Department of Political Science logo
Dr. Leah Windsor
set cell vertical height

Instructor of Political ScienceWindsor image

Phone:  901-678-2395
Fax:  901-678-2983
E-mail:  lcwells@memphis.edu
Office:  418 Clement Hall
   
CV  
Personal Web Page
 

 

Dr. Leah Windsor (MA '06) received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Mississippi in 2012. Her dissertation was on "The Political Consequences of Natural Disasters," with chapters examining sub-national contentious behavior, human rights, and leadership tenure. In 2012 she became a Faculty Affiliate with the Institute for Intelligent Systems at The University of Memphis, and she earned travel grants to attend the annual conferences for The Society for Political Methodology in Chapel Hill, NC as well as the American Political Science Association in New Orleans, LA. In 2013 she was invited to present a paper entitled "Autocratic Leaders and Natural Disasters" at the Visions in Methodology conference held at Florida State University. In June 2014 she was selected to receive a $1.3m grant award from the Minerva Initiative (Department of Defense). She serves as PI on this grant (summary below). Her co-authored article on climate migration with Dr. Nicole Detraz was recently published in International Feminist Journal of Politics.

 

Minerva Initiative Grant:

This project will continue work from a previous Minerva grant Modeling Discourse and Social Dynamics in Authoritarian Regimes (NSF #0904909) to analyze the speech of international actors to detect motives, identify threats, and find predictive patterns of language and behavior. This project has three components: identifying language patterns related to armed political crises; identifying bluffs and threats pertinent to both national and international security; and analyzing the relationship between language and contentious behavior like protests, riots, and rebellions. We want to extend our analysis beyond the existing corpora which focus heavily on China and the Middle East/North Africa regions to encompass Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, where there are growing security threats and ample opportunities to collect and analyze linguistic data.

Text Only | Print | Got a Question? Ask TOM | Contact Us | Memphis, TN 38152 | 901/678-2000 | Copyright 2014 University of Memphis | Important Notice | Last Updated: 
Last Updated: 8/14/14