Internships
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Career Services
Internship Success Stories

Alan BunnAlthough he has held two previous marketing internships, Bunn acknowledges the excitement that he has for interning at a communications firm, a position that is certain to provide a very different experience from any position that he has held in the past. Sure to be a resume booster, Bunn says that he looks forward to attaining concrete work experience to complement the theory that he has learned in his academic courses. "Having the opportunity to spend an entire semester as an intern at a first-rate communications firm in Washington, D.C., while receiving academic credit for the experience is definitely one of the highlights of my college career," he said.

—Alan Bunn

Evaluation of your Internship Program

Once your first intern has begun, you can develop a process to evaluate your internship program. You may consider how the internship is meeting your organization’s needs, and how your internship program is meeting the needs of your interns. You may evaluate your selection process and internship descriptions. Keep in mind that students seek internship opportunities throughout the year:

  • fall semester (September through December)
  • spring semester (January through April)
  • summer semester (May through August)

As your internship program grows, you may offer opportunities more often and develop a timeline to find interns throughout the year.

How well is the internship program meeting our organization’s needs?

You may seek input on this topic from various department heads, mentors, intern supervisors, and other employees. Perhaps you will return to your first Internal Needs Assessment and determine if interns were assigned to appropriate projects or evaluate if new project needs exist.

How well is our internship program meeting the needs of our interns?

You may develop an “exit survey” to gather input from your interns to evaluate their experience. What new skills did they learn? Did they receive consistent feedback about their work throughout the internship? Do they view your organization favorably as a potential employer upon graduation?

Are there other projects or departments in our organization where an intern could add value?

You may “pilot” your internship program in only a few selected departments or areas of your organization initially. However, as the idea catches on among your employees, you may find other areas to “branch out” internally with your internship opportunities.

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Last Updated: 1/23/12