar.

The Seminar, coordinated by Dr Robert Gudmestad, Assistant Professor, Department of History, is intended primarily for high-school students in the Memphis area.


Whitney Huey receives University of Memphis Society fellowship award

Whitney and Robert Huey [23 April 2006] Whitney Huey, Teaching Assistant, received a check and a plaque for the University of Memphis Society Fellowship at the University Honors Assembly held this afternoon in the Michael D. Rose Theatre Lecture Hall. She is shown here with her father, Robert Huey, after receiving the award.

(See our earlier article for details about the award.)



Students win awards at Department of History Honors Gala

[22 April 2005] The Department of History held its first Honors Gala this afternoon from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm at the Alumni Center. (Previous awards ceremonies have been formal sit-down dinner parties, but the Honors Gala was a wine and hors d’oevres informal occasion.)

Dr Janann Sherman, Olin Atkins Professor and Chair of the Department, presided and made most of the awards. Dean Henry Kurtz of the College of Arts and Sciences, made a welcoming speech; Dr Robert J. Frankle, Associate Professor, presented the teaching awards; and Dr Olga Litvak, Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University, a specialist in modern Jewish history, spoke on “A Subject in Search of a Discipline: History and the Work of Interpretation.” Dr Dennis Laumann, Assistant Professor, and Becky Hodges, president of the Epsilon Nu chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, initiated the new members of Phi Alpha Theta, the history honorary society.

The following awards were made:

Major L. Wilson paper prize Undergraduate: Stephen C. Rogers, “The Levellers and Religious Toleration in an Age of Conflict”
Graduate: Frances Wright, “Mobility, Nationalism, and Womanhood: Public and Political Discourse on the National Service Act, Part II, in World War II Britain”
Tennessee Historical Commission Prize to History major graduating with the highest GPA Allison N. Collier
Ruth and Harry Woodbury Graduate Fellowship in Southern History Laura Cunningham
Belle McWilliams Scholarship in U. S. History Karla Castillo
Belle McWilliams Dissertation Fellowship Yuan Gao and Edward Hamelrath
Best Adjunct Instructor Vincent Clark
Best Graduate Student Teacher Carol Ciscel
Phi Alpha Theta initiates Undergraduates: Jefferson Brant, Allison Collier, Scott Healy, Cameron Higgs, Melissa Joy, Michael King, John Pabst, Shelley Wade
Graduates: Ken Baroff, Laura Cunningham, Timm Jobes, Webb Matthews

Dr Robert Frankle receives Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Excellence in Teaching Award at Convocation

Frankle [21 April 2006] At the Faculty Convocation held this afternoon in the Michael D. Rose Lecture Theatre, Dr Robert J. Frankle, Associate Professor, received one of the two awards made by the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation for excellence in teaching. JoAnne Tilley presented the award on behalf of the Foundation. (Photograph adapted from photograph in College of Arts and Sciences E-Files Newsletter)

The following citation was read during the ceremony:

“Bob has been the heart and soul of the teaching profession at the University of Memphis. He is an excellent classroom teacher and has been so recognized by his students, who were instrumental in making him a two-time Distinguished Teaching Award winner; by his peers, who have sought him out for team teaching in a number of different disciplines and colleges; and by administrators, who have used his expertise in producing innovative courses and modes of presentation. And students hang on his every word.”

(See our earlier article for details about the award.)


Department of History faculty members participate in Critical Race Studies conference

[21 April 2006] Several members of the faculty of the Department of History participated in “Naming Race, Naming Racism: The First Annual Conference of Critical Race Studies,” held yesterday and today at the National Civil Rights Museum and the Fogelman Executive Center. Drs Beverly Bond and Arwin Smallwood chaired presentations, and Dr Jonathan Judaken made the concluding remarks. All are Associate Professors of History.


Dr Olga Litvak speaks about Marc Chagall at Phi Alpha Theta lecture

[21 April 2006] Dr Olga Litvak, Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University, spoke this afternoon in Mitchell Hall auditorium on Marc Chagall and the question of Jewish self-identity. Dr Litvak is a specialist in Jewish history. The lecture was sponsored by Epsilon Nu chapter of Phi Alpha Theta.


Dr Jonathan Judaken has article published in Historical Reflections

[18 April 2006] Dr Jonathan Judaken, Associate Professor, has had published an article entitled “Alain Finkielkraut and the Nouveaux Philosophes: French-Jewish Intellectuals, The Afterlives of May ’68, and the Rebirth of the National Icon” in the journal Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques.


University uses picture of Dr Robert Frankle’s outdoor class on its home page

[17 April 2006] The University of Memphis shows campus scenes on its home page. The scenes are apparently chosen at random from what until recently was a rather small collection of images. Several new images now appear on the home page, including one of a class Dr Robert J. Frankle, Associate Professor, held on the lawn outside Mitchell Hall on a recent balmy day. Because the images on the University’s home page appear at random, you might see it right away or you might have to reload the page many times before it appears. To save you needless effort, here is the image:

Dr Frankle’s outdoor class


Dr Jonathan Judaken receives research fellowship from the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies

[12 April 2006] Dr Jonathan Judaken has received a Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies Fellowship for his research project, “Theorizing Antisemitism: Confronting Modernity and Modern Judeophobia.” He will be in residence at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington for the next academic year.


Whitney Huey wins University of Memphis Society fellowship

[12 April 2006]  Whitney Huey, Teaching Assistant, was reported yesterday as winning a second-place prize in the Student Research Forum. She also was awarded the prestigious University of Memphis Society, Inc., Graduate Fellowship given by the University and the Graduate School. The fellowship is awarded to only one doctoral student each year and carries with it a designation as a Fellow of the Society and $2,500.

Ms Huey will receive the check and a plaque at the Honors Assembly on Sunday, 23 April, at 3 pm in the Michael D. Rose Theatre Lecture Hall.


Whitney Huey wins second-place prize in Student Research Forum

Catherine of Siena[11 April 2006]  Whitney Huey, Teaching Assistant, won second place in the Graduate Liberal Arts/Fine Arts division of the 18th annual Student Research Forum held in the University Center today. Her prize-winning exhibit on Saint Catherine of Siena is now in the display case in the second-floor lobby of Mitchell Hall.

The image at the right, included in the exhibit, is of the dessicated reliquary head of Saint Catherine, which is in the Basilica of San Dominico in Siena.

Saint Catherine is remembered today chiefly for her mysticism, but Ms Huey is emphasizing her political thought in a dissertation under the direction of Dr James M. Blythe. Among Saint Catherine’s accomplishments was persuading the Pope to return the Papacy to Rome in 1377 after a long period of residence in Avignon. She is one of the three female Doctors of the Church (along with Saint Teresa of Ávila and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux) and the patron saint of Italy.

The Student Research Forum is sponsored by the Graduate School and the University Honors Program.


Tennessee History Day 2006 final competition held at The University of Memphis

[8 April 2006] The statewide final competition for Tennessee History Day in 2006 was held today at the FedEx Institute of Technology at The University of Memphis, under the sponsorship of the Department of History. Approximately 300 middle-school and high-school students, winners of Western, Middle, Eastern, and Southeastern Districts of Tennessee History Day competed for the honor of participating in National History Day at the University of Maryland-College Park in mid-June. The University’s president, Dr Shirley Raines, welcomed the participants and helped in making the awards to the winners.

The list of winners for Tennessee History Day 2006 is available on the Web site for Tennessee History Day.

Tennessee History Day is an affiliate of National History Day (NHD), a non-profit academic organization for elementary and secondary school students. History Day programming seeks to reform the typical approach used to teach and learn history in elementary and secondary schools by challenging students to create meaningful, well-researched historical projects as well as encouraging the development of research skills, analytical thinking, and creative expression. Students present their work in original papers, exhibits, performances and documentaries. These projects are entered into competitions at the local and regional levels. The winners of the regional competition come to The University of Memphis for the state competition.

Dr Jonathan Judaken, Associate Professor, is State Coordinator of Tennessee History Day.


Dr Janann Sherman accepted into Regents Academic Leadership Institute

[4 April 2006] Dr Janann Sherman, Olin Atkins Professor and Chair, Department of History, has been accepted into the Regents Academic Leadership Institute. The program, begun in 2005, cultivates and develops leadership in higher education across the state of Tennessee through the Tennessee Board of Regents. Participants gather about four times over the course of the year and engage in development seminars lasting three or four days that focus on enhancing various leadership skills and also enable the participants to become more familiar with the TBR system and policies. These meetings are supplemented with several online seminars and activities.


Dr Robert Gudmestad wins seat on University Council for Graduate Studies

[4 April 2006] The office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences announced today that Dr Robert Gudmestad, Assistant Professor, Department of History, has been elected to represent the Humanities departments of the college on the University Council for Graduate Studies. His term will run through 2009.


Dr Peter Brand comments on statues of Egyptian goddess Sekhmet for National Geographic

[31 March 2006] Dr Peter Brand, Assistant Professor, was quoted in a recent online article by National Geographic about the discovery by archaeologists working at the temple of Pharaoh Amenhotep III in Luxor, Egypt, of 17 statues of Sekhmet, an ancient Egyptian goddess with the head of a lion and the body of a woman. (Six more statues had been found at the site shortly before that latest discovery.) Various theories have been put forth as to why so many statues were found at the same site. About one theory that the statues may have been moved to the west bank of the Nile for a festival to honor the pharaoh, Dr Brand said: “Perhaps [Amenhotep] had created all these statues of different gods and brought them to his temple for a celebration and then dispersed them to other temples, where most of them have been found.” About another theory, that an epidemic may have been ravaging the region, Dr Brand said: “One possibility is that the king dedicated all the statues of this goddess in an effort to stave off the disease.” (Sekhmet was known both as a goddess of war and as a goddess of healing.)


Elton Weaver speaks about dissertation research at Phi Alpha Theta Research Forum

[31 March 2006] Elton Weaver, doctoral candidate, spoke this afternoon at the Second Annual Graduate Student Research Forum sponsored by Phi Alpha Theta. Mr Weaver’s dissertation is “Mark the Perfect Man, and Behold the Upright: Bishop C.H. Mason and the Emergence of the Church of God in Christ in Memphis, Tennessee,” and he presented some of the findings of his research. Mr Weaver has won several awards, including a grant from the Gilder Lehrman Institute in American History and the Southern Regional Education Board dissertation fellowship in 2005.


Several History faculty members participate in “Great Conversations”

[30 March 2006] The College of Arts and Sciences held its annual “Great Conversations” dinner this evening at the Holiday Inn at The University of Memphis. The dinners are held in order to bring community guests together with award-winning research and teaching faculty for an evening of dining and conversation.

Participating from the Department of History were Dr Peter Brand, Assistant Professor (Ask An Egyptologist); Dr Charles W. Crawford, Professor (“Politics and Poker”: Memphis Mayors since the Civil War); Dr Aram Goudsouzian, Assistant Professor (Sidney Poitier and the Politics of Image); Dr Robert Gudmestad (“Rollin’ on the River”: Life Inside a Mississippi River Steamboat); and Dr Joseph Hawes, Professor (“Over Here” While They Were “Over There”: The American Family during World War II).


Webb Matthews speaks on the career of basketball Hall of Famer John McLendon

[23 March 2006] In a session moderated by Dr Aram Goudsouzian, Assistant Professor, Webb Matthews, Teaching Assistant, spoke this afternoon on the career of John McLendon, a Hall of Fame basketball coach who achieved his greatest success at Tennessee State in Nashville. After studying at the University of Kansas under James Naismith, who invented the modern game of basketball, McLendon pioneered the up-tempo style of play which characterizes the sport today, and was the leader of the movement to integrate college basketball, winning the right for teams from the historically black institutions to compete in national championship tournaments. McLendon’s Tennessee State teams won the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) title three consecutive years in the 1950s, and their success forced the more prestigious National Collegiate Athletic Association to open its ranks to the historically black institutions and accept integration of the teams at its own member schools.

After Mr Matthews’ presentation, there was a question-and-answer session with guest panelists Jerry Johnson, who coached at LeMoyne-Owen for 46 years, and Richard Miller, who played and coached under McLendon. Both paid eloquent tribute to Coach McLendon, telling numerous stories about his personal life and coaching style, and expressing their opinions about recent developments in basketball.


History students and faculty figure prominently in Spring 2006 newsletter of African and African American Studies

[22 March 2006] African and African American Studies has just published the second issue of its twice-yearly newsletter Me te ase (Akan for: “What I hear, I understand”). As with the first issue, many of the articles are by or about persons in the Department of History at The University of Memphis. Dr Beverly Bond has a message in her capacity as Director of the program, summarizing events in African American History Month and Women’s History Month. Dr Dennis Laumann wrote about the upcoming 2006 Study Abroad in Ghana program. Sara D. Smith, graduate student, wrote “The Saddest Days: Hurricane Katrina’s Impact on New Orleans’ African American Communities.” Darius Young, graduate student, was one of the authors of a report on the origins and development of Black History Month, which included summaries of two lectures by visiting scholars during the recent Black History Month. One of these lectures was by Dr David Jackson, Jr. (Ph.D. in history, The University of Memphis, 1997) on Charles Banks, who was Booker T. Washington’s chief lieutenant in Mississippi politics (see our earlier article about this lecture). Dr Robert Gudmestad, Assistant Professor, who is teaching “Slavery in the Atlantic World,” the capstone course in African and African American Studies (AAAS4100), is featured in the article “Spring 2006 Course Offerings.”


Dr Robert Frankle receives Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Excellence in Teaching award

[21 March 2006] Dr Robert Frankle, Associate Professor, Department of History, has received one of two Excellence in Teaching awards made by the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation for 2005-06. Along with the other recipient, Dr. Lawrette Axley, Assistant Professor of Nursing, he will be recognized at the Faculty Convocation in April. The Foundation makes two awards of $5000 each year to recognize outstanding undergraduate teaching and an overall commitment to undergraduate education.

According to an announcement made by the University of Memphis Foundation, twenty-five persons received nominations for the awards, including two other members of the Department of History: Dr Robert Gudmestad and Dr Dennis Laumann, both Assistant Professors.

In addition to the Briggs award, during his teaching career Dr Frankle has won the University’s Distinguished Teaching Award two times.


Dr Doug Cupples has print selected for Memphis College of Art’s 70th Anniversary Alumni Exhibition

Brugge, Sint Janshopitaal [21 March 2006] The following is from a press release made by the Memphis College of Art, along with a Web version of his print supplied by Dr Cupples:

“Brugge, Sint Janshopitaal,” a silver gelatin print by University of Memphis History faculty Doug Cupples, has been selected by the juror, Cay Sophie Rabinowitz, for exhibition in the Memphis College of Art’s 70th Anniversary Alumni Exhibition. The selected piece is one of twenty-four selected for the College’s anniversary celebration. It is the signature work in a portfolio of images Doug made in Northern France and Brugges, Belgium, in 1969. St. John’s Hospital is one of the oldest surviving medieval hospitals in Europe. The chapel is the site of the famous 15th-century panels by Hans Memling.

Ms. Rabinowitz, the juror, is the American editor of Parkett Magazine, an esteemed publication that focuses on openings of important international artists. She is also Graduate Faculty at Parsons School of Art and Design, New York.

The Exhibition runs May 15 - July 23, 2006, at MCA’s new downtown gallery, 431 South Main Street. The opening reception is Friday, May 19, 2006, 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. Several activities are scheduled over the weekend for alumni and faculty.

Doug’s association with the school began as a high school student attending the Memphis Academy of Art’s Summer and Saturday program. After completing high school he enrolled in the Academy’s BFA program as a Fine Art/Painting major. While enrolled he studied with several of the Academy’s outstanding faculty among whom were Burton Callicott, Townsend Wolfe, Andrew Kincannon, Veda Reed, Martha Tuner, John McIntire and others. After three years at the Academy he transferred to then Memphis State University and applied the credit hours toward a minor in Art. Since then he continues to produce art works in various media.

Dr. Cupples is currently compiling a body of oral history interviews with local artists and art educators for archiving in the McWherter Library Special Collections. He plans to publish a book on the role of professional art training in the Memphis and Mid-South region along with articles on individual artists, the Brooks Museum of Art, The Dixon Gallery, and the Memphis College of Art.


Dr Peter Brand speaks on precocious pharaohs for Phi Alpha Theta meeting

[17 March 2006] Dr Peter Brand, Assistant Professor, Department of History, spoke today on “Precocious Pharaohs: Tutankamen and Other Child Kings of Ancient Egypt,” in a presentation to Phi Alpha Theta, Epsilon Nu chapter. Phi Alpha Theta meets monthly for a pizza luncheon and presentation and discussion about a historical topic. This was the fourth program on this year’s series theme, “Extraordinary Youth in History.”


Dr Arwin Smallwood serves as panelist for Black Graduate Students Association Town Hall

[15 March 2006] Dr Arwin Smallwood, Associate Professor, Department of History, served this evening on a panel for the Black Graduate Students Association Town Hall. The panel of black student leaders, faculty and staff, discussed black student leadership and its involvement with the campus and community, student attitudes toward learning and leadership, and black faculty and administration involvement with and responsibility for student leadership and attitudes.


Dr Gary Edwards awarded tenure-track position in history at Arkansas State University

[7 March 2006] Dr Gary T. Edwards, Instructor, Department of History, has accepted a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor in the Department of History, Arkansas State University. He is a specialist in 19th-century United States history, having received his Ph.D. from The University of Memphis in 2004. His dissertation, directed by Dr Charles W. Crawford, was entitled “Yeomen Families in a Slaveholders’ Democracy: Conflict, Community, and the Transition to Capitalism in Antebellum Southwestern Tennessee.”

Dr Edwards will be joining a department of 15 faculty on a campus at Jonesboro that enrolls 9,500 students; including its satellite campuses, Arkansas State has 16,000 students. He will be teaching Early Republic, Civil War/Reconstruction, American South, and State/Local (Arkansas), and expects in future years to teach Agricultural/Rural History and a graduate seminar in Heritage Studies (Public History).


Dr James Fickle appointed Visiting Professor at Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

[7 March 2006] Dr James E. Fickle, Professor, Department of History, has been appointed as Visiting Professor of Forest and Environmental History at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Dr Fickle will research and write a history of the school’s first century.

In announcing the appointment, Dean James Gustave Speth said, “We are exremely happy to have this relationship with Jim Fickle. The school has had a remarkable history and made sustained contributions over its lifetime. As the oldest school of forestry in the United States, its story is one that needs to be told. We look forward to working with Jim over the next few years on this project.”

Dr Fickle has written numerous articles and books on forest history and has won the Theodore C. Blegen Award of the Forest History Society for his work (see Dr Fickle’s biographical page).


Dr David Jackson, Jr., speaks on Booker T. Washington’s supporter, Charles Banks

[2 March 2006] Dr David Jackson, Jr., Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of History, Florida A&M University, spoke this afternoon on “The Chief Lieutenant of the Tuskegee Machine: Charles Banks of Mississippi.” Dr Jackson received his Ph.D. in history from The University of Memphis in 1997. His dissertation, written under the direction of Dr Kenneth Goings, was on Banks’ leadership in Mississippi, 1873-1915. He is co-editor of the Booker T. Washington Encyclopedia, and he recently published A Chief Lieutenant of the Tuskegee Machine: Charles Banks of Mississippi and co-edited Go Sound the Trumpet: Selections in Florida’s African American History, to which he contributed a chapter on Booker T. Washington (see our article about this book).

The lecture was sponsored by African and African American Studies, the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change, and the Graduate Association for African American History.


Drs Robert Frankle, Robert Gudmestad, and Dennis Laumann nominated for 2005-06 Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Excellence in Teaching award

[21 February 2006] Three members of the Department of History have been nominated for the 2005-06 Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Excellence in Teaching award: Dr Robert Frankle, Associate Professor; Dr Robert Gudmestad, Assistant Professor, and Dr Dennis Laumann, Assistant Professor. The Foundation makes two awards of $5000 each year to recognize outstanding undergraduate teaching and an overall commitment to undergraduate education. Recipients of the awards will be announced at Convocation in April.

Dr Laumann was recently nominated, along with Dr Doug Cupples, Instructor, for the University’s Distinguished Teaching Award (read our article about these nominations).


Ms Ann Mulhearn and Dr Aram Goudsouzian speak on natural disasters and American public policy

[13 February 2006] In the first program of this semester’s series this afternoon Ms Ann Mulhearn, Teaching Assistant, spoke on “The Great Flood of 1928 and (the Lack of) Public Policy” and Dr Aram Goudsouzian, Assistant Professor, spoke on “The Hurricane of 1938 and the New Deal” for the High School Scholars Seminar.

The Seminar, coordinated by Dr Robert Gudmestad, Assistant Professor, Department of History, is intended primarily for high-school students in the Memphis area.


Dr Charles Crawford appointed to task force on Mississippi River Natural and Recreation Corridor

[10 February 2006] Shelby County Mayor A. C. Wharton, Jr., has appointed Dr Charles W. Crawford, Professor, Department of History, to the Shelby County Task Force Committee for the Mississippi River Natural and Recreation Corridor planning effort.


University of Memphis team finds new tomb in Egyptian “Valley of the Kings”

[10 February 2006] An archaeological team from The University of Memphis, headed by Dr Otto Schaden, has found a tomb from the 18th Dynasty in the “Valley of the Kings” in Egypt, the first such discovery since Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun (KV62) in 1922. It has been designated as KV63, following the numbering system used by archaeologists of the region. According to a statement by Zahi Hawass, Head of the Supreme Council of Antiquities in Egypt, in the tomb were five mummies in five intact sarcophagi, together with 20 jars which had pharaonic seals. At a press conference today, Hawass said he believed the mummies were definitely persons related to the royal family. Although the area is called the “Valley of the Kings,” not all of the burial sites found there in the past have been those of royalty, and Dr Schaden jokingly said, “It could be the gardener,” but he added that it had to be someone who had the favor of the king. Because the tomb is a single chamber, it might be that some of the sarcophagi were not there originally but had been transferred there from other sites to thwart grave robbers.

The door to the chamber has only partially been removed at this point, allowing visual inspection and photographs of the objects within. Archaeologists plan to open the door fully within the next several days to allow them to enter. They hope to be able to remove the objects before the end of the digging season, which usually comes in May.

Roy Hopper photoDr Schaden is a research associate with the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology at The University of Memphis and Field Director of the Amenmesse Tomb Project (KV10), which has been engaged since the 1990s in the scientific excavation and conservation of the tomb of late-19th-Dynasty King Amenmesse. The new tomb was discovered during routine excavations being conducted by that project. In 2001 the team found the remains of workmen’s huts near the tomb of Amenmesse; more were discovered and excavated in later seasons, and during the current season the team uncovered and opened a shaft which led to the newly discovered tomb. Roy Hopper, Teaching Assistant, Department of History, participated in the KV10 project in 2001. Mr Hopper has written for the departmental blog a report, with many pictures, of his work during the 2001 season.

Mr Hopper furnished a photograph of those who make up the current team:

KV-10 team

Kneeling in front, with a hand on his shoulder: Earl Ertman (Associate Project Director). Others, from left to right: Ezzat Abo Bakr Saber, Inspector from the Supreme Council of Antiquities; Otto Schaden (Project Director); Edwin "Ted" Brock (Co-director of Field Work); Sharon Nichols (M.A. student from Institute of Egyptian Art and Archeology, The University of Memphis); Heather Alexander (photographer); Betty Schneider (artist/recorder); George Johnson (special photographer from KMT [Egyptology journal]); Roxanne Wilson (artist/recorder); Lorelei Corcoran (Director, Institute of Egyptian Art and Archeology, The University of Memphis).

[22 February 2006] ADDENDUM:  Although the original report was that five mummies had been found, an Egyptian news source reported today that eight mummies have been found in the tomb. On its newly created Web page, the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology mentions seven mummies.

[3 March 2006] ADDENDUM:  A Web site being maintained by Dr Otto Schaden reported that there are seven coffins and 27 jars in the tomb. The site has many photographs that do not appear to be available elsewhere.


Dr Doug Cupples speaks on “Shelby Foote: The South’s Homer”

[1 February 2006] Dr Doug Cupples, Instructor, Department of History, spoke today at the McWherter Library on Shelby Foote, who received public acclaim for his appearances in Ken Burn’s documentary on the Civil War, but whose primary reputation rests upon his monumental work, The Civil War: A Narrative, which occupied Foote from 1958 to 1974.


Oral History Research Office receives $120,000 grant for Veterans Oral History Project

[28 January 2006] The Assisi Foundation has awarded the Oral History Research Office, which is directed by Dr Charles W. Crawford, Professor of History, a grant of $120,000 to support the Veterans Oral History Project. The Office will be a Partner Archive for the Library of Congress’ Veterans History Project. Beginning with World War II, and ultimately addressing all American wars, the project will be interviewing veterans and civilians who actively supported war efforts (such as war industry workers, USO workers, and medical volunteers). The Office will provide permanent storage and preservation as well as free access to these materials in the Mississippi Valley Collection at the Ned McWherter Library and will share them with the Library of Congress, where they will be broadly accessible and permanently available to the public.


Elton Weaver receives grant from Gilder Lehrman Institute to support dissertation research

[27 January 2006] Elton Weaver, doctoral candidate in the Department of History, has received a grant from the Gilder Lehrman Institute in American History to support his research at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York.

Mr Weaver is finishing work on his dissertation entitled “Mark the Perfect Man, and Behold the Upright”: Bishop C.H. Mason and the Emergence of the Church of God in Christ in Memphis, Tennessee. Last year he received a dissertation fellowship from the Southern Regional Education Board to support his research (see our article in History happenings archive).


Dr Kevin Martin speaks on his research on the Damascus International Exposition, 1954-1958

[27 January 2006] Dr Kevin Martin, Assistant Professor, Department of History, spoke today on “Images of Syria’s Awakening: Bourgeois Industry, Leisure, Consumption, and Dreams at the Damascus International Exposition, 1954-1958.” This was the first in a series of occasional discussions of work in progress by History faculty or students.

Faculty members or graduate students who have papers that they would like to have discussed at a future meeting of the seminar should notify Dr Joseph Hawes, jhawes@memphis.edu.


Dr Stephen Stein has book on Navy pioneer Washington Irving Chambers accepted for publication

[23 January 2006] The University of Alabama Press has will publish a book about the man who has been called “one of the architects of the ‘New Navy,’” written by Dr Stephen Stein, Instructor, Department of History. Tentatively entitled From Torpedoes to Aviation: Washington Irving Chambers and Technological Innovation in the New Navy, it uses the life of Captain Washington Irving Chambers to examine technological change in the United States Navy from the 1870s to 1913. It includes such topics as naval strategy and education, battleships and the debates over all-big-gun battleships, and the first years of naval aviation. Among his other accomplishments, Captain Chambers arranged for the first take-off and landing of an airplane on a ship and directed the Navy’s aviation program from its creation in 1911 through 1913.


Becky Hodges and Tyler Stephenson present papers at Phi Alpha Theta national meeting

[13 January 2006] Becky Hodges and John Tyler Stephenson, both Graduate Assistants, Department of History, presented well-received papers at last week’s 2006 biennial convention of Phi Alpha Theta, History Honor Society, in Philadelphia. Ms Hodges’ paper was “Who’s Using Propaganda Now? Holocaust Denial in the Twenty-First Century” and Mr Stephenson’s was “The Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union: Struggle, Defeats, Accomplishment and a Pattern for Future Progress.”

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