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University of Memphis Photo
2010 - 2011 Photo Contest

2011 Photo Contest

The University of Memphis’ Study Abroad Program presented an International Photo Contest exhibit November 2011. The photos were taken by University of Memphis students while studying abroad during the 2010-2011 academic year.  Each of the 26 contest entries are listed below, along with the descriptions provided by their respective photographers.

First Place: New Year's Eve in China
by Vendula Strnadova
Wuhan, China
First Place:  New Year's Eve in China The year 2011 began on the streets of Wuhan, China, putting together lanterns with people I met just a few moments earlier. The point of the lanterns was to write a wish for the New Year, and then light the bottom to let it float away. Despite a huge language barrier, these kids explained the process and helped us for over 20 minutes to make sure our new year started off right.

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Second Place: My First Mosque
by Jenny Mitchell
Istanbul, Turkey
Second Place:  My First Mosque I have never truly experienced any form of the Islamic religion besides simply meeting Muslims. While in Turkey, I was able to absorb so much and completely be in an Islamic culture: hearing prayer calls, covering my hair, etc. The utter size and intricate beauty of each mosque was overwhelming.

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Third Place: Prayers to Our Lady of Hope
by Cheyenne Medlock
Ephesus, Turkey
Third Place:  Prayers to Our Lady of Hope This photo represents the essence of hope in a higher power and demonstrates that wherever you are, you are not alone. This is what I felt when visiting the House of Mary in Ephesus, Turkey and saw the tiny prayers left by those who had visited before me.

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Special Mention: La Rendicion del Toro
by Michayela Rosario
Salamanca, Spain
Special Mention:  La Rendicion del Toro This photo captures the ending moment of a bull fight. It was the most surreal moment of my trip where my American-bred views and my newly found Spanish culture created an imbalance of emotion. The crowd was roaring with pride, and I was filled with sorrow. I feel this picture captures those emotions beautifully.

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Los Indignados
by Janelle Arguijo
Madrid, Spain
Los Indignados During my visit to Spain, there were a group of protestors who called themselves "Los Indignados." The man in this picture is one of the organizers leaving a tent which had boards with the count of all of the signatures they had collected to help fight the government against unemployment and low wages.

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Pride in nationality doesn't always transfer across cultures
by Chelsea Boozer
Wiesbaden, Germany
Pride in nationality doesn't always transfer across cultures The conversation to follow this photo at the departure ceremony of American troops from Wiesbaden, Germany lingers in my mind. I sang the two countries' national anthems and bowed my head in prayer without hesitation, but my German classmate was upset by American pride. He explained it's not that way with Germans whose military is defined by their role in WWII. If you're proud to be German, you're a Nazi.
In this photo: (left) Moritz Kluthe, Johannes Gutenberg Universitat Mainz; (right) Hannah Gray, The University of Memphis

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Menos Botellon, Mas Revolucion
by Stacy Brewer
Madrid, Spain
Menos Botellon, Mas Revolucion This picture depicts the M-12 Movement, in Madrid, during the 2011 Spanish elections. Banners throughout the plaza illustrate people's frustrations with the economy: Menos botellon, mas revolucion (It's not a botellon, it's a revolution). We spent many nights meeting the locals and discussing the global and national recession. This experience opened my eyes to the unanimity of people worldwide and is proof that a unified voice will be heard.

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Companionship and Chores
by Manica Buenaventura
Murcia, Spain
Companionship and Chores Although my Italian roommate, Alice, my German roommate, Irina, and I would have days of language barriers, we always found ways to bond even if it was through doing simple things together in our flat. Whoever thought that the deprivation of a dryer could build a beautiful, diverse friendship among three completely different strangers?

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Multicultural Musicians
by Megan Carolan
Mittenwald, Germany
Multicultural Musicians What originally was a rest stop on the University Singers tour became the highlight of the trip. We witnessed the villages of Mittenwald, Germany celebrating the end of winter. This picture shows how common appreciation for music brought together University Signers (to the left) and Germany musicians (to the right).

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Last Time
by Noelle Cross
Brugge, Belgium
Last Time We sat in silence for a long time, watching Brugge hustle by. Six months ago we had been complete strangers, coming from different countries, and different cultures. Yet, by the time the photo was taken, we had become best friends. We spent that afternoon mourning the end of our experience. Even though this was our last time here; it would not be our last time together.

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Pura Vida
by Jessica Devers
Costa Rica
Pura Vida Here is a friend I made in Costa Rica showing me how to correctly eat the popular, exotic fruit called mamon chino. Despite my first concerns because of its scary, threatening appearance, I tried what she handed me and found it quite tasty. Whether it pertains to people or experiences, if you just be open-minded, you'll come to appreciate and enjoy things in life you'd otherwise miss the chance to discover.

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Being Thankful for the Small Things
by Marsheka Dunn
Argentina
Being Thankful for the Small Things As Thanksgiving approached, I was sad to not be celebrating the holiday with family; however, as I sat down and ate with these people in the photograph, I realized that I was celebrating it with family, and that was a lot to be thankful for.

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Family
by Gian Gozum
Shanghai, China
Family A friend of mine living with a family during his study abroad invited my friends and I to dinner at this host family's house. After just a month in Shanghai, I was able to talk with his family about differences in American and Chinese culture, the Chinese economy, and travel destinations in China--all in Chinese! These discussions, along with the traditional Chinese cuisine, made this evening one of my best memories in China.

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Painted Streets
by Lauren Hay
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Painted Streets This picture was taken from a sidewalk overpass that led from a resort to the beach. Amongst tourism, this community remains to ground itself through artwork that portrays the native culture. Many locals thrive off of this creativity. I'll always remember their eagerness to share their culture with us, and I'll always feel welcomed in their community.

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Little Warriors
by Dania Helou
Istanbul, Turkey
Little Warriors We were running around this massive fort/dungeon, climbing high and low and peering over the edge, watching the city we had been dreaming of. During the time it was pretty cold, so when our tour guide told us about the horrifying Ottoman Dungeon, it gave us a pretty vivid image of what it was like!

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Game Day
by Evan Juraschka
Florence, Italy
Game Day One afternoon before the game, we were at the bus stop and my roommate began communicating as well as he could to this older Italian about the football team. Noticing we were American, he was interested in our enthusiasm. Throughout our time we became fans of the local football team and some locals recognized that, and would cheer on game day, as we walked down the streets.

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Kulturtag
by Kaitlynn Lee
Eichstaett, Germany
Kulturtag This photo was taken during a weeklong festival called "Kulturtag." Translated it means "Culture Day." There was dancing, food, and beer, of course. This is a friend who was brave enough to get up and learn the dance from one of the best people in the world to learn from.

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Tradition in Modern Society
by Megan Long
Takayama, Japan
Tradition in Modern Society We went fishing in a rural area of Japan. I was so used to the big city that I didn't see the countryside often. The fish would be fire-cooked and eaten, with the head still attached. This man was making the fire. I was surprised that Japan still appreciates simplicity.

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9 Days of Exceptional Cultural Milieu in Auvillar, France
by Feliz Anne R. Macahis
Auvillar, France
9 Days of Exceptional Cultural Milieu in Auvillar, France Participant composers from London, Argentina, Brazil, Taiwan, Hongkong, U.S.A. and the Philippines gathered to share and talk about their music on master classes and lessons chaired by guest composers. This picture displays one of the highlights of the Etchings Festival--to have the population of Auvillar experience and relish the diversity of our music being performed over the course of three concerts.

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Ole!
by August Pacente
Salamanca, Spain
Ole! This photo is from a bull fight in Salamanca, Spain. Bull fights have been a large part of Spanish culture for centuries. This photo was taken during the intro of the bull fighters.

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Gaufres: The taste of Belgium.
by Sarah Piazza
Gent, Belgium
Gaufres: The taste of Belgium. Traveling excites many people, for various reasons, but in my opinion, nothing can expertly explain a region better than its food. I ventured to Gent, Belgium where I had the privilege to enjoy fresh, warm waffles, loaded with juicy strawberries, homemade whipped cream and a decadent chocolate sauce. Experiencing the taste of the Flanders region for the first time was an experience my taste buds will not soon forget.

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Bull vs. the Matador
by Alice Postell
Salamanca, Spain
Bull vs. the Matador Bullfighting was promoted by the Spanish government as a national symbol. Bullfighting was also practiced in Portugal, Southern France and some Latin American countries. The art and history of bullfighting in the world is a popular custom and tradition known to many, but only seen by few. Bullfighting is not just a tradition or custom, but it's a sport and entertainment throughout the world.

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Mas Cacao Por Favor
by Ashley Randall
Bambu, Costa Rica
Mas Cacao Por Favor Enter the village of Bambu and you'll find the Bribri tribe--a peaceful, self-sustaining group of native Costa Ricans who know every nutritional benefit of any local plant or food, even chocolate! Here, "Paper Tico" demonstrates the process of hand-crafting fresh, antioxidant-rich chocolate. Your Hershey's bar wouldn't compare!

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Dignita
by Lauren Reed
Florence, Italy
Dignita One afternoon my roommate and I were out exploring the city. I was looking for things to photograph for my photojournalism project when we encountered thousands of protestors. Men and women of all ages came out to express their disgust with the actions of their Prime Minister, Silvio Berluscani. This picture is of protesters who spell out "Dignita," which translated from Italian means Dignity.

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Salamanca Courtyard
by Lindsey Steffenhagen
Salamanca, Spain
Salamanca Courtyard This picture is a view of what I walked past everyday on the way to school. I took it from the steps of the cathedral. It represents all the new and beautiful things I got to see and experience while studying abroad in Spain this summer.

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The Home of Golf
by Jacob Turner
St. Andrews, Scotland
The Home of Golf St. Andrews is known as the home and birthplace of golf going back to around 1400 AD. The links style course is considerably different than the typical American course with its pot bunkers, thick, rough, and double greens. Unfortunately, I became very familiar with the tall rough and pot bunkers!
* Photo taken by the applicant.

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