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Spring 2020 Lecture Series

All lectures will take place on the University of Memphis Campus
Free and open to the public


Jewish Musicians in Argentina During the Nazi Period: Integration, Music, and Memory

Silvia Glocer // Universidad de Buenos Aires Lecture Poster
  • Thursday, February 13, 2020
  • River Room, 300 University Center
  • Reception at 5:30 PM, Lecture at 6:00 PM
  • Convenient and affordable parking in the Zach Curlin Garage
  • This lecture is jointly sponsored by the World Languages and Literature Department and the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

During the Third Reich an unprecedented number of artists and intellectuals, mostly from Germany and Austria, were forced into exile in countries around the globe. In the Americas, Argentina was second only to the United States in the total number of refugees it welcomed, and around 140 of them were Jewish professional musicians. Dr. Glocer's research finally tells these musicians' stories, including their reasons for choosing Argentina and their influence on Argentine musical culture. By exploring their arrival, adaptation, and musical creations, this lecture helps to recover these musicians' intellectual and artistic legacy.

Silvia Glocer is a Professor of Music at the Universidad de Buenos Aires and the Alberto Ginastera Conservatory and has been a musicologist at the Argentine National Library for fourteen years. She is the author of Melodías del destierro and Paul Walter Jacob y las músicas prohibidas por el azismo (with University of Memphis faculty member Robert Kelz).


The Jim Crow Cigarette in China: An Intimate History of Corporate Imperialism

Nan Enstad // University of Wisconsin, Madison // Belle McWilliams Lecture Enstad Book Cover
  • Thursday, February 20, 2020
  • River Room, 300 University Center
  • Reception at 5:30 PM, Lecture at 6:00 PM
  • Convenient and affordable parking in the Zach Curlin Garage
  • This lecture is jointly sponsored by the Department of History and the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

 

The global cigarette of the twentieth century had its beginning in the bright leaf tobacco fields of the Upper South, where African American men and women tended and cured the new agricultural commodity. Soon this cigarette, which developed in tandem with Jim Crow segregation, circulated around the world, including to China where the British American Tobacco Company built a thriving industry. This talk tells the story of how the bright leaf cigarette came to dominate a global industry, linking Jim Crow segregation in the United States to capitalist imperialism in China.

Nan Enstad is Professor of Community and Environmental Sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and author of Cigarettes Inc: An Intimate History of Corporate Imperialism (Chicago, 2018). She has published recently in Modern American History and the Boston Review.


Phenomenal Intentionality and Intentionality Holism (CANCELLED)

Terry Horgan // University of Arizona // Simco Lecture

  • Friday, March 20, 2020
  • Bluff Room, University Center 304
  • 3:00PM-5:00PM
  • Convenient and affordable parking in the Zach Curlin Garage
  • This lecture is jointly sponsored by the Department of Philosophy and the Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities.

The Simco Lecture has been cancelled.

A paradox arises when one subscribes to two commonly held positions in philosophy of mind. The first position is the Phenomenal Intentionality (PI) thesis. PI states that conscious representational states, like occurrent conscious thoughts, are constituted by phenomenal properties. The second position is methodological Holism. Holism tells us that complex systems (like our own cognitive systems) are best understood as a whole. Moreover, understanding a particular component (for example an occurrent thought) is not possible in isolation of understanding the relationships that tie that thought to the larger complex system. So, the paradox presents itself: if phenomenology constitutes the representational properties of a thought, how can the phenomenal properties of a conscious thought be intrinsic to the thought itself while the content depends constitutively on the cognitive system as a whole? This lecture will explain and unpack this paradox, called the intrinsicness/holism dilemma.

Terry Horgan is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Arizona and a former professor at University of Memphis who writes about metaphysics, epistemology, mind, and metaethics. He is the author of Austere Realism: Contextual Semantics Meets Minimal Ontology (with M. Potrč), The Epistemological Spectrum: At the Interface of Cognitive Science and Conceptual Analysis (with D. Henderson), and Essays on Paradoxes, along with many articles and essays.

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