Members of the Tandy Institute's epigraphic team
All of these columns upheld a roof consisting of networks of massive stone beams called architraves.
Aerial view of the Great Hypostyle Hall at Karnak
The war scenes of Seti I were copied by the Epigraphic Survey of the  University of Chicago in the 1970s. This definitive record is already invaluable since the reliefs have decayed rapidly since then.
Covering an area large enough to accommodate the whole of Paris' Notre Dame Cathedral, the size and splendor of the Great Hypostyle Hall is enough to astound even the most jaded observer.
Interior Wall Scenes - View hundreds of images taken from the interior walls of Karnak
If you would like to know more about The Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall project or would like to Support the project you may contact:  Dr. Peter J. Brand Associate Professor of Ancient History Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology
Epigraphy Methods: Photography is the simplest and most direct means of recording well preserved inscriptions and it revolutionized the recording of Egypt's monumental legacy when it first appeared in the early Nineteenth Century. Unfortunately, its not the most scientifically reliable method of recording.

The Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project

The Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project is a joint endeavor of the University of Memphis, in Memphis, Tennessee (U.S.A.), and the Université de Québec à Montréal (Canada). We work in cooperation with Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities and the Centre Franco-égyptien d'études des temples de Karnak (France). For more information contact the Project Director Dr. Peter J. Brand.

 Welcome

Welcome!

Report

Field Reports

Project

The Project

Epigraphy

Epigraphy

About the Hypostyle Hall

About the Hypostyle Hall

Reliefs and Inscriptions

Reliefs and Inscriptions


Our work is made possible through generous grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, USA and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

   National Endowment for the Humanities    Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council