Wish You Were Here
University of Memphis Photo
2010 - 2011 Photo Contest

2012 Photo Contest

The University of Memphis’ Study Abroad Program presented an International Photo Contest exhibit in November 2012. The photos were taken by University of Memphis students while studying abroad during the 2011-2012 academic year.  Each of the 14 contest entries are listed below, along with the descriptions provided by their respective photographers.

First Place: ¡Vamos España!
by Kristen Cooper
Salamanca, Spain
First Place:  ¡Vamos España! We traded in our Tiger Blue for ROJO and gathering in the Plaza Mayor to watch team Spain compete for the Eurocup. We learned that fútbol is a way of life in Spain and celebrations after wins lasted all night. A highlight of the trip was seeing Spain crowned Eurocup champions.

See a larger version
 

Second Place: You’ll meet me here, then I’ll meet you there
by Derek Eckert
Wiesbaden, Germany
Second Place:  You’ll meet me here, then I’ll meet you there I met Daniel, a German, during his Study Abroad in Memphis, my hometown. It was only fitting that during my Study Abroad I took the opportunity to visit him in Wiesbaden, his hometown. Furthering our moment of cross-culture, we ate American cuisine in Germany, better known as Mexican food in the United States.

See a larger version
 

Third Place: Incense
by Kate Rachiele
Kyoto, Japan
Third Place:  Incense Kyoto is a city filled with temples, memorials, and shrines – visiting them and paying respect is an integral part of Japanese life. This image of burning incense not only depicts the offering I made at the Ryózen Kannon, it represents all of my experiences participating in Japan’s Buddhist and Shinto rituals.

See a larger version
 

A Blend of Flavors
by Aaron Baggett
Montevideo, Uruguay
A Blend of Flavors The most common way to partake in the Uruguayan culture to is meet up with friends and socialize while drinking their exotic tea called “Yerba Mate.” Not only did this tea help me to socialize and adapt to the culture, but I found myself among a variety of cultures. After classes many exchange students and Uruguayan students would meet up and drink coffee, tea, and Yerba Mate on my roof. We were literally a blend of flavors.

See a larger version
 

The Summer Yukata
by Alex Payton
Kyoto, Japan
The Summer Yukata This is my girlfriend and I at her house in Kyoto, Japan. The robes were handmade by her grandmother, and given to us by her family as a gift. This meant that I was not only accepted, but also honored to be welcome in their home.

See a larger version
 

Untitled
by Ben Rees
Tangier, Morocco
Untitled Alone navigating narrow streets, nerves still shaking from hours before having been spat on and threated to be beaten up, I held my camera with one hand while the other stayed in my pocket to keep from being picked, when I captured the hawking-gaze of this man reaffirming my fears.

See a larger version
 

The Musician
by Breya Walker
Bologna, Italy
The Musician Federico Berti is the name of the man in the photo. This form of music has to be passed down from generation to generation, and it could not be learned in school, but is taught by someone who plays. I found that out by asking him, in Italian, what type of music he played. This was important to me because I have always heard this type of music (i.e. in movies), but never knew the history or background of where it originated. Afterwards, he played me an additional three songs and I bought his CD.

See a larger version
 

Old and New
by Carolyn Asselin
Tokyo, Japan
Old and New This photo captures the moment I realized that I was actually in Tokyo, and how much the traditional culture fit into the face paced modern world of Japan. As everybody, including myself, ran to catch the train, still two women walked proudly through the station in their kimonos.

See a larger version
 

Maori Native Dance
by Johna Likins
Taupo, New Zealand
Maori Native Dance This photo was taken during a Maori Native ceremony. It is important because it helps to express the culture of the native Maori people of New Zealand. I was feeling a strong connection to the Maori people and was also learning about their unique dancing and musical styles. The culture of the Maori is rich and so full of life. You can almost feel the energy coming from the people in this photo.

See a larger version
 

An American Perspective
by Kaylee Willis
London, England
An American Perspective Before I traveled to London I believed that the city thrived behind saying “Long Live the Queen.” That is anything but true. The city is full of multiculturalism and independence. I feel this proves that to truly understand the world one must lose the “American Perspective” and see beyond the stereotypes.

See a larger version
 

International Relations
by Mai Orsino
Salvador, Brazil
International Relations Yes, that’s me helping to strengthen U.S. - Brazil diplomatic relations – preluding Dilma Rouseff’s meeting with President Obama later April 2012! Although this is not the case, this photo means more to me than an ideal college student spring break trip. On the final full day in Brazil, this photo captured my week’s experience abroad in a single shot. Due to my Asian* characteristics, I was constantly mistaken as a Brazilian all week which but this made making friends easier in spite of the language barrier. This explains how I met this dashing young fellow outside the Mercado Modelo! Interestingly, our conversation began in Portuguese, touched on Spanish for a bit, and ended in English when I came clean as an American. He made me a ‘presente’ –a word I learned from a hippie lady I met in the market earlier that week– before I left and promised to friend me on Facebook. *Brazil is home to the highest concentration of Japanese outside of Japan.

See a larger version
 

The Prayers of Others
by Rebekah Wineman
Antwerp, Belgium
The Prayers of Others The candles in this photo represent prayers in Catholicism. As I lit my own candle and kneeled in the pews to gather my thoughts, I saw others to do the same. No one was allowed to speak in the church, but all who were respectful were allowed to pray or learn regardless of background or where they were from. Our silent communication through our actions made me feel connected to the people around me, not through religion, but through our thoughts to help others. That moment made me realize that even people from different cultures can communicate wordlessly and show each other respect among humans.

See a larger version
 

Legacy
by Susannah Acuff
Bushenyi District, Uganda
Legacy Kyakabeizi villagers, including this Nyabo (Madam), were some of the first enrollees in Ishaka Health Plan (IHP). IHP is a community-based health insurance program in southwestern Uganda. The lady pictured here, in her home, was able to put her orphaned grandson through school and provide him with health care due to the money she saved through IHP. She suffered from Asthma and could barely speak. Instead, she shook her hands at me and whispered “webare,” the Runyankole word meaning “thank you.” I later learned that her hand-shaking in the air is a cultural gesture indicating enjoyment and happiness.

See a larger version
 

Spirit in the Air
by Joseph Poplawski
Nagoya, Japan
Spirit in the Air As my year in Japan was coming to an end, two of my Japanese friends took me to the Nagoya’s Summer Festival. The moment we go off the subway and into the streets there were millions of Japanese people and traditional Japanese foods, games, and trinket stands that went on for miles! You could feel the Japanese spirit in the air; it floated by in the delicious scents of the food, in the power of the fireworks erupting above our heads, in the hardy drumbeats of the floats going by, in the vast array of colors on every stand, float, and was even represented in the Japanese clothing. This experience will be with me for the rest of my life!

See a larger version
 






Text Only | Print | Got a Question? Ask TOM | Contact Us | Memphis, TN 38152 | 901/678-2000 | Copyright 2014 University of Memphis | Important Notice | Last Updated: 
Last Updated: 11/15/12