2019 Events

About Hooks Events

Protecting and promoting civil rights and social justice requires vigilance by each of us. The Hooks Institute hopes you will stay engaged with and connected to efforts to promote a just, fair and democratic society. We encourage you to join us at our public events.

Click here to view upcoming and past Hooks African American Male Initiative events.

Spring 2019 Events

June 24 – October 5

If I Had A Camera | Art Shay: Activism, Civil Rights & Justice

Co-organized by The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change and the Art Museum of the University of Memphis

June 24— October 5 | Monday— Saturday | 9 AM— 5 PM

Art Museum of the University of Memphis 
3750 Norriswood Dr. 142 Communication & Fine Art Building Memphis, TN 38152.

This exhibition features the photographs of Art Shay (1922-2018) a Chicago-based freelance photographer whose work appeared in Time, Life, Sports Illustrated and many other national publications. During the 1960s, Shay photographed America’s landmark civil rights movements reflecting a struggle that is not history, but continues today.

Admission is free for everyone, Monday through Saturday. Convenient and affordable parking available at the public parking garage on Innovation Drive or at the Central Avenue parking lot.


 

May 20 – June 27

Exhibit, “Uplift the vote. Everybody should have a voting story. This is theirs. What will be yours?”

Dunbar Carver Museum | 112 Hillcrest Dr., Brownsville, TN

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis and the Dunbar Carver Museum invite you to experience "Uplift the Vote: Everyone Should Have a Voting Story," a dual exhibit on the importance of our most basic civil right – the right to vote.

Explore through photographs, documents and reflections, how African Americans' demand for the right to vote in Fayette County, Tenn., in 1959 changed the lives of activists, the community and the nation through the exhibit. Then, prepare yourself for your own civic participation and learn how to register to vote in Tennessee. This exhibit is intended to educate and encourage citizens to exercise the right to vote, hard-won by African Americans and others.

This exhibit is free and open to the public.

About the "Uplift the Vote" Exhibit
Fayette County, Tenn., 1959: The African American community faces Jim Crow laws, intimidation and violence in their efforts to register to vote. The New York Times described the civil rights movement in Fayette County as "the longest sustained civil rights protest in the nation." During that movement, African Americans worked to increase registered voters and demanded fair elections, integration of public facilities and equal access to economic opportunities.


 

May 2

An Evening with Donors and Friends

By invitation

6–8 PM | University of Memphis Holiday Inn
3700 Central Avenue
Memphis, TN 38152


March 21

The Wives of the 1968 Sanitation Workers Strike

Thursday, March 21 | Reception 5:30 p.m. | Program 6 p.m. | University Center River Room (300) 

 Wives of the Sanitation Workers

Join the Hooks Institute for this special event to hear first-hand stories of courage and survival from the women of the 1968 Sanitation Workers Strike. The evening will feature select excerpts from the national video web series “1300 Men: Memphis Strike '68,” produced by Striking Voices for TheRoot.com, as well as a panel of wives and children of 1968 strikers, moderated by journalist and Striking Voices founding producer Emily Yellin.

This event is free and open to the public. Convenient and affordable parking available at the public parking garage on Zach Curlin Street.

Photos © Darius B Williams


February 19 

Economic Challenges Facing Black Men and Boys: Beyond the Data to Lived Experience

Tuesday, February 19 | Reception 5:30 PM | Presentation 6 PM | University of Memphis University Center Theatre

William R. Emmons, PhD ( Economist, Center for Household Financial Stability, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

(PDF) Dr. Emmons Powerpont  Economic Challenges Facing Black Men and Boys

Economic Challenges Facing Balck Men and Boys

Dr. Emmons explores the data from the largest study in U.S. history on intergenerational economic challenges facing African American men and boys. 

How can our communities create and sustain prosperity for men and boys of color? 

The largest research study in U.S. history on economic mobility of men and boys of color found that they experienced downward economic mobility even if born into wealth.  Dr. Emmons will address these findings. 

A panel discussion of people working in Memphis to create and sustain prosperity for men and boys of color will follow.

Panelists

Cedrick Gray, PhD (Director of Education, Shelby County, TN Government);
Elena Delavega, PhD (Associate Professor, UofM School of Social Work);
Gregory Washington, PhD (Associate Professor, UofM School of Social Work);
Darrell C. Ray, PhD (Vice President, UofM Department of Student Affairs)
and Andre E. Johnson, PhD (UofM Department of Communication and Film).
Co-sponsored by these University of Memphis entities: School of Social Work and Division of Student Affairs; and by P3 Financial Group, Inc. (Cordova, TN)

This event is free and open to the public. Event parking at $7 is available in the public parking garage on Zach Curlin Street. 


February 2

Daphene McFerren TED xTEDx Talk by Daphene McFerren

February, 2, 2019 | Crosstown Concourse. Memphis, Tennessee 

TEDx Talk by Daphene McFerren, executive director, Hooks Institute: This TEDx, "Race and Inclusivity: One Nation Under Automation" focuses on the possible impact of automation and artificial intelligence in Memphis which is a majority-minority city. Automation has the potential to help remove economic disparities that impact minorities if minorities are prepared for a 21st century workforce.


 

January 31

2018 Book AwardHooks National Book Award Presentation and Lecture Featuring James Forman, Jr.

Thursday, January 31 | Reception 5:30 p.m. | Lecture 6 p.m.
University Center Theatre University of Memphis

Presenting Sponsor: Just City

Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America by James Forman Jr. was selected as the winner for the 2017 National Book Award. In his book, Forman argues that America’s draconian sentences for drug crimes were created not only by whites but also inadvertently by exasperated African American leaders whose communities were facing an unprecedented drug epidemic starting in the late 1960s. Forman encourages a candid examination of this history to tackle criminal justice reform. 

Sponsored by these University of Memphis entities: African and African American Studies, Black Law Students Association, Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, Department of Anthropology, Department of History, Marcus W. Orr Center for the Humanities and Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice; and by Burke’s Book Store and The Wharton Law Firm.

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. 

The University of Memphis, 499 University St., Memphis, TN 38152. Convenient parking is located at the public parking garage on Zach Curlin.


January 30–March

Exhibit, “Uplift the vote. Everybody should have a voting story. This is theirs. What will be yours?”

Fayette County Public Schools Central Administration Building,10425 Hwy 76 S. Somerville, TN 38068

February 7 – March 7, Monday through Friday from 12 pm to 4 pm.

The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis and Fayette County Public Schools, Somerville, Tennessee invite you to experience "Uplift the Vote: Everyone Should Have a Voting Story," a dual exhibit on the importance of our most basic civil right – the right to vote. Explore through photographs, documents and reflections, how African Americans' demand for the right to vote in Fayette County, Tenn., in 1959 changed the lives of activists, the community and the nation through the exhibit. Then, prepare yourself for your own civic participation and learn how to register to vote in Tennessee. This exhibit is intended to educate and encourage citizens to exercise the right to vote, hard-won by African Americans and others.

This exhibit is free and open to the public.

About the "Uplift the Vote" Exhibit
Fayette County, Tenn., 1959: The African American community faces Jim Crow laws, intimidation and violence in their efforts to register to vote. The New York Times described the civil rights movement in Fayette County as "the longest sustained civil rights protest in the nation." During that movement, African Americans worked to increase registered voters and demanded fair elections, integration of public facilities and equal access to economic opportunities.


January 21

Civil Rights & Jewish Activism, 2018-19 Jewish Literary & Cultural Arts Series

Monday, January 21, 7 PM | Memphis Jewish Community Center, 6560 Poplar Avenue