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Epidemiology Research

Observing Markers for Reduced Lung Function Related to Asthma and COPD in Children and Adults 

Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Healthcare Solutions

Dr. Wilfried Karmaus, professor in the division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Environmental Health in the School of Public Health, received continuation funding for his $3.2 million (five-year) award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Karmaus' project "Effect of prenatal compounds on adult lung function via neonatal DNA methylation" addresses markers for reduced lung function that are related to asthma in children and adults, as well as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults.

This study will help to predict at birth whether a child is at risk of reduced lung function and will provide parents with knowledge, empowering them to improve their child's health. In addition, information on DNA-methylation and metabolic markers at birth related to lung function later in life will offer novel opportunities, to develop specific and individualized medical measures of prevention.

University of Memphis co-investigators are Dr. Hongmei Zhang, professor and director in the Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Environmental Health in the School of Public Health, and Dr. Su Chen, assistant professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences. Collaborating institutions include both national and international researchers from Michigan State University, University of Bristol, University of Southampton, The Asthma and Allergy Research Center on the Isle of Wight and Hokkaido University.

 

RE-aiming at Hydroxyurea Adherence for Sickle Cell with mHealth (RE-HASH)

Dr. Matthew Smeltzer

Dr. Matthew Smeltzer, assistant professor in the Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Environmental Health was awarded $187,630 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in collaboration with St. Jude Children's Research Hospital for continuation of his project "RE-aiming at Hydroxyurea Adherence for Sickle Cell with mHealth (RE-HASH)".

 

Breastfeeding and Child Health

Wilfried J.J. Karmaus, MD, Dr. med, MPH

Dr. Karmaus' research on breastfeeding is supported by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The research interest is to determine whether direct feeding at the breast provides more protection against asthma, eczema, food allergy, and obesity compared to pumping and feeding, and mixed feeding of formula and/or solid food. Click here for a description of his various funded research projects. 

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