Graduate Catalog
English

ERIC CARL LINK, PhD  
Chair
Room 467, Patterson Hall
(901) 678-2651

JEFFREY SCRABA, PhD
Coordinator of Graduate Studies
(901) 678-4768

E-mail: jscraba@memphis.edu
www.memphis.edu/english

I. The Department of English offers programs of study leading to the Master of Arts degree, the Master of Fine Arts degree, and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Entering students will consult with a departmental advisor to plan their course of study. Students in the MA program will choose one concentration from the five offered: Composition Studies, Language and Linguistics, Literature, Professional Writing, or English as a Second Language. Students in the PhD program will choose one of four concentrations: Composition Studies, Professional Writing, Applied Linguistics, or Literary and Cultural Studies.

Program objectives are: (1) development of skills to engage in original research or original creative writing for publication or for positions in education or industry; (2) development of advanced competencies in teaching language or literature and presentation of works to others; and (3) understanding and contributing to contemporary issues and debates in the chosen concentration.

 All graduate students must comply with the general requirements of the Graduate School (see Admissions Regulations, Academic Regulations, and Minimum Degree Requirements) as well as the program requirements of the degree being pursued.

PPI STATEMENT
All college transcripts and test score information should be sent directly to Graduate Admissions. Beginning with Summer and Fall 2013 admittance, the Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts, and Doctoral programs in the Department of English require the ETS® Personal Potential Index (PPI) Evaluation Report containing a minimum of three (3) evaluations from separate evaluators in order to consider your application complete. The PPI is a third-party evaluative tool administered by the ETS (Educational Testing Service) organization. There is no fee to submit the PPI report to the University of Memphis.

You can create an ETS PPI account and review the ETS PPI Information Bulletin, which explains the service, at http://www.ets.org/ppi/applicants/start/.

PPI - Steps At A Glance

  • Create an ETS PPI account to begin the process.
  • Provide contact information for the evaluators you would like to complete an ETS PPI evaluation.
  • ETS sends an email to each evaluator inviting them to access the ETS PPI system and complete your evaluation.
  • Each evaluator logs in to the ETS PPI system to rate you on six personal attributes and provide an overall evaluation. Evaluators also may provide optional comments for each attribute as well as for the overall rating.
  • You are notified via e-mail when each time that one of your evaluators completes their PPI.
  • **THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP** After all of your evaluators have completed their PPI reports, you must log back into your PPI account, designate the University of Memphis Office of Graduate Admissions to receive an ETS PPI Evaluation Report and select the evaluations that are to be included in the report. Our office cannot access your PPI recommendations until you complete this step.
  • Once you designate the University of Memphis to receive an ETS PPI Evaluation Report, ETS creates an evaluation report and sends it electronically to the University of Memphis, Office of Graduate Admissions. Allow up to 5 days for the report to be processed and sent to the University of Memphis. View a sample PPI Report.

The evaluators/faculty members who you choose should be individuals that you believe are best able to objectively comment on your intellectual and professional achievements and potential.

We may call or write your recommenders for more information.

II. MA in English Degree Program

A. Admission

  1. An overall minimum grade point average of 3.00 at the undergraduate level is expected.
  2. A competitive score on the Graduate Record Examination.
  3. An official undergraduate and if applicable graduate transcript to Graduate Admissions.

B. Program Prerequisites

An undergraduate degree with a major in English. A student who does not have an undergraduate major in English or appropriate background may be required to complete a maximum of 12 upper division hours in English with a grade of B or higher in each course.

C. Program Requirements

  1. a. Students in Literature, ESL, or Linguistics must complete a total of thirty (30) semester hours of course work plus a three-hour thesis, or a total of thirty-three (33) semester hours of course work. All students must complete a four-hour comprehensive written examination.
    b. Students in Professional Writing must complete a required four-hour comprehensive exam and produce either a thesis or project or portfolio. The exam must be passed before the student can register for thesis hours.
  2. Students in ESL, Linguistics, Professional Writing and Composition Studies must complete two graduate courses (six semester hours) outside their area of concentration.
  3. Students must complete the following minimum course work, beyond the requirement in section 2, in at least one of these concentrations:
    1. Composition Studies—18 hours;
      1. MA students pursuing an emphasis in Composition Studies must complete a 9-hour core consisting of ENGL 7/8003, 7/8801, and 7/8822.
    2. Language and Linguistics—18 hours including ENGL 7511 or equivalent graduate or undergraduate introduction to linguistics approved by student's advisor;
    3. Professional Writing—18 hours
      1. The Professional Writing concentration requires a 3-hour thesis, project, or portfolio.
      2. Professional Writing students will complete their 18 hours as follows: 7805, 7806 and 7809, and three courses selected from the following: 6618, 6619, 7013, 7014, 7807, 7808, 7816, and 7818.
    4. Literature—18 hours, including 7000 (excluding 7100); Students must take at least one literature course from before 1800 and one literature course from after 1800, and at least one Literary Theory class, which may be chosen from any designated theory class, including 7/8477, 7/8478, 7/8701, 7/8702, and 7/8480. All students must take a four-hour written comprehensive examination. Literature students should take ENGL 7000 in the first year of graduate study.
    5. English as a Second Language—18 hours, including ENGL 7531.

NOTE: Courses numbered 7004, 7005, 7006, 7812, and 7813 require approval of the Chair of the Department and Coordinator of Graduate Studies in order to be applied toward any concentration.

  1. Students in Composition Studies will take a written comprehensive exam and complete either a thesis or professional portfolio. Students should contact the English Graduate Office for examination format and dates.
  2. Reading knowledge of a foreign language for students in Literature and Linguistics. Proficiency may be demonstrated in a variety of ways (inquire in English Graduate Office for options). Students intending to pursue a PhD are advised to develop a reading competency in at least one of the following: French, German, Latin, or Greek.
  3. Thesis (ENGL 7996) Optional, except for the concentration in Professional Writing.
    NOTE: Students electing to write a thesis should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
  4. An average of 3.00 in all graduate English courses.
  5. Each graduate teaching assistant in the Department of English must enroll in English 7003-8003 before or concurrent with first teaching assignment.

D. Retention Requirements

Students who are on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Upon entering the MA program, a student chooses an advisor in his or her concentration. The advisor will monitor the student's progress toward completion of the degree. Each semester the Graduate Studies Committee will examine the academic progress of all students for retention in the program.

If a student receives either two C's, one D, or one F grade in any English graduate level course, that student will be subject to review and could be dismissed from the program. In order to remain in good standing, all graduate students must maintain a 3.0 average in English Department courses.

III. Accelerated B.A./M.A. Program in English

This program allows outstanding undergraduates to begin the coursework for the Master of Arts in English during their senior year. Students are encouraged to begin planning to enter the Accelerated B.A./M.A. program early in their undergraduate career, in consultation with their advisor in the Department of English.

Working with the undergraduate and graduate academic coordinators, undergraduates selected into this program begin a carefully tailored course of study that will allow them to complete their B.A. degree while also begin the coursework toward their M.A.

To apply, students should have a minimum 3.25 grade point average, and must submit two reference letters and a copy of their transcript to the English department. Exceptions to the minimum GPA will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Each applicant will complete an interview with the graduate coordinator in English.

Students must also apply to the Graduate School for “combination senior” status, which allows them to take graduate courses in English. To continue in the program past the B.A., students must apply for admission into the Graduate School.

Up to 9 hours of graduate course work may be applied to both the undergraduate and graduate programs.

IV. MFA in Creative Writing Degree Program

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing provides studies in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, along with a variety of options for either a studio degree in Creative Writing, or a degree combining work in either the Department of English or other departments in which course work, or independent study, seems particularly pertinent to the student's creative thesis. A book-length thesis of publishable quality is required; it will be directed by a member of the MFA faculty. The MFA requires 48 graduate semester hours, with a 3.00 grade point average in all graduate courses.

A. Admission

  1. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.75 at the undergraduate level.
  2. An official undergraduate and if applicable graduate transcript sent to Graduate Admissions.
  3. A portfolio of published or unpublished writing samples in the applicant's chosen genre (at least 20-25 pages of fiction, 10 poems, or 25 pages of nonfiction), demonstrating a potential for development to a professional standard of writing, should be submitted to the English Graduate Office along with two letters of recommendation and a cover letter stating the candidate’s choice of genre and reasons for pursuing the degree. The writing sample will be evaluated by a committee of MFA faculty. The committee will recommend admission of those applicants with the highest demonstrated talent.
  4. Students who wish to change genres after being accepted in one genre, even if they are already registered and enrolled in the program, must submit a new portfolio of work in the new genre and be approved by the MFA faculty for admission in the new genre.
  5. Baccalaureate degree in English or if baccalaureate is in another field, twelve (12) semester hours in upper division literature or creative writing courses with a minimum grade point average of 2.75 in these courses.
  6. Graduate Record General Examination (a competitive score on the verbal section is expected).
  7. Deadlines: for best consideration apply by January 15 for the following fall semester admission and October 15 for following spring semester. Applications may be considered later but prospective students applying by those dates have first priority.

B. MA Credit

Any applicant who holds an MA degree in English may apply up to a maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours in English earned for that degree toward the MFA degree, with the approval of the graduate coordinator. A student's advisor will insure that the combination of MA credits and courses taken in the program has appropriate breadth. Credit previously earned at another institution must be presented for evaluation not later than the end of the student’s second semester of enrollment.

C. Program Requirements

All students must fulfill the 48-hour degree requirement from the Core Requirements in section 1 in combination with one area of specialization under the Additional Requirements in section 2: the Studio Option, the Literary Studies Option, The Creative/Professional Option, the TESL/TEFL Option, or the Cross-Disciplinary Option.

  1. Core Requirements
    1. Writing Workshops and Forms Courses — A total of six courses, of at least 3 hours each, required:
      four courses from 7601, 7602, 7603, 7605, 7606, and 7607, at least 3 of which must be in chosen genre;
      one forms class (7470, 7471, or 7472) in chosen genre;
      and one cross-genre course: (6610, 7470, 7471, 7601, or 7602 for poets), (6610, 7472 or 7603 for fiction writers and creative nonfiction writers). 6610 may serve as a cross-genre course if the focus was on a cross-genre, but the student must submit a portfolio of cross-genre work from the course and get written approval from the Creative Writing Coordinator.
    2. Creative Writing Colloquium ENGL 7900. At least two sections of 7900 must be taken, each for at least 3 hours.
    3. Thesis (ENGL 7996), three (3) semester hours. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
    4. A Comprehensive Exam based on a reading list formed by the student and the student's thesis director.
    5. Oral review of thesis.

NOTE: Although it is not a core requirement for the degree, all students receiving a Teaching Assistantship must take ENGL 7003 either before they become a teaching assistant or during their first semester of teaching. It is included as an alternative course in each of the options for additional requirements below.

  1. Additional Requirements: 7 courses, of at least 3 hours each, chosen from one of the following options:
    1. Studio Option: twenty-one (21) hours chosen from the following:
      6610, 7470, 7471, 7472, 7475, 7485, 7601, 7602, 7603, 7604, 7605, 7606, and 7607.
      Students may take, as an alternative to replace up to 3 of these courses, an equivalent number of other courses (of 3 hours or more each) from other disciplines within the Department of English (this includes ENGL 7003, which is a requirement if the student receives a Teaching Assistantship).Note: as stated in the course descriptions, 7475 and 7485 can only be counted for a maximum of 6 hours each toward the degree requirements.
    2. Literary Studies Option: twenty-one (21) hours made up of the following:
      at least 9 hours of Literature Courses;
      at least 3 hours of Theory of Writing and English Language/Linguistics Courses (selected from ENGL 7020-29, 7003, 7501, 7511 through 7517, 7531 through 7537, 7590, 7801, 7802, 7803, and 7805);
      up to 6 hours of ENGL 7475 Literary Editing;
      up to 6 hours of ENGL 7485 Literary Arts Programming;
      up to 9 hours of Forms Courses: ENGL 6610, 7470, 7471, 7472.
    3. Creative/Professional Writing Option: twenty-one (21) hours selected from the following:
      Professional Writing Courses (6618, 6619, 7013, 7014, 7805, 7806, 7807, 7808, 7809, 7816, 7818, and 7890);
      ENGL 7003;
      up to 6 hours each of Literary Editing or Arts Programming Courses (ENGL 7475, 7485);
      up to 6 hours of internship, ENGL 7811. NOTE: all internships must be pre-approved by the coordinator of the Creative Writing program along with another professor in the student’s primary genre.
    4. TESL/TEFL Option: MFA students may fulfill the 21 optional hours beyond the core by taking 6 elective graduate hours in any area of English, Creative Writing, or Foreign Languages and by completing in addition the 15 hours required for the Certificate Program in Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TESL/TEFFL). (see section VI for additional details)
      Program Requirements:
      1. The certificate program requires completion of fifteen (15) semester credit hours.
      2. Twelve (12) credit hours must be met by satisfactory completion of the following courses:
        1. ENGL 7531 Theory and History of ESL (3 Hours)
        2. ENGL 7532 Principles of Skills Assessment (3 Hours)
        3. ENGL 7535 ESL Grammar (3 Hours)
        4. ENGL 7530 Field Experience and Practicum in ESL (3 Hours)
      3. Three (3) elective hours may be selected from:
        1. ENGL 7533 Methods and Techniques of ESL in K-12 (3 Hours)
        2. ENGL 7536 Issues in Second Language Writing (3 Hours)
        3. ENGL 7537 Issues in Second Language Reading (3 Hours)
        4. ENGL 7538 Cultural Issues in ESL (3 Hours)
        5. ENGL 6533 Issues and Techniques in English as a Foreign Language (3 Hours)
      4. Note: Those also seeking ESL add-on endorsement must complete ENGL 7533 and ENGL7538. Praxis II for ESL is also required for the add-on endorsement.
    5. Cross-Disciplinary Option: twenty-one (21) hours selected from the following: up to 3 English graduate courses from any discipline (includes ENGL 7003); and at least 12 hours of graduate courses from another department: Art, History, Journalism, Theater, Foreign Languages, or other department in which course work, or independent study, seems particularly pertinent to the student’s creative thesis.
      Up to 9 of the 21 hours may be fulfilled by independent study in another department and/or internship hours, but all cross-disciplinary courses/independent studies/internships must be pre-approved by the coordinator of the Creative Writing program along with another professor in the student’s primary genre. Internships must be of a nature that will allow the student to participate in research that will form the basis of the student’s thesis.
      Note: Although taking all 12 hours of the cross-disciplinary minimum in only one other department is not required, it is recommended that the student focus primarily on one area or else have a clear rationale for fulfilling the 12-hour minimum in more than one cross-disciplinary area.

D. Retention Requirements

Upon entering the MFA program, a student chooses an advisor in his or her concentration. The advisor will monitor the student's progress toward completion of the degree. Each semester the Graduate Studies Committee will examine the academic progress of all students for retention in the program. If a student receives either two C's, one D, or one F grade in any English graduate level course, that student will be subject to review and could be dismissed from the program. In order to remain in good standing, all graduate students must maintain a 3.0 average in all courses. Students who are on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program.

V. PhD in English: Writing and Language Studies Degree Program

The PhD in English is designed to prepare scholars in widely recognized fields of English, as well as to prepare advanced writing specialists in the fields of business and industry. The structure of the program provides for four related concentrations (Composition Studies, Professional Writing, Applied Linguistics, Literary and Cultural Studies) that offer students the professional flexibility that comes with competencies acquired through preparation in a broadly integrative discipline.

A. Admission

The following are required for admission to the PhD program in English for all applicants, whether applying with a bachelor’s or master’s degree.

  1. Fulfillment of University requirements for admission to the Graduate School.
  2. Official undergraduate and graduate transcript(s) sent to Graduate Admissions.
  3. A competitive GRE verbal score. In addition, international students for whom English is not their first language typically submit a score of 575 or above on paper (or computer equivalent) on the TOEFL exam.
  4. A bachelor’s or master’s degree from an accredited college or university in the United States, usually with a major or a strong minor in English, or the equivalent of one of these degrees in another country.
  5. Minimum undergraduate and graduate grade point average of 3.25 is expected.
  6. Evidence of competence in writing in English as evidenced by a statement of purpose and a sample of the applicant’s best work.
  7. Three letters of recommendation, preferably from college/university professors of English or comparable disciplines.
  8. Program Admission: We normally evaluate applicants for the PhD program once each year in January for admission in the Fall semester. Although the Graduate Studies Committee may consider the application of a promising student at other times, January 15 is the deadline by which we must receive all the application materials of anyone who wishes to be considered for an assistantship for the following academic year.

B. Retention Requirements

Upon entering the PhD program, a student chooses an advisor in his or her concentration. The advisor will monitor the student’s progress towards completion of the degree. Each semester, the Graduate Studies Committee will examine the academic progress of all students for retention in the program. If a student receives either two C's, one D, or one F grade in any English graduate level course, that student will be subject to review and could be dismissed from the program. In order to remain in good standing, all graduate students must maintain a 3.0 average in English Department courses. Students who are on academic probation for two consecutive semesters will not be allowed to continue in the program.

C. Graduation Requirements

  1. General Requirements
    1. A minimum of 72 hours of graduate credit beyond the bachelor’s degree is required. At least 60 hours of credit must be equivalent to 7000-level coursework or higher.
    2. Students entering the PhD program with a master’s degree may count up to 33 hours of graduate credit toward the 72 hours needed for the PhD. Only graduate hours that were not used for a previous graduate degree and that do not exceed university time restrictions can be transferred. Credit previously earned at another institution must be presented for evaluation not later than the end of the student’s second semester of enrollment.
    3. Master’s level courses will be examined on an individual basis for applicability to the program. Students with a master’s degree must complete at least 39 hours of graduate coursework beyond that master’s degree.
    4. No more than 9 hours granted for dissertation work may be used to attain the required 72 hours for the PhD.
  2. Residency Requirements. The student must complete two successive terms full-time (excluding summer sessions) to fulfill residency requirements.
  3. Core Requirements. Students must take 12 hours in English courses outside of their concentration or focus area, plus 3 hours in English Studies Colloquium (ENGL 8900).
  4. Concentration Requirements (beyond Core Requirements)
    1. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Composition Studies must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of ENGL 7/8003, 7/8801, 7/8806, and 7/8822; and 21 hours in Composition.
    2. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Professional Writing Studies must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of ENGL 7/8805, 7/8806, 7/8809, 7/8350; and 21 hours in Professional Writing.
    3. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Applied Linguistics must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of ENGL 7531/8531, ENGL 7511/8511, ENGL 7501/8501 and 3 hours in an approved research course; and 21 hours of courses in Applied Linguistics.
    4. PhD students pursuing a concentration in Literary and Cultural Studies will choose a focus area from the following:
      • Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture;
      • 18th c. and 19th c. Literature and Culture;
      • Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture;
      • African-American Literature and Culture;
      • Individual Option (defined by student in consultation with advisor)

    Students must complete a 12-hour breadth requirement consisting of 3 hours of course work in each of the first four focal areas; 9 hours in theory and methodology (including 3 hours in 7000/8000, and 6 hours from: 7/8336, 7/8477, 7/8478, 7/8480, 7/8701, 7/8702); 15 hours in the focus area (not counting course taken for breadth requirement.

  5. Electives. PhD students in Literary and Cultural Studies are required to take 12 hours of electives; PhD students in other concentrations are required to take 15 hours; courses may be taken outside the department in consultation with advisor.
  6. Examination Requirements
    1. Qualifying Examinations—Students entering without a master’s degree in English or 30 hours of appropriate graduate work, as determined by the Graduate Coordinator, must take a qualifying examination the semester after accumulating 30 hours of graduate work through graduate transfer credit and/or graduate courses completed at The University of Memphis. Qualifying examinations are designed to ascertain that the range of knowledge is appropriate at this level. These written exams will be tailored to the individual student’s course of study. The Graduate Coordinator will appoint an appropriate committee with expertise in the course of study. The qualifying exams are equivalent to the MA comprehensive exams. The MA comprehensive exams test the student's course work; however, the MA comprehensive exams in Composition Studies and Professional Writing also include a reading list. Examinations are graded high pass, pass, or fail. Students who pass the exam will be allowed to advance to doctoral-level study. However, a student who fails one section of the qualifying examination will be given one opportunity during the same semester or not later than the following semester to retake that section with a different question. A student who fails more than one exam question will be given an opportunity to take a different exam no later than the following semester.
    2. MA en route- Students entering without a master’s degree in English will be awarded an MA degree at the completion of the qualifying exam and 33 hours of appropriate work.
    3. Comprehensive Examinations—After completing the rest of their required courses, after satisfying their language and/or research requirement, and before they begin writing their dissertations, students must pass comprehensive examinations in accordance with concentration guidelines. The student must first form a comprehensive exam committee. The Ph.D. comprehensive exam committee for both the written and oral exams will consist of a minimum of four faculty members. The student will choose an advisor from his / her concentration who will be the chair of the committee. In consultation with the advisor, the student will choose two other members from the concentration and at least one faculty member from outside the concentration.
      There will be three written comprehensive exams and one oral exam.
      1. One four-hour proctored written exam will cover the Ph.D. student’s concentration. The objective of this exam is to demonstrate that the student has a command of 75-100 seminal texts, in his or her concentration, that are not, for the most part, included in the reading list for exam # 2. This list will be determined by each committee.
      2. A second proctored four-hour written exam will allow students to demonstrate that they have enough background / reading knowledge to qualify them to teach upper division and graduate courses in the student’s chosen area of specialization within the concentration. This area will be determined by the student in conjunction with his or her committee. The student will develop the reading list in conjunction with his or her advisor and / or committee, and the reading list for this portion of this exam will consist of between 50-75 texts (i.e., books, book chapters, and / or articles).
      3. A third written exam, a take-home exam, must consist of 3,500-5,000 words that test the student’s command of his or her knowledge of his or her proposed dissertation area. The objective of this exam is for the student to demonstrate that he or she has enough background / reading knowledge and an ability to write a sophisticated essay concerning a literature review of the student’s prospective dissertation area. This essay will cite at least 20-25 texts. The take-home exam should take no more than seven (7) days to complete.
        To allow time to study for the exams, students should take their first written exam within two semesters after completing all Ph.D. coursework (including the foreign language requirements). Students could then take one exam per week over three weeks. A student will have a maximum of two months to complete all of the comprehensive exams.
      4. After the written exams have been completed and graded, there will be a two-hour oral exam based upon the written exams.
      5. A student who fails one section of the comprehensive examination will be given one opportunity during the same semester or not later than the following semester to retake that section. A student who fails more than one section of the exam will be given an opportunity to take a different exam (with all new questions) no later than the following semester. A student who fails the second comprehensive exam will be dismissed from the program.
  7. Language Requirements
    1. Students in Applied Linguistics and Literary and Cultural Studies must demonstrate a reading knowledge of two foreign languages or fluency in one foreign language. Appropriate languages must be approved by the student's advisor and the graduate coordinator as relevant to the student's course of study.
    2. Students in Composition and Professional Writing must demonstrate competency with two research tools or analytic specialties, both of which must be directly relevant to the individual student's dissertation work and projected short-term professional goals. These tools or analytical specialties include a demonstrated level of competency in two foreign languages, fluency in one foreign language, or competency in one foreign language plus mastery of qualitative, quantitative, or historical research methodologies, or demonstrated competency with appropriate computer programs. See "Options for Fulfilling the Foreign Language Requirement," available from the department.
  8. Dissertation Requirements
    1. Advisory Committee—The student is responsible for choosing an advisory committee composed of at least four members of the graduate faculty best qualified to help him or her conduct research for the dissertation. If the student’s research requires expertise in a discipline outside the Department of English, the student, in consultation with his or her advisory committee chair, may ask up to one faculty member outside the Department of English to be part of the committee.
    2. Research Proposal—When the student has passed the comprehensive examinations and has done extensive preliminary research, he or she must present and defend a research proposal before the advisory committee. That defense will be open to the entire academic community. The student must give a copy of the proposal to all committee members at least two weeks before the scheduled meeting. The advisory committee must approve the proposal before the student may proceed with the dissertation. NOTE: Students should familiarize themselves with the Thesis/Dissertation Preparation Guide before starting to write.
    3. Defense—The dissertation committee will schedule a defense of the completed dissertation. Both the chair of the advisory committee and the candidate must ensure adequate consultation with members of the dissertation committee well in advance of the defense date.

VI. Certificate Program in Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TESL/TEFL)

The TESL/TEFL Graduate Certificate provides training to those interested in teaching English as a Second/ Foreign Language. The certificate is given for to those who complete the practical preparation needed to teach English both within and outside the United States to post-secondary students and adults. The specific courses for the certificate include the specific knowledge and skills specified for ESL teachers and identified by TESOL, Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. Students have the option of completing the program on-line. Click here to view corresponding gainful employment data.

Note: The Certificate in Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language is not a program to prepare K-12 ESL teachers. Pre-service and in-service teachers seeking an ESL certificate and an add-on endorsement in ESL for K-12 should contact the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences for details.

A. Admission Requirements

  1. Applicants should hold either an MA degree in any field or a BA degree in any field with a GPA of at least 2.75.
  2. International students must have a TOEFL score of 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 79 (internet-based).
  3. Applicants must submit a one-page personal statement and two letters of recommendation to the English Department.
  4. Since 12 credit hours in the certificate program may also count toward the MA degree, it is expected that many fully-admitted students will earn the certificate on their way to the MA degree. Certificate students wishing to earn the MA must make formal application for the master's program following all guidelines specified by the English Department and the University.

B. Program Requirements

  1. The certificate program requires completion of fifteen (15) semester credit hours.
  2. Twelve (12) credit hours must be met by satisfactory completion of the following core courses:
    1. ENGL 7531 Theory and History of ESL (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7532 Principles of Skills Assessment (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7535 ESL Grammar (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7530 Field Experience and Practicum in ESL (3 hours)
  3. Three (3) elective hours may be selected from:
    1. ENGL 7533 Method/Techniques of ESL in K-12 (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7536 Issues in Second Language Writing (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7537 Issues in Second Language Reading (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7538 Cultural Issues in ESL (3 hours)
    5. ENGL 6533 Issues and Techniques in English as a Foreign Language (3 hours)
  4. Note: Those also seeking ESL add-on endorsement must complete ENGL 7533 and ENGL 7538. Praxis II for ESL is also required for the add-on endorsement.

C. Retention Requirements
Same as retention policies applicable to Department of English graduate degree programs.

D. Graduation Requirements
Relatively early in the semester in which they intend to graduate, certificate candidates must file an Intent to Graduate Card with the Graduate School and a Candidacy form with the Graduate Coordinator for English.

VII. Certificate Program in African American Literature

The African American Literature certificate provides training to students interested in teaching African American Literature. The goal of the training is to 1) provide students with the preparation they need to teach African American Literature, and 2) give official recognition of preparation to help students qualify for jobs both within and outside the United States.

A. Admission Requirements

  1. Students eligible to take courses as non-degree seeking students at the University of Memphis can complete the certificate requirements.
  2. Applicants should send a letter of intent and two letters of recommendation to the Department of English Graduate Office. Applicants need to apply to both the University of Memphis Graduate School and the Department of English Graduate Office.
  3. An overall minimum grade point average of 2.75 in English or a related area is recommended at the undergraduate level.
  4. Since up to 12 credit hours from the certificate program may count toward the M.A., M.F.A., or Ph.D. degrees, it is expected that many already-admitted students will earn the certificate on their way to the M.A., M.F.A., or Ph.D. degree. Such students wishing to earn the Certificate must notify the Department of English Graduate Coordinator in writing.

B. Program Requirements

  1. The certificate program requires completion of fifteen (15) semester credit hours.
  2. Twelve (12) credit hours must be met by satisfactory completion of any four (4) of the following core courses:
    1. ENGL 7325 African American Literature, 1930-1960 (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7326 African American Literature of Memphis and the Mid-South (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7327 Studies in Form and Genre: African American Literature (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7328 Studies in Major Authors: African American Literature (3 hours)
    5. ENGL 7329 African American Literature, Beginnings to 1850 (3 hours)
    6. ENGL 7330 African American Literature, 1850-1900 (3 hours)
    7. ENGL 7331 Frederick Douglass (3 hours)
    8. ENGL 7332 Literature of the African Diaspora (3 hours)
    9. ENGL 7333 Amiri Baraka (3 hours)
    10. ENGL 7334 The Black Arts Movement (3 hours)
    11. ENGL 7335 African American Literature, 1989-Present (3 hours)
    12. ENGL 7336 African American Literary Theory (3 hours)
    13. ENGL 7465 African American Literature 1960 to 1988 (3 hours)
    14. ENGL 7468 Literature of the Harlem Renaissance (3 hours)
    15. ENGL 7469 African American Women Writers (3 hours)
  3. Three (3) elective hours may be selected from one of the following courses, provided it has an African American Literature component:
    1. ENGL 7323 American Literature to 1865 (3 hours)
    2. ENGL 7324 American Literature, 1865-1914 (3 hours)
    3. ENGL 7391 Modern American Novel (3 hours)
    4. ENGL 7392 American Poetry (3 hours)
    5. ENGL 7393 American Drama (3 hours)
    6. ENGL 7464 Contemporary American Literature (3 hours)

C. Retention Requirements
Same as retention policies applicable to Department of English graduate degree programs.

D. Graduation Requirements
Relatively early in the semester in which they intend to graduate, certificate candidates must file an Intent to Graduate Card with the Graduate School and a Candidacy form with the Graduate Coordinator for English.


ENGLISH (ENGL)

In addition to the courses below, the department may offer the following Special Topics courses:
ENGL 7020-49–8020-49. Special Topics in English. (3). Topics are announced in online course listings.


ENGL 6500 - Lang Skills For Intrntl (3)
English majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

ENGL 6533 - Issues/Techniques/Efl (3)
Skills, background, and approaches needed to teach English outside the United States.

ENGL 6610 - Creative Writing/Translation (3)
Study and practice in translating poetry, fiction, or non-fiction; use of creative writing as tool in teaching of foreign language. May be repeated for credit with change of topic or genre. PREREQUISITE: 3000-level creative writing workshop in the same genre (fiction, poetry, or creative non-fiction), and permission of instructor.

ENGL 6611 - English Studies/Internl Locale (3-6)
Blended course of on-campus and national or international study and research in specific areas related to topic culminating in an integrative experience through individual and/or group projects. Varied topics may require studies of relationships of culture to text and language, history, analysis, documentation, and/or production of test and language. Course may be repeated, but only 6 credit hours may be earned towards a degree. PREREQUISITE: permission of instructor.

ENGL 6618 - Document Design (3)
Theories of visual and written communication, focusing on the interrelationship between visual and verbal elements; practice in effective design using layout and graphics software; working on client projects in a collaborative setting. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 3601 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 6619 - Web Design/Online Writing (3)
Principles and techniques of creating online user help for software and usable web sites; emphasis on needs of technical writers in professional development environment; task analysis, information architecture, content management, single sourcing, visual rhetoric, navigation, usability testing; technology tools intensive. Students who have received credit for ENGL 4617 cannot take this course for credit. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 6618, or permission of instructor.

ENGL 7000 - Literary Research (3)
Various approaches to literary scholarship and research methodology; introduction to professional standards, bibliographical methods, and procedures of scholarship and criticism. NOTE: This course is required for Literature majors and should be taken in the first year of graduate study.

ENGL 7001 - Lang And Composition (3)
Studies in the craft of composition, with focus upon sound editorial practice and the writing and analysis of the varieties of expository prose.

ENGL 7003 - Thry/Prac Tchng Comp (3)
Designed for graduate assistants teaching English 1010. Emphasis on the ways and techniques of teaching rudiments of English composition on college level. Each graduate teaching assistant in the Department of English must enroll in English 7003-8003 before or concurrent with first teaching assignment.

ENGL 7012 - Seminar Health Comm (3)
(Same as COMM 7012-8012). Examines current issues in health communication research, including patient-provider relationships, new technologies and health promotion, and health organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7013 - Wkshp Hlth Care Writing (3)
Textual and contextual analysis of the kinds of writing produced for expert audiences in the healthcare industry and the academic research community; practice in writing documents such as technical proposals, clinical research reports, FDA documentation, and papers for publication.

ENGL 7014 - Wkshp Public Hlth Care Writing (3)
Theoretical understanding and skill-based practice in communicating healthcare information (patient education materials, public health care information, patient instructions) to a generally non-expert audience; rhetorical and analytical tools for shaping the information; practical skills for managing group projects and processes; and the opportunity to develop them in a workshop setting.

ENGL 7100 - Independent Study (1-3)
Focuses on a selected topic dealing with language study or a literary form, theme, figure, or movement. Topic chosen by student and approved by student's advisor and Department Chair. Can be used only as an elective. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

ENGL 7211 - Medieval Literature (3)
Studies of selected literary texts from the Middle Ages.

ENGL 7230 - Chaucer (3)
Studies of works by Geoffrey Chaucer in Middle English.

ENGL 7232 - Shakespeare Tragedies (3)
Study of the language, contexts, and themes of Shakespeare's tragedies.

ENGL 7233 - Shakspr/Comdy & Histr (3)
Study of the language, contexts, and themes of Shakespeare's comedies and histories.

ENGL 7242 - English Renaissance Lit (3)
Survey of the major works of the Renaissance.

ENGL 7254 - English Lit 17c (3)
Study of the poetry and prose of seventeenth-century England.

ENGL 7256 - Milton (3)
Study of Milton's poetry.

ENGL 7264 - En Poet/Prose 1660-1800 (3)
Study of drama, fiction, poetry, and essays from Restoration and eighteenth-century Britain.

ENGL 7265 - 18th C British Novel (3)
Study of the eighteenth-century British novel with special emphasis on the development of the novel as a literary genre.

ENGL 7276 - English Lit Romantic (3)
Exploration of major authors, themes, and/or movements in British Romantic literature.

ENGL 7278 - Victorian Literature (3)
Study of one or more aspects of poetry, prose, fiction or drama of the Victorian period and the historical and social circumstances in which they were produced.

ENGL 7280 - 19th C British Novel (3)
Study of notable works of British fiction written between 1790 and 1900.

ENGL 7291 - Modern British Novel (3)
Survey of British novels from the period 1880 to 1945.

ENGL 7292 - Modern British Poetry (3)
Study of important British and UK poetry written from 1890 to the present.

ENGL 7293 - Modern British Drama (3)
Study of British drama from Oscar Wilde to the present.

ENGL 7320 - American Lit to 1820 (3)
Advanced study of central texts, persistent themes, and literary movements from European-American contact until the end of the early republican period of the United States.

ENGL 7322 - American Lit 1820-1865 (3)
Survey of major authors, themes, and movements in American literature from 1820-1865.

ENGL 7324 - American Lit 1865-1914 (3)
Study of American literature from the Civil War to WWI, with special emphasis on the development of literary realism, regionalism, and naturalism in American literary and cultural history.

ENGL 7325 - Africn Am Lit 1930-1960 (3)
Focuses on the rise of African American modernism and its role in the development of protest literature of the 1960s; locates texts in multiple literary traditions, but concentrates on their relation to traditions of African American and Anglo-American writing.

ENGL 7326 - A A Lit/Memphis/M South (3)
Focuses on the rise of African American literature from the cultural matrix that became Memphis, a gathering point and crossroads for African American writers of all genres from 1867 Reconstructionist writings to the present southern Hip Hop Writers movement.

ENGL 7327 - Form/Genre:Afr-Amer Lit (3)
Examination of the development of an African American literary genre such as African American poetry, the slave narrative, or the African American novel. Through study of both primary and secondary texts, students will gain an understanding of the historical context in which a specific African American literary genre emerged, as well as become conversant in the critical discussions in which these literary forms are defined and theorized. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 7328 - Maj Authors:Afr-Amer Lit (3)
Study of the works of selected writers or cultural figures, as well as examination of the scholarship framing the author's career. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 7329 - Afr-Amer Lit/Beg to 1850 (3)
Survey of African American literature from the Colonial Period to 1850.

ENGL 7330 - Afr-Amer Lit 1850-1900 (3)
Survey of African American literature from 1850-1900.

ENGL 7331 - Frederick Douglass (3)
Study of Frederick Douglass, including his slave narratives, autobiographies, letters, short fiction, and public speeches.

ENGL 7332 - Lit of the African Diaspora (3)
Examination of literatures of the African diaspora outside of the U.S. May include Anglophone literatures, as well as literatures taught in translation. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 7333 - Amiri Baraka (3)
Study of the work of Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), including poetry, drama, fiction, theory, music criticism, and autobiography.

ENGL 7334 - The Black Arts Movement (3)
Survey of Black Arts Movement, which encompassed the years 1960-1975 (approximately). May include study of novels, poems, plays, theoretical texts, and the visual arts, as well as examination of the community and cultural contexts within which these works were produced.

ENGL 7335 - Afr-Amer Lit 1989 to Present (3)
Survey of African American writing from 1989 to the present, situated in relation to recent developments in theory and other arts as well as contemporary cultural and political contexts.

ENGL 7336 - Afr-Amer Literary Theory (3)
Examination of the critical movements in African American Literary Theory from 1900 to present.

ENGL 7350 - Rhetorical Theory (3)
(Same as COMM 7350-8350). History of rhetoric from the sophists through the present; includes readings from Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Erasmus, Ramus, Campbell, Blair, John Q. Adams, and others.

ENGL 7371 - Rhetorical Criticism (3)
(Same as COMM 7371-8371). Examines principal modes of contemporary rhetorical analysis. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 7391 - American Novel (3)
Intensive study of American novels.

ENGL 7392 - American Poetry (3)
Intensive study of American poetry.

ENGL 7393 - American Drama (3)
Intensive study of American drama.

ENGL 7394 - Modern American Lit (3)
Advanced study of American literature produced between 1900 and 1950.

ENGL 7395 - Am Literary Movements (3)
Advanced study of a specific American literary movement, such as the Southern Agrarian Movement, the Beat Generation, or American Transcendentalism. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 7396 - Form and Genre in Am Lit (3)
Advanced study of a specific form or genre in American literature, such as the novel, the essay, the lyric poem, or the play. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 7397 - Intellectual Bkgrnds of Am Lit (3)
Advanced study of aspects of philosophy and the history of ideas as they relate to the development and interpretation of American literary texts and American literary culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 7398 - Cultural Contexts of Am Lit (3)
Study of cultural contexts of key texts of American literature, including discussions of how such texts connect to political and social histories or concepts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 7399 - Multi-Cultural Am Lit (3)
Advanced study of multi-ethnic American literatures, including readings by writers focusing on the experiences of Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 7432 - Quant Research Methods (3)
(Same as COMM 7432-8432). Survey of quantitative research in communication; practical experience in collecting and analyzing quantitative information.

ENGL 7441 - Studies in European Literature (3)
Movements and writers important to development of Continental Europe in the late eighteenth century to present. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 7442 - Modern European Drama (3)
Study of European drama from Isben to the present.

ENGL 7451 - Women And Literature (3)
Literature and criticism by and about women.

ENGL 7452 - Biography Process/Text (3)
Study of biography and the biographical process.

ENGL 7462 - Cont British/Cmwlth Lit (3)
Authors, works, genres, and literary styles in development of contemporary British and Commonwealth literatures.

ENGL 7464 - Contmp American Lit (3)
Authors, works, genres, and literary styles in development of contemporary American literature.

ENGL 7465 - Afr-Amer Lit 1960-1988 (3)
Major African American writers and/or movements from the 1960s up to 1988.

ENGL 7466 - Contmp World Lit/Tnstn (3)
Contemporary non-English fiction in translation, primarily from non-Western European cultures; focus on major movements and writers.

ENGL 7468 - Lit Harlem Renaissance (3)
Examination of poetry, prose, and drama from the period known as the "Harlem Renaissance" within the context of space, place, and geography.

ENGL 7469 - Af Amer Women Writers (3)
Examines the variety of ways black women writers have reclaimed the creative power of agency, emphasizing areas of difference as well as continuity within the African American literary tradition; combines considerations of context, both historical and political, with rigorous textual and theoretical analyses.

ENGL 7470 - Forms Creative Nonfict (3)
Creative nonfiction with attention to historical roots and contemporary theory and practice. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic/course content and approval of Program Coordinator.

ENGL 7471 - Forms Of Fiction (3)
A study of how fiction works through analyzing the short story, the novella, and the novel with attention to historical developments. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic/course content and approval of Program Coordinator.

ENGL 7472 - Forms Of Poetry (3)
A study of meters, forms, and types of poetry in English with attention to the principal traditions and critical ideas associated with the writing of verse in English. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic/course content and approval of Program Coordinator.

ENGL 7473 - Verbal/Visual Texts (3)
Study of intersection of the verbal and the visual in illuminated manuscripts, graphic novels, children's books, illustrated books, video games, websites, and other sites. Depending upon the instructor?s choice, one or more of these genres and works of every period will be studied. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic.

ENGL 7475 - Literary Publishing (3)
Development of skills involved in editing, producing, and marketing a literary magazine; further training in the skills of publishing the student?s own literary texts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 7476 - Mod Pop & Lit Tradition (3)
Examination of issues (e.g. gender, nationalism, punishment) as they are represented in the texts of high and low culture beginning in the modern period, emphasizing how such representation challenges the distinction between high and low culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7478 - Textuality & Identity (3)
Relationship between textuality and social groups. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7480 - Cultural Texts and Theories (3)
Advanced social, political, and cultural theories that structure the understanding of cultural texts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7481 - Early Pop Lit Trad (3)
Examination of the relationship of texts of both high and low culture up to the modern period. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 7485 - Lit Arts Programming (3)
Development of skills involved in planning and administering community arts events and organizations; further training in the skills of author interviewing and book reviewing. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 7501 - History English Lang (3)
Development of English from a minor Germanic dialect to a major international language.

ENGL 7507 - Empirical Mthds Ling Rsrch (3)
Develop research questions and hypotheses, prepare language surveys, use linguistic databases, perform qualitative and quanitative analysis of linguistic data, use computational tools, and prepare findings for presentation, and publication of research on the study of language use.

ENGL 7508 - Corpus Linguistics (3)
History, design, creation, interpretation, and applications of corpora in applied language research.

ENGL 7509 - African American Linguistics (3)
Study of African American Vernacular English, including historical development, linguistic features, correlation with ethnic identity, fictional representation, contributions to General American English, and controversies concerning use in schools.

ENGL 7510 - Gender and Language (3)
Study of gender as a variable as it intersects with language use in a variety of contexts, including professional, legal, medical, and classroom settings.

ENGL 7511 - Survey of Linguistics (3)
Introduction to the nature of language with emphasis on basic principles of English phonology, morphology, and syntax; emphasis on collecting and analyzing linguistic data for research purposes.

ENGL 7512 - Morphology and Syntax (3)
Study of English language structures emphasizing how form and meaning are integrally related.

ENGL 7514 - Sociolinguistics (3)
Language use in relation to social interaction and power structures; dialects and varieties of English; inequality in varied environments; appraisal of methodologies used in gathering and analyzing data.

ENGL 7515 - Language & Literature (3)
Application of linguistic theory to analysis of literature, nature of literary language, and linguistic options open to writers.

ENGL 7516 - Phonetics & Phonology (3)
Articulatory and linguistic phonetics, phonetic transcription, suprasegmental phonology, overview of English phonology, and information on teaching English pronunciation to speakers of other languages.

ENGL 7517 - Discourse Analysis (3)
Examination of the tools and methods used by various subdisciplines of English (linguistics, rhetoric, and literature) to analyze forms of discourse, including legal, medical, scientific, technical, business, literary, academic, and oral texts.

ENGL 7530 - Fld Exp/Pract In ESL (3-6)
Experience in observing and teaching, peer teaching, and work with an English as a Second Language (ESL) specialist. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

ENGL 7531 - Theory/History ESL (3)
Survey of relation of linguistic principles to second language acquisition.

ENGL 7532 - Theor Skill Assess ESL (3)
Application of theories of teaching second language skills with emphasis on testing in a second language.

ENGL 7533 - Meth/Tech ESL In K-12 (3)
Techniques and resources for working with children and adolescents for whom English is a second language.

ENGL 7534 - Second Lang Acquisition (3)
Theories of second language acquisition, development of second language proficiency, and research in bilingualism.

ENGL 7535 - ESL Grammar (3)
Grammatical systems and strategies of Modern English; analysis of English structures that tend to cause difficulty for ESL/SESD speakers.

ENGL 7536 - Second Language Writing (3)
Emphasis on research in second language writing, especially the role of psychological, social, and cultural influences on learning to write in a second language.

ENGL 7537 - Second Language Reading (3)
Emphasis on how non-native speakers of English learn to read in English, the effect of context and culture on L2 reading, and culturally related responses to reading and literacy traditions.

ENGL 7538 - Cultural Issues ESL (3)
Impact of culture on non-English language background speakers as well as the particular aspects of U.S. culture and traditions needed for successful acculturation.

ENGL 7590 - Appl/Theory Linguistics (3)
Intensive study of specialized areas in English linguistics. Maybe repeated up to 9 hours with change of topic.

ENGL 7601 - Creative Nonfiction Wkshp (3)
Emphasis on examination and discussion of creative nonfiction written by students. May be repeated 10 times for a maximum of 30 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 7602 - Fiction Workshop (3)
Emphasis on the examination and the discussion of fiction written by students. May be repeated 10 times for a maximum of 30 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 7603 - Poetry Workshop (3)
Emphasis on the examination and the discussion of poetry written by students. May be repeated 10 times for a maximum of 30 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 7604 - Creative Writing Wkshp (3)
Emphasis on examination and discussion of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction written by students. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change of genre. PREREQUISITE: permission of instructor.

ENGL 7605 - Adv Grad Fiction Wkshp (3)
Designed for candidates in MFA program in Creative Writing who have shown particular excellence in ENGL 7602. May be repeated 10 times for a maximum of 30 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 7602.

ENGL 7606 - Adv Creative Non-Fict Wkshp (3)
Designed for candidates in MFA program in Creative Writing who have shown particular excellence in ENGL 7601. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 7601.

ENGL 7607 - Advanced Poetry Workshop (3)
Designed for candidates in MFA program in Creative Writing who have shown particular excellence in ENGL 7603. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 7603.

ENGL 7621 - Seminar Argumentation (3)
(Same as COMM 7621-8621). Examines historical and contemporary argumentation theories and how those theories are incorporated into the teaching of oral argumentation and composition.

ENGL 7701 - Hist Crit Theory (3)
History of literary criticism and theory, classical to modern.

ENGL 7702 - Contemp Crit Theory (3)
Examination of major movements in contemporary literary criticism and theory.

ENGL 7801 - History Composition (3)
Focuses on history of composition as a discipline of its own; examines rise of teaching of composition from 18th century Scottish universities to the present and/or history of development of theoretical approaches toward teaching composition.

ENGL 7804 - Af Am Issues in Composition (3)
Focuses on current scholarship and research that address the marginalized voices of race in the teaching of composition. Closely examines the theories and research of this issue, and studies pedagogical strategies.

ENGL 7805 - Fndtns Tech Writing (3)
Introduction to fields of scientific, and corporate writing; relevant theories in the fields, including classical rhetoric, modern discourse theory, cognitive psychology, and semiotics; extensive practice in writing and analyzing technical documents.

ENGL 7806 - Resch Meth In Writing (3)
Bibliographic techniques and an introduction to empirical methodologies for the study of the writing process and the testing of written documents.

ENGL 7807 - Wksp/Govmt & Corp Wrtg (3)
Textual and contextual analysis of the kinds of writing produced most often in government, law, and business; practice in writing correspondence reports, briefs, manuals, and proposals.

ENGL 7808 - Wksp/Sci & Techn Wrtg (3)
Textual and contextual analysis of the kinds of writing produced most often in industry and the academic research community; practice in writing documents such as technical proposals, reports, computer documentation, and papers for publication.

ENGL 7809 - Technical Editing (3)
Current practices in editing and publication in the field of technical communication; topics include copy-editing, substantive editing, author-editor relations, and the production practice.

ENGL 7811 - Internship Prof Wrtng (3)
Assigned on the basis of qualifications and availability, student does a semester's work in technical, scientific, legal, government, or business writing and provides an extensive report and analysis. NOTE: Students who are on academic probation will not be allowed to register for this course. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 7/8805 and ENGL 7/8809. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

ENGL 7812 - Mphs Urban Wrtng Ins I (3)
(Same as ICL 7304-8304). Intensive study of writing research, current writing practices, and issues and trends related to K-12 writing instruction. English majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements.

ENGL 7813 - Mphs Urban Wrtng Ins II (3)
(Same as ICL 7305-8305). Prepares K-12 teachers to improve their own writing practices and assume a leadership role in writing instruction in their schools. English majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements.

ENGL 7815 - Sem History Rhetoric (3)
Examines different periods and issues of rhetorical history each semester. One semester will consider Greek rhetoric (beginnings throught the New Testament); another will consider Latin rhetoric (Cicero through the Renaissance); a third will cover Scottish, British, and American rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 7816 - Sem Thrsts Prof Wrtg (3)
A study of the works of major modern writing theorists in areas such as document design, collaboration, science, persuasion, editing, and writing process.

ENGL 7817 - Sem Comp Theorists (3)
Readings from and study of major modern theorists in invention, argumentation, literacy, writing, and discourse.

ENGL 7818 - Collaborative Writing (3)
Theoretical and research-based focus on managing and developing collaborative writing projects and processes.

ENGL 7819 - Rhetoric Of Science (3)
(Same as COMM 7819-8819). This course examines scientific and technical communication from phetorical perspective, showing how scientific knowledge is shaped not only by data and method, but also by persuasive purposes and sociocultural forces.

ENGL 7820 - Topics In Rhetoric (3)
(Same as COMM 7820-8820). Topical seminar devoted to an important aspect of the history, theory, or criticism of rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topics change.

ENGL 7822 - Cont Comp Theory (3)
Examines relationship between rhetorical and composition theory and contemporary philosophy, especially poststructuralism, neo-pragmatism, and hermeneutics.

ENGL 7823 - Topics In Composition (3)
Topics can include invention, the writing process, writing assessment, style, and writing program administration. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topics change.

ENGL 7890 - Topic/Technical Writing (3)
Intensive study of specialized areas in technical writing. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topics change.

ENGL 7900 - Creative Writing Colloquium (3)
A course in the preparation for the MFA thesis and the MFA comprehensive exam. NOTE: May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours, but only three hours with any one professor may be applied toward the degree; recommended to be taken in the last semester of regular course work and first semester of thesis work.

ENGL 7996 - Thesis (1-6)
A prospectus for the thesis must be approved by the student's advisor and the department chair before the student registers for this course. The completed thesis must be approved by at least two readers. NOTE: Students in Professional Writing must pass their comprehensive examination before registering for thesis hours and have the option of writing or producing a project or portfolio. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

ENGL 7997 - Portfolio (3)
A course for MA students in Professional Writing who choose to produce a project or portfolio instead of a thesis. Before registering for the course, students must pass their comprehensive examination and have a prospectus for the portfolio or project approved by their advisor and the coordinator of graduate studies.

ENGL 8000 - Literary Research (3)
Various approaches to literary scholarship and research methodology; introduction to professional standards, bibliographical methods, and procedures of scholarship and criticism. NOTE: This course is required for Literature majors and should be taken in the first year of graduate study.

ENGL 8001 - Lang And Composition (3)
Studies in the craft of composition, with focus upon sound editorial practice and the writing and analysis of the varieties of expository prose.

ENGL 8003 - Thry/Prac Tchng Comp (3)
Designed for graduate assistants teaching English 1010. Emphasis on the ways and techniques of teaching rudiments of English composition on college level. Each graduate teaching assistant in the Department of English must enroll in English 7003-8003 before or concurrent with first teaching assignment.

ENGL 8012 - Seminar Health Comm (3)
(Same as COMM 7012-8012). Examines current issues in health communication research, including patient-provider relationships, new technologies and health promotion, and health organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 8013 - Wkshp Hlth Care Writing (3)
Textual and contextual analysis of the kinds of writing produced for expert audiences in the healthcare industry and the academic research community; practice in writing documents such as technical proposals, clinical research reports, FDA documentation, and papers for publication.

ENGL 8014 - Wkshp Public Hlth Care Writing (3)
Theoretical understanding and skill-based practice in communicating healthcare information (patient education materials, public health care information, patient instructions) to a generally non-expert audience; rhetorical and analytical tools for shaping the information; practical skills for managing group projects and processes; and the opportunity to develop them in a workshop setting.

ENGL 8100 - Independent Study (1-3)
Focuses on a selected topic dealing with language study or a literary form, theme, figure, or movement. Topic chosen by student and approved by student's advisor and Department Chair. Can be used only as an elective. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

ENGL 8211 - Medieval Literature (3)
Studies of selected literary texts from the Middle Ages.

ENGL 8230 - Chaucer (3)
Studies of works by Geoffrey Chaucer in Middle English.

ENGL 8232 - Shakespeare Tragedies (3)
Study of the language, contexts, and themes of Shakespeare's tragedies.

ENGL 8233 - Shakspr/Comdy & Histr (3)
Study of the language, contexts, and themes of Shakespeare's comedies and histories.

ENGL 8242 - English Renaissance Lit (3)
Survey of the major works of the Renaissance.

ENGL 8254 - English Lit 17c (3)
Study of the poetry and prose of seventeenth-century England.

ENGL 8256 - Milton (3)
Study of Milton's poetry.

ENGL 8264 - En Poet/Prose 1660-1800 (3)
Study of drama, fiction, poetry, and essays from Restoration and eighteenth-century Britain.

ENGL 8265 - 18th C British Novel (3)
Study of the eighteenth-century British novel with special emphasis on the development of the novel as a literary genre.

ENGL 8276 - English Lit Romatic (3)
Exploration of major authors, themes, and/or movements in British Romantic literature.

ENGL 8278 - Victorian Literature (3)
Study of one or more aspects of poetry, prose, fiction or drama of the Victorian period and the historical and social circumstances in which they were produced.

ENGL 8280 - 19th C British Novel (3)
Study of notable works of British fiction written between 1790 and 1900.

ENGL 8291 - Modern British Novel (3)
Survey of British novels from the period 1880 to 1945.

ENGL 8292 - Modern British Poetry (3)
Study of important British and UK poetry written from 1890 to the present.

ENGL 8293 - Modern British Drama (3)
Study of British drama from Oscar Wilde to the present.

ENGL 8320 - American Lit to 1820 (3)
Advanced study of central texts, persistent themes, and literary movements from European-American contact until the end of the early republican period of the United States.

ENGL 8322 - American Lit 1820-1865 (3)
Survey of major authors, themes, and movements in American literature from 1820-1865.

ENGL 8324 - American Lit 1865-1914 (3)
Study of American literature from the Civil War to WWI, with special emphasis on the development of literary realism, regionalism, and naturalism in American literary and cultural history.

ENGL 8325 - Africn Am Lit 1930-1960 (3)
Focuses on the rise of African American modernism and its role in the development of protest literature of the 1960s; locates texts in multiple literary traditions, but concentrates on their relation to traditions of African American and Anglo-American writing.

ENGL 8326 - A A Lit/Memphis/M South (3)
Focuses on the rise of African American literature from the cultural matrix that became Memphis, a gathering point and crossroads for African American writers of all genres from 1867 Reconstructionist writings to the present southern Hip Hop Writers movement.

ENGL 8327 - Form/Genre:Afr-Amer Lit (3)
Examination of the development of an African American literary genre such as African American poetry, the slave narrative, or the African American novel. Through study of both primary and secondary texts, students will gain an understanding of the historical context in which a specific African American literary genre emerged, as well as become conversant in the critical discussions in which these literary forms are defined and theorized. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 8328 - Maj Authors:Afr-Amer Lit (3)
Study of the works of selected writers or cultural figures, as well as examination of the scholarship framing the author's career. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 8329 - Afr-Amer Lit/Beg to 1850 (3)
Survey of African American literature from the Colonial Period to 1850.

ENGL 8330 - Afr-Amer Lit 1850-1900 (3)
Survey of African American literature from 1850-1900.

ENGL 8331 - Frederick Douglass (3)
Study of Frederick Douglass, including his slave narratives, autobiographies, letters, short fiction, and public speeches.

ENGL 8332 - Lit of the African Diaspora (3)
Examination of literatures of the African diaspora outside of the U.S. May include Anglophone literatures, as well as literatures taught in translation. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 8333 - Amiri Baraka (3)
Study of the work of Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones), including poetry, drama, fiction, theory, music criticism, and autobiography.

ENGL 8334 - The Black Arts Movement (3)
Survey of Black Arts Movement, which encompassed the years 1960-1975 (approximately). May include study of novels, poems, plays, theoretical texts, and the visual arts, as well as examination of the community and cultural contexts within which these works were produced.

ENGL 8335 - Afr-Amer Lit 1989 to Present (3)
Survey of African American writing from 1989 to the present, situated in relation to recent developments in theory and other arts as well as contemporary cultural and political contexts.

ENGL 8336 - Afr-Amer Literary Theory (3)
Examination of the critical movements in African American Literary Theory from 1900 to present.

ENGL 8350 - Rhetorical Theory (3)
(Same as COMM 7350-8350). History of rhetoric from the sophists through the present; includes readings from Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Erasmus, Ramus, Campbell, Blair, John Q. Adams, and others.

ENGL 8371 - Rhetorical Criticism (3)
(Same as COMM 7371-8371). Examines principal modes of contemporary rhetorical analysis. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours.

ENGL 8391 - American Novel (3)
Intensive study of American novels.

ENGL 8392 - American Poetry (3)
Intensive study of American poetry.

ENGL 8393 - American Drama (3)
Intensive study of American drama.

ENGL 8394 - Modern American Lit (3)
Advanced study of American literature produced between 1900 and 1950.

ENGL 8395 - Am Literary Movements (3)
Advanced study of a specific American literary movement, such as the Southern Agrarian Movement, the Beat Generation, or American Transcendentalism. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 8396 - Form and Genre in Am Lit (3)
Advanced study of a specific form or genre in American literature, such as the novel, the essay, the lyric poem, or the play. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 8397 - Intellectual Bkgrnds of Am Lit (3)
Advanced study of aspects of philosophy and the history of ideas as they relate to the development and interpretation of American literary texts and American literary culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 8398 - Cultural Contexts of Am Lit (3)
Study of cultural contexts of key texts of American literature, including discussions of how such texts connect to political and social histories or concepts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 8399 - Multi-Cultural Am Lit (3)
Advanced study of multi-ethnic American literatures, including readings by writers focusing on the experiences of Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content.

ENGL 8432 - Quant Research Methods (3)
(Same as COMM 7432-8432). Survey of quantitative research in communication; practical experience in collecting and analyzing quantitative information.

ENGL 8441 - Studies in European Literature (3)
Movements and writers important to development of Continental Europe in the late eighteenth century to present. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 8442 - Modern European Drama (3)
Study of European drama from Isben to the present.

ENGL 8451 - Women And Literature (3)
Literature and criticism by and about women.

ENGL 8452 - Biography Process/Text (3)
Study of biography and the biographical process.

ENGL 8462 - Cont British/Cmwlth Lit (3)
Authors, works, genres, and literary styles in development of contemporary British and Commonwealth literatures.

ENGL 8464 - Contmp American Lit (3)
Authors, works, genres, and literary styles in development of contemporary American literature.

ENGL 8465 - Afr-Amer Lit 1960-1988 (3)
Major African American writers and/or movements from the 1960s up to 1988.

ENGL 8466 - Contmp World Lit/Tnstn (3)
Contemporary non-English fiction in translation, primarily from non-Western European cultures; focus on major movements and writers.

ENGL 8468 - Lit Harlem Renaissance (3)
Examination of poetry, prose, and drama from the period known as the "Harlem Renaissance" within the context of space, place, and geography.

ENGL 8469 - Af Amer Women Writers (3)
Examines the variety of ways black women writers have reclaimed the creative power of agency, emphasizing areas of difference as well as continuity within the African American literary tradition; combines considerations of context, both historical and political, with rigorous textual and theoretical analyses.

ENGL 8470 - Forms Creative Nonfict (3)
Creative nonfiction with attention to historical roots and contemporary theory and practice. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic/course content and approval of Program Coordinator.

ENGL 8471 - Forms Of Fiction (3)
A study of how fiction works through analyzing the short story, the novella, and the novel with attention to historical developments. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic/course content and approval of Program Coordinator.

ENGL 8472 - Forms Of Poetry (3)
A study of meters, forms, and types of poetry in English with attention to the principal traditions and critical ideas associated with the writing of verse in English. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic/course content and approval of Program Coordinator.

ENGL 8473 - Verbal/Visual Texts (3)
Study of intersection of the verbal and the visual in illuminated manuscripts, graphic novels, children's books, illustrated books, video games, websites, and other sites. Depending upon the instructor?s choice, one or more of these genres and works of every period will be studied. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change of topic.

ENGL 8475 - Literary Publishing (3)
Development of skills involved in editing, producing, and marketing a literary magazine; further training in the skills of publishing the student?s own literary texts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours with change in course content. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 8476 - Mod Pop & Lit Tradition (3)
Examination of issues (e.g. gender, nationalism, punishment) as they are represented in the texts of high and low culture beginning in the modern period, emphasizing how such representation challenges the distinction between high and low culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 8478 - Textuality & Identity (3)
Relationship between textuality and social groups. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 8480 - Cultural Texts and Theories (3)
Advanced social, political, and cultural theories that structure the understanding of cultural texts. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 8481 - Early Pop Lit Trad (3)
Examination of the relationship of texts of both high and low culture up to the modern period. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

ENGL 8485 - Lit Arts Programming (3)
Development of skills involved in planning and administering community arts events and organizations; further training in the skills of author interviewing and book reviewing. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 8501 - History English Lang (3)
Development of English from a minor Germanic dialect to a major international language.

ENGL 8507 - Empirical Mthds Ling Rsrch (3)
Develop research questions and hypotheses, prepare language surveys, use linguistic databases, perform qualitative and quanitative analysis of linguistic data, use computational tools, and prepare findings for presentation, and publication of research on the study of language use.

ENGL 8508 - Corpus Linguistics (3)
History, design, creation, interpretation, and applications of corpora in applied language research.

ENGL 8509 - African American Linguistics (3)
Study of African American Vernacular English, including historical development, linguistic features, correclation with ethnic identity, fictional representation, contributions to General American English, and controversies concerning use in schools.

ENGL 8510 - Gender and Language (3)
Study of gender as a variable as it intersects with language use in a variety of contexts, including professional, legal, medical, and classroom settings.

ENGL 8511 - Survey of Linguistics (3)
Introduction to the nature of language with emphasis on basic principles of English phonology, morphology, and syntax; emphasis on collecting and analyzing linguistic data for research purposes.

ENGL 8512 - Morphology and Syntax (3)
Study of English language structures emphasizing how form and meaning are integrally related.

ENGL 8514 - Sociolinguistics (3)
Language use in relation to social interaction and power structures; dialects and varieties of English; inequality in varied environments; appraisal of methodologies used in gathering and analyzing data.

ENGL 8515 - Language & Literature (3)
Application of linguistic theory to analysis of literature, nature of literary language, and linguistic options open to writers.

ENGL 8516 - Phonetics & Phonology (3)
Articulatory and linguistic phonetics, phonetic transcription, suprasegmental phonology, overview of English phonology, and information on teaching English pronunciation to speakers of other languages.

ENGL 8517 - Discourse Analysis (3)
Examination of the tools and methods used by various subdisciplines of English (linguistics, rhetoric, and literature) to analyze forms of discourse, including legal, medical, scientific, technical, business, literary, academic, and oral texts.

ENGL 8530 - Fld Exp/Pract In ESL (3-6)
Experience in observing and teaching, peer teaching, and work with an English as a Second Language (ESL) specialist. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

ENGL 8531 - Theory/History ESL (3)
Survey of relation of linguistic principles to second language acquisition.

ENGL 8532 - Theor Skill Assess ESL (3)
Application of theories of teaching second language skills with emphasis on testing in a second language.

ENGL 8533 - Meth/Tech ESL In K-12 (3)
Techniques and resources for working with children and adolescents for whom English is a second language.

ENGL 8534 - Second Lang Acquisition (3)
Theories of second language acquisition, development of second language proficiency, and research in bilingualism.

ENGL 8535 - ESL Grammar (3)
Grammatical systems and strategies of Modern English; analysis of English structures that tend to cause difficulty for ESL/SESD speakers.

ENGL 8536 - Second Language Writing (3)
Emphasis on research in second language writing, especially the role of psychological, social, and cultural influences on learning to write in a second language.

ENGL 8537 - Second Language Reading (3)
Emphasis on how non-native speakers of English learn to read in English, the effect of context and culture on L2 reading, and culturally related responses to reading and literacy traditions.

ENGL 8538 - Cultural Issues ESL (3)
Impact of culture on non-English language background speakers as well as the particular aspects of U.S. culture and traditions needed for successful acculturation.

ENGL 8590 - Appl/Theory Linguistics (3)
Intensive study of specialized areas in English linguistics. Maybe repeated up to 9 hours with change of topic.

ENGL 8601 - Creative Nonfiction Wkshp (3)
Emphasis on examination and discussion of creative nonfiction written by students. May be repeated 10 times for a maximum of 30 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 8602 - Fiction Workshop (3)
Emphasis on the examination and the discussion of fiction written by students. May be repeated 10 times for a maximum of 30 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 8603 - Poetry Workshop (3)
Emphasis on the examination and the discussion of poetry written by students. May be repeated 10 times for a maximum of 30 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 8606 - Adv Creative Non-Fict Wkshp (3)
Designed for candidates in MFA program in Creative Writing who have shown particular excellence in ENGL 7601. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 7601.

ENGL 8607 - Advanced Poetry Workshop (3)
Designed for candidates in MFA program in Creative Writing who have shown particular excellence in ENGL 7603. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 7603.

ENGL 8621 - Seminar Argumentation (3)
(Same as COMM 7621-8621). Examines historical and contemporary argumentation theories and how those theories are incorporated into the teaching of oral argumentation and composition.

ENGL 8701 - Hist Crit Theory (3)
History of literary criticism and theory, classical to modern.

ENGL 8702 - Contemp Crit Theory (3)
Examination of major movements in contemporary literary criticism and theory.

ENGL 8801 - History Composition (3)
Focuses on history of composition as a discipline of its own; examines rise of teaching of composition from 18th century Scottish universities to the present and/or history of development of theoretical approaches toward teaching composition.

ENGL 8804 - Af Am Issues in Composition (3)
Focuses on current scholarship and research that address the marginalized voices of race in the teaching of composition. Closely examines the theories and research of this issue, and studies pedagogical strategies.

ENGL 8805 - Fndtns Tech Writing (3)
Introduction to fields of scientific, and corporate writing; relevant theories in the fields, including classical rhetoric, modern discourse theory, cognitive psychology, and semiotics; extensive practice in writing and analyzing technical documents.

ENGL 8806 - Resch Meth In Writing (3)
Bibliographic techniques and an introduction to empirical methodologies for the study of the writing process and the testing of written documents.

ENGL 8807 - Wksp/Govmt & Corp Wrtg (3)
Textual and contextual analysis of the kinds of writing produced most often in government, law, and business; practice in writing correspondence reports, briefs, manuals, and proposals.

ENGL 8808 - Wksp/Sci & Techn Wrtg (3)
Textual and contextual analysis of the kinds of writing produced most often in industry and the academic research community; practice in writing documents such as technical proposals, reports, computer documentation, and papers for publication.

ENGL 8809 - Technical Editing (3)
Current practices in editing and publication in the field of technical communication; topics include copy-editing, substantive editing, author-editor relations, and the production practice.

ENGL 8811 - Internship Prof Wrtng (3)
Assigned on the basis of qualifications and availability, student does a semester's work in technical, scientific, legal, government, or business writing and provides an extensive report and analysis. NOTE: Students who are on academic probation will not be allowed to register for this course. PREREQUISITE: ENGL 7/8805 and ENGL 7/8809. Grades of A-F, or IP will be given.

ENGL 8812 - Mphs Urban Wrtng Ins I (3)
(Same as ICL 7304-8304). Intensive study of writing research, current writing practices, and issues and trends related to K-12 writing instruction. English majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements.

ENGL 8813 - Mphs Urban Wrtng Ins II (3)
(Same as ICL 7305-8305). Prepares K-12 teachers to improve their own writing practices and assume a leadership role in writing instruction in their schools. English majors may not use this course to fulfill degree requirements.

ENGL 8815 - Sem History Rhetoric (3)
Examines different periods and issues of rhetorical history each semester. One semester will consider Greek rhetoric (beginnings throught the New Testament); another will consider Latin rhetoric (Cicero through the Renaissance); a third will cover Scottish, British, and American rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topic changes.

ENGL 8816 - Sem Thrsts Prof Wrtg (3)
A study of the works of major modern writing theorists in areas such as document design, collaboration, science, persuasion, editing, and writing process.

ENGL 8817 - Sem Comp Theorists (3)
Readings from and study of major modern theorists in invention, argumentation, literacy, writing, and discourse.

ENGL 8818 - Collaborative Writing (3)
Theoretical and research-based focus on managing and developing collaborative writing projects and processes.

ENGL 8819 - Rhetoric Of Science (3)
(Same as COMM 7819-8819). This course examines scientific and technical communication from phetorical perspective, showing how scientific knowledge is shaped not only by data and method, but also by persuasive purposes and sociocultural forces.

ENGL 8820 - Topics In Rhetoric (3)
(Same as COMM 7820-8820). Topical seminar devoted to an important aspect of the history, theory, or criticism of rhetoric. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topics change.

ENGL 8822 - Cont Comp Theory (3)
Examines relationship between rhetorical and composition theory and contemporary philosophy, especially poststructuralism, neo-pragmatism, and hermeneutics.

ENGL 8823 - Topics In Composition (3)
Topics can include invention, the writing process, writing assessment, style, and writing program administration. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topics change.

ENGL 8890 - Topic/Technical Writing (3)
Intensive study of specialized areas in technical writing. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours when topics change.

ENGL 8900 - Engl Stds Colloquium (3)
Defines and compares the history, research methodologies, and current issues of each of the concentrations in the doctoral program to provide integrative understanding of the discipline, and guide the student toward preparing and defending the dissertation proposal.

ENGL 9000 - Dissertation (1-9)
No more than 9 hours may be applied toward the degree. Grades of S, U, or IP will be given.

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