Current Projects

Effects of age and training status on lower limb joint power contributions following a prolonged run. The purpose of this study is to compare lower limb joint angular powers runners of different age and of different training status before and after a prolonged run. (Dr. Paquette, collaboration: Dr. Paul DeVita; Dr. D.S. Blaise Williams, III)

The effects of plyometric training in different footwear on jumping performance. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of a 6-week plyometric training program among different footwear types on jump performance and lower limb joint power contributions in basketball players. (Ross Smith Thesis, Dr. Paquette)

Effects of a prolonged run and a 3-week running training program on lower extremity movement quality in novice runners. The purpose of this study is two-fold: 1) to observe the acute effects of completing a prolonged run on PTA and FMS scores; 2) to observe the effects of completing a three-week training cycle on PTA and FMS scores in novice runners. (Kris Camelio Thesis, Dr. Paquette).

How does prolonged running impact lower limb joint coupling angles in various runner populations? The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of completing a prolonged treadmill run on lower limb joint coupling angles in various runner populations. (Dr. Paquette, collaboration: Dr. Julia Freedman Silvernail)

Soreness-related changes in three-dimensional running biomechanics following eccentric knee extensor damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of knee extensor DOMS on 3D lower limb biomechanics during running following eccentric knee extensor muscle damage. (Dr. Paquette: funded by Bergstrom Nutrition)

Impact of a prolonged run on peak and cumulative knee joint contact forces in relation to weekly running volume. The purpose of this study is to assess if the completion of a prolonged submaximal run affects peak and cumulative knee joint contact forces in runners who run less or more per week. (Dr. Paquette, collaboration: Dr. Ross Miller).

Form-focused training on ground reaction force variables during running. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of form-focused group training on reducing impact magnitude during running. (Dr. Paquette, collaboration: Sam Blades)

A comparison of mechanical load and serum markers of cartilage degradation between obese and non-obese adults following exercise. The purpose of this study is to compare external mechanical loads and changes in serum COMP concentration during three submaximal bouts of exercise between obese middle-aged adults. A secondary purpose is to understand the relationship between lower extremity joint alignment and serum COMP in obese and non-obese adults. (Dr. Paquette, collaboration: Dr. Sarah Shultz; Dr. Peter McNair).

Injury-related biomechanical variables before and after a long run in trained male runners. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of completing a long run on known injury-related variables in trained male distance runners. (Dr. Paquette)

Effects of cross-training on running economy and biomechanical parameters in high school cross country runners. The purpose of this study is to compare physiological, biomechanical and performance measures in a high school cross country team before and after 4 weeks of different cross-training modalities. (Dr. Paquette, collaboration: Mark Temme)

Walking with a forefoot strike to reduce head impacts: Implications for traumatic brain injury rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to assess head impacts using an accelerometer during walking with a forefoot and rearfoot strike pattern. (Dr. Paquette & Dr. Powell, collaboration: Dr. Nick Murray)

The effects of a simulated pitching outing on knee joint kinetics in collegiate baseball pitchers. The purpose of study is to examine whether knee joint kinetics of the stride knee in baseball pitchers change throughout a simulated pitching outing. (Shelby Peel Thesis, Dr. Paquette).

Effects of multi-component exercise training with specific visual training on fall prevention in older adults at a high-risk of falling. The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of two 6-week multi-component exercise interventions with either added visual balance training with response stepping or visual balance only training on risk of falling in older adults at a high risk of falling. (Dr. Paquette/Dr. Li).

Recovery of postural stability, gait biomechanics and lower extremity function following arthroplasty. The purpose of this study is to quantify improvements in muscle activation, postural control, gait biomechanics and symmetry, and to identify efficacious exercise interventions for neuromuscular rehabilitation and re-integration following total ankle arthroplasty. (Dr. Powell, Collaborator: Dr. Robin M. Queen)

Effect of interventions on lower extremity stiffness and biomechanics during running. This study seeks to identify interventions that can be implemented to alter lower extremity stiffness and joint biomechanics to improve performance and/or reduce the risk of injury during running activities. These interventions include changing strike patterns, stretching, resistance training and in-shoe orthotics among others. (Dr. Powell, Collaborators: Drs. D.S. Blaise Williams & Cris Stickley)

Aged-related changes in lower extremity running biomechanics. The purpose of this study is to identify reversible and irreversible changes in lower extremity structure and running biomechanics in response to aging and running interventions. (Dr. Powell, Collaborator: Drs. D.S. Blaise Williams & Cris Stickley)

Effects of dopaminergic medication on reflex amplitude and muscle-tendon unit stiffness in individuals with Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the changing contributions to neural and non-neural mechanisms underlying improved movement and reduced rigidity following administration of dopaminergic medication. (Dr. Powell, Collaborator: Dr. Rui-Ping Xia)

Biomechanics of gait and posture in individuals with Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study is to quantify gait biomechanics and postural control in individuals with PD as well as determining the efficacy of therapeutic interventions (exercise and pharmacological) in improving symptoms of PD (rigidity, hypokinesia, fatigue). (Dr. Powell, Collaborators: Drs. V.N. Pradeep Ambati, Rebecca Reed-Jones & Rui-Ping Xia)

Changes in turning synergies in response to dopaminergic medication in individuals with Parkinson's disease. Previous research has identified that while healthy adults perform a walking turn with a descending segmental coordination (eyes then head, then trunk, then pelvis), individuals with Parkinson's disease perform walking turns with an "en bloc" turning strategy or as a single segment (all at once). The purpose of this study is to assess changes in the "en bloc" turning synergy associated with Parkinson's disease in response to dopaminergic medication. (Dr. Powell, Collaborators: Drs. V.N. Pradeep Ambati, Rebecca Reed-Jones)

Oculomotor control in sport-related concussion and recovery. This study seeks to identify unique characteristics of oculomotor control following a sport-related concussion and to determine the efficacy of tracking oculomotor function as a method to track recovery from sport-related concussion. (Dr. Powell, Collaborators: Drs. Nic Murray & Rebecca Reed-Jones)

Structural and Performance Variables Associated with Vertical Jump. The purpose of this study is to further identify the applicable predictors of vertical jump by simultaneously analyzing various combinations of performance and structural measures in addition to body fat percentage, body weight (BW) and height. (Lindsey Allison Thesis, Dr. Weiss,).